See also: rasé, rasë, rašė, řase, and RASE

English

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Etymology

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From Middle English rasen, from Old French raser, from Vulgar Latin *rasare, from Latin rasus < rado. See also erase.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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rase (plural rases)

  1. (obsolete) A scratching out, or erasure.
    • 1612, Pietro Martire “d'” Anghiera, De Novo Orbe, Or the Historie of the West Indies, page 89:
      But of the diuersitie of popingaies, we haue spoken sufficiently in the firste Decade: for in the rase of this large lande, Colonus him selfe brought and sent to the courte a great number of euery kinde, the whiche it was lawfull for all the people to beholde, and are yet daily brought in like manner.
    • 1628, John Gaule, The Practiqve Theorists Panegyrick. … A Sermon preached at Pauls-Crosse:
      The rase of whose skinne [] was more then the torment of their wretched Bodyes
    • 1773, “Hycke-Scorner: A Morality.”, in Thomas Hawkins, editor, The Origin of the English Drama, page 89:
      Felowes, they shall never more us withstonde, For I se them all drowned in the rase of Irlonde,
  2. A slight wound; a scratch.
  3. A way of measuring in which the commodity measured was made even with the top of the measuring vessel by rasing, or striking off, all that was above it.

Verb

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rase (third-person singular simple present rases, present participle rasing, simple past and past participle rased)

  1. (obsolete) To rub along the surface of; to graze.
    • 1692, Robert South, “A Sermon Preached at Westminster-Abbey, February 22. 1684-5. [Julian calendar]”, in Twelve Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions. [], volume I, London: [] J[ohn] H[eptinstall] for Thomas Bennet, [], →OCLC, page 317:
      For was he not in the neareſt Neighbourhood to Death? And might not the Bullet, that perhaps razed his Cheek, have as eaſily gone into his Head?
    • 1786, [William Beckford], translated by [Samuel Henley], An Arabian Tale, from an Unpublished Manuscript: [] [Vathek], new edition, London: [] W. Clarke, [], published 1809, →OCLC, page 103:
      Sometimes, his feet raſed the ſurface of the water; and, at others, the ſkylight almoſt flattened his noſe.
  2. (obsolete) To rub or scratch out; to erase.
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, “Sonnet 25”, in Shake-speares Sonnets. [][1], London: By G[eorge] Eld for T[homas] T[horpe] and are to be sold by William Aspley, →OCLC:
      The painefull warrier famoſed for worth,
      After a thouſand victories once foild,
      Is from the booke of honour raſed quite,
      And all the reſt forgot for which he toild: []
    • 1660, Thomas Fuller, “Name General”, in Mixt Contemplations in Better Times, London: [] R[oger] D[aniel] for Iohn Williams, [], →OCLC, page 17:
      Though we carry a ſimple and ſingle remembrance of our loſſes unto the grave, it being impoſſible to do other-waies (except we raze the faculty of memory Roote and Branch out of our mind) yet let us not keep any record of them with the leaſt reflection of revenge.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book I”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker []; [a]nd by Robert Boulter []; [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC, lines 361–363:
      Though of their Names in heavenly Records now / Be no memorial, blotted out and ras'd / By thir Rebellion, from the Books of Life.
  3. To level with the ground; to overthrow; to destroy; to raze.
  4. To be leveled with the ground; to fall; to suffer overthrow.

Anagrams

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Czech

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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rase f

  1. dative/locative singular of rasa

Danish

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Etymology

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From Old Norse rasa.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /raːsə/, [ˈʁɑːsə]

Verb

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rase (imperative ras, infinitive at rase, present tense raser, past tense rasede, perfect tense har raset)

  1. to rage
  2. to storm

Estonian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Finnic *rasëda.

Adjective

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rase (genitive raseda, partitive rasedat, comparative rasedam, superlative kõige rasedam)

  1. pregnant
    Synonym: tiine

Declension

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Declension of rase (ÕS type 2/õpik, no gradation)
singular plural
nominative rase rasedad
accusative nom.
gen. raseda
genitive rasedate
partitive rasedat rasedaid
illative rasedasse rasedatesse
rasedaisse
inessive rasedas rasedates
rasedais
elative rasedast rasedatest
rasedaist
allative rasedale rasedatele
rasedaile
adessive rasedal rasedatel
rasedail
ablative rasedalt rasedatelt
rasedailt
translative rasedaks rasedateks
rasedaiks
terminative rasedani rasedateni
essive rasedana rasedatena
abessive rasedata rasedateta
comitative rasedaga rasedatega

Anagrams

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French

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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rase

  1. feminine singular of ras

Verb

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rase

  1. inflection of raser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

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Anagrams

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German

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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rase

  1. inflection of rasen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Indonesian

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Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Etymology

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From Javanese ꦫꦱꦺ (rasé).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈrase/
  • Hyphenation: ra‧sé

Noun

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rasé (first-person possessive raseku, second-person possessive rasemu, third-person possessive rasenya)

  1. small Indian civet (Viverricula indica).
    Synonyms: musang bulan, musang rase

Coordinate terms

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Further reading

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Italian

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Verb

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rase

  1. third-person singular past historic of radere

Adjective

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rase

  1. feminine plural of raso

Anagrams

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Latin

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Participle

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rāse

  1. vocative masculine singular of rāsus

References

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Latvian

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Noun

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rase f (5th declension)

  1. race (a large group of people set apart from others on the basis of a common heritage)
  2. colour

Declension

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Derived terms

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology 1

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From Italian razza and Middle French race.

Noun

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rase m (definite singular rasen, indefinite plural raser, definite plural rasene)

  1. a race (of humankind)
  2. a breed (of animal)

Etymology 2

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From Old Norse rasa.

Verb

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rase (imperative ras, present tense raser, passive rases, simple past raste, past participle rast, present participle rasende)

  1. to be furious, fume, rage, rave
  2. (figurative: fever, plague, war) to rage
  3. (river) to rush, sweep over, tear along
  4. (storm) to wreak havoc
  5. (e.g. in an avalanche) to fall, slide
  6. (with sammen) to collapse, cave in
Derived terms
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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology 1

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From Italian razza and Middle French race.

Noun

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rase m (definite singular rasen, indefinite plural rasar, definite plural rasane)

  1. a race (of humankind)
  2. a breed (of animal)

Etymology 2

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From Old Norse rasa.

Verb

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rase (present tense rasar, past tense rasa, past participle rasa, passive infinitive rasast, present participle rasande, imperative rase/ras)

  1. to be furious, fume, rage, rave
  2. (figurative: fever, plague, war) to rage
  3. (river) to rush, sweep over, tear along
  4. (storm) to wreak havoc
  5. (e.g. in an avalanche) to fall, slide
  6. (with saman) to collapse, cave in
Alternative forms
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Derived terms
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References

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Old Javanese

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈrase/
  • Hyphenation: ra‧sé

Noun

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rase

  1. civet
    Synonyms: lubak, luwak

Descendants

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  • Javanese: ꦫꦱꦺ (rasé)
    • Indonesian: rase

Further reading

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  • "rase" in P.J. Zoetmulder with the collaboration of S.O. Robson, Old Javanese-English Dictionary. 's-Gravenhage: M. Nijhoff, 1982.

Pali

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Alternative forms

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Noun

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rase

  1. inflection of rasa (taste):
    1. locative singular
    2. accusative plural

Spanish

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Verb

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rase

  1. inflection of rasar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative