See also: rasé, rasë, rašė, and řase

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English rasen, from Old French raser, from Vulgar Latin *rasare, from Latin rasus < rado. See also erase.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rase (plural rases)

  1. (obsolete) A scratching out, or erasure.
    • 1612, Pietro Martire “d'” Anghiera, De Novo Orbe, Or the Historie of the West Indies, page 89:
      But of the diuersitie of popingaies, we haue spoken sufficiently in the firste Decade: for in the rase of this large lande, Colonus him selfe brought and sent to the courte a great number of euery kinde, the whiche it was lawfull for all the people to beholde, and are yet daily brought in like manner.
    • 1628, John Gaule, The Practiqve Theorists Panegyrick. … A Sermon preached at Pauls-Crosse
      The rase of whose skinne [] was more then the torment of their wretched Bodyes
    • 1773, “Hycke-Scorner: A Morality.”, in Thomas Hawkins, editor, The Origin of the English Drama, page 89:
      Felowes, they shall never more us withstonde, For I se them all drowned in the rase of Irlonde,
  2. A slight wound; a scratch.
  3. A way of measuring in which the commodity measured was made even with the top of the measuring vessel by rasing, or striking off, all that was above it.

VerbEdit

rase (third-person singular simple present rases, present participle rasing, simple past and past participle rased)

  1. (obsolete) To rub along the surface of; to graze.
    • 1692, Robert South, “A Sermon Preached at Westminster-Abbey, February 22. 1684-5. [Julian calendar]”, in Twelve Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions, volume I, 6th edition, London: [] J[ames] Bettenham, for Jonah Bowyer, [], published 1727, OCLC 21766567, page 317:
      For was he not in the neareſt Neighbourhood to Death? And might not the Bullet, that perhaps razed his Cheek, have as eaſily gone into his Head?
    • 1786, [William Beckford], [Samuel Henley], transl., An Arabian Tale, from an Unpublished Manuscript: [] [Vathek], new edition, London: [] W. Clarke, [], published 1809, OCLC 30959801, page 103:
      Sometimes, his feet raſed the ſurface of the water; and, at others, the ſkylight almoſt flattened his noſe.
  2. (obsolete) To rub or scratch out; to erase.
  3. To level with the ground; to overthrow; to destroy; to raze.
  4. To be leveled with the ground; to fall; to suffer overthrow.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rase f

  1. dative/locative singular of rasa

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse rasa.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /raːsə/, [ˈʁɑːsə]

VerbEdit

rase (imperative ras, infinitive at rase, present tense raser, past tense rasede, perfect tense har raset)

  1. to rage
  2. to storm

EstonianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rase (genitive raseda, partitive rasedat, comparative rasedam, superlative kõige rasedam)

  1. pregnant
    Synonym: tiine

DeclensionEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rase

  1. feminine singular of ras

VerbEdit

rase

  1. inflection of raser:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rase

  1. inflection of rasen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

IndonesianEdit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

EtymologyEdit

From Javanese ꦫꦱꦺ (rasé).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrase/
  • Hyphenation: ra‧sé

NounEdit

rasé (first-person possessive raseku, second-person possessive rasemu, third-person possessive rasenya)

  1. small Indian civet (Viverricula indica).
    Synonyms: musang bulan, musang rase

Coordinate termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

rase

  1. third-person singular past historic of radere

AdjectiveEdit

rase

  1. feminine plural of raso

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

rāse

  1. vocative masculine singular of rāsus

ReferencesEdit


LatvianEdit

NounEdit

rase f (5th declension)

  1. race (a large group of people set apart from others on the basis of a common heritage)
  2. colour

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Italian razza and Middle French race.

NounEdit

rase m (definite singular rasen, indefinite plural raser, definite plural rasene)

  1. a race (of humankind)
  2. a breed (of animal)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse rasa.

VerbEdit

rase (imperative ras, present tense raser, passive rases, simple past raste, past participle rast, present participle rasende)

  1. to be furious, fume, rage, rave
  2. (figurative: fever, plague, war) to rage
  3. (river) to rush, sweep over, tear along
  4. (storm) to wreak havoc
  5. (e.g. in an avalanche) to fall, slide
  6. (with sammen) to collapse, cave in
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Italian razza and Middle French race.

NounEdit

rase m (definite singular rasen, indefinite plural rasar, definite plural rasane)

  1. a race (of humankind)
  2. a breed (of animal)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse rasa.

VerbEdit

rase (present tense rasar, past tense rasa, past participle rasa, passive infinitive rasast, present participle rasande, imperative rase/ras)

  1. to be furious, fume, rage, rave
  2. (figurative: fever, plague, war) to rage
  3. (river) to rush, sweep over, tear along
  4. (storm) to wreak havoc
  5. (e.g. in an avalanche) to fall, slide
  6. (with saman) to collapse, cave in
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

rase

  1. inflection of rasa (taste):
    1. locative singular
    2. accusative plural

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

rase

  1. inflection of rasar:
    1. first-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular present subjunctive
    3. third-person singular imperative