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See also: göre, gøre, góré, górę, Gore, and Göre

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English gor, gore, gorre, from Old English gor (dirt, dung, filth, muck), from Proto-Germanic *gurą (half-digested stomach contents; feces; manure), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷʰer- (hot; warm) .

NounEdit

gore (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete except in dialects) Dirt; mud; filth.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Fisher to this entry?)
  2. Blood, especially that from a wound when thickened due to exposure to the air.
  3. Murder, bloodshed, violence.
    • 2017 February 23, Katie Rife, “The Girl With All The Gifts tries to put a fresh spin on overripe zombie clichés”, in The Onion AV Club[1]:
      The zombie scenes are reminiscent of what you might see on a show like The Walking Dead, short bursts of extreme violence and gore punctuating expository dialogue scenes where the survivors try to figure out how they’re going to get from point A to point B.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from gore (a projecting point), or ultimately from Old English gār (spear), itself from Proto-Germanic *gaizaz. Related to gar.

VerbEdit

gore (third-person singular simple present gores, present participle goring, simple past and past participle gored)

  1. (of an animal) To pierce with the horns.
    The bull gored the matador.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Old English gāra, from Proto-Germanic *gaizô.

NounEdit

gore (plural gores)

  1. A triangular piece of land where roads meet.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Cowell to this entry?)
  2. A triangular or rhomboid piece of fabric, especially one forming part of a three-dimensional surface such as a sail, skirt, hot-air balloon, etc.Wp
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, chapter 4, in An Autobiography, part II, London: Collins, →ISBN:
      Mind you, clothes were clothes in those days. […]  Frills, ruffles, flounces, lace, complicated seams and gores: not only did they sweep the ground and have to be held up in one hand elegantly as you walked along, but they had little capes or coats or feather boas.
  3. An elastic gusset for providing a snug fit in a shoe.
  4. A projecting point.
  5. (heraldry) One of the abatements, made of two curved lines, meeting in an acute angle in the fesse point.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gore (third-person singular simple present gores, present participle goring, simple past and past participle gored)

  1. To cut in a triangular form.
  2. To provide with a gore.
    to gore an apron

AnagramsEdit


KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Persian جوراب (jôrâb).

NounEdit

gore ?

  1. sock
  2. stocking

PortugueseEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Slavic *gora compare gora (hill).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡôre/
  • Hyphenation: go‧re

AdverbEdit

gȍre (Cyrillic spelling го̏ре)

  1. up, above

AntonymsEdit

NounEdit

gȍre f (Cyrillic spelling го̏ре)

  1. genitive singular form of gora
  2. nominative plural form of gora
  3. accusative singular form of gora
  4. vocative singular form of gora

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡôreː/
  • Hyphenation: go‧re

AdverbEdit

gȍrē (Cyrillic spelling го̏ре̄)

  1. worse