TranslingualEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • English:

SymbolEdit

sinh

  1. (trigonometry) The symbol of the hyperbolic function hyperbolic sine.

Usage notesEdit

The symbol sinh is prescribed by the ISO 80000-2:2019 standard. The symbol sh is also in use, and is especially favoured in French- and Russian-language texts.

See alsoEdit


EnglishEdit

 
Laotian women wearing sinhs

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Lao ສິ້ນ (sin) or Thai ซิ่น (sîn).

NounEdit

sinh (plural sinhs)

  1. A traditional tube skirt worn by Lao and Thai women, particularly northern Thai and northeastern Thai women.
    • 1992, Lucretia Stewart, Tiger balm: travels in Laos, Vietnam & Cambodia, page 25:
      These dancers with their graceful upright carriage, their dreamy distant expressions and their party sins (the women were wearing sins made of brightly-coloured silk woven in squares and broad stripes and usually worn by men) were infinitely more appealing than the younger dancers and the electronic band but, as Darachit was fond of saying and without apparent regret, 'Les traditions ne sont plus respectees."
    • 1998, Grant Evans, The Politics of Ritual and Remembrance: Laos Since 1975, →ISBN, page 86:
      The only enforced dress codes now [in Laos] are for female public servants who continue to wear the sinh, though outside of work they can wear what they like.
    • 2008, Robert Cooper, CultureShock! Laos: A Survival Guide to Customs and Etiquette, →ISBN:
      After the change in regime of 1975, every woman seen in public was wearing a sin, as this was part of a dresscode favoured by the new socialist government.
    • 2009, Arne Kislenko, Culture and Customs of Laos, →ISBN, page 128:
      Communism made things even worse by eliminating the export market for locally made textiles and, in some cases, prohibiting the production of silk and the manufacture of clothes. Although traditional sins were allowed, colorful ones were considered bourgeois and banned.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Alemannic GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German sīn (to be) (with some inflections from Proto-Germanic *wesaną (to be) and *beuną (to be, exist, become)), from Proto-Indo-European *es-, *h₁es- (to be, exist). Cognate with German sein.

VerbEdit

sinh

  1. (Issime) to be

ReferencesEdit

  • “sinh” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

VietnameseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Southern Vietnam) sanh

EtymologyEdit

Sino-Vietnamese word from (birth).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sinh

  1. (intransitive) to produce; to yield
  2. (transitive) to give birth (to)

NounEdit

sinh

  1. Short for sinh học (biology).
  2. (archaic) Short for học sinh (student).
  3. (only in compounds) life
Derived termsEdit