Translingual

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Symbol

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ve

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Venda.

English

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Russian вэ ().

Noun

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ve (plural ves)

  1. The name of the Cyrillic script letter В / в.

Etymology 2

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First proposed by Philologus in the July 1864 Ladies' Repository, with possessive vis and objective vim, as an alternative to using "he or she," singular they, or one in sentences without a specified gender.[1] In 1970, Varda One proposed ve, vis and objective ver in a feminist article titled "Manglish."[2] Greg Egan used the pronouns throughout the novels Distress (1995) and Diaspora (1998).

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ve (third-person singular, nominative case, accusative ver, possessive adjective vis, possessive noun vers, reflexive verself)

  1. (rare, epicene, nonstandard) Gender-neutral third-person singular subject pronoun, equivalent to singular they.
    • [1984, Keri Hulme, The Bone People, reprint edition, New York: Penguin Books, published 1986, →ISBN, pages 425–426:
      And stop calling it 'it': yer got yer one great invention, remember Holmes? The neuter personal pronoun; ve/ver/vis, I am not his, vis/ve/ver, nor am I for her, ver/vis/ve, a pronoun for me, (slopping another tin of water out ready).]
    • 1995, Greg Egan, Distress, reprint edition, London: Phoenix, published 1996, →ISBN, page 223:
      Ve held up vis right hand; I reached down and took it, and began to haul ver up; ve shook vis head impatiently.
    • 1997, Greg Egan, Diaspora, reprint edition, New York: HarperPrism, published 1998, →ISBN, page 52:
      Yatima felt distinctly stretched by the process—but vis symbols were still connected to each other in the same way as before. Ve was still verself.
Synonyms
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Etymology 3

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Pronoun

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ve

  1. Pronunciation spelling of we.
    • 1872, Charles Camden, “The Travelling Menagerie”, in George Mac Donald, editor, Good Words for the Young, London: Strahan & Co., [], chapter V (A Tiger Hunt in England), page 208, column 1:
      Ve vill go to de Sheafen Farm, and ve vill stay at de Sheafen Farm, is it not?
    • 2000 July 8, J. K. Rowling [pseudonym; Joanne Rowling], “The Yule Ball”, in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (Harry Potter; 4), London: Bloomsbury Publishing, →ISBN, page 363:
      But ve have grounds larger even than these – though in vinter, ve have very little daylight, so ve are not enjoying them.
    • 2011, Roberta C. M. DeCaprio, chapter 9, in A Rose in Amber, Wild Rose Press, →ISBN:
      “My calculations predict another day or so. Ve vill be docking in Liverpool.”
    • 2016, Sara Buttsworth, Maartje Abbenhuis, War, Myths, and Fairy Tales - Page 103:
      In Johnny Canuck, a Nazi guard says: “Look, gentlemen of der turd reich. Ve haf captured Johnny Canuck and all his friends.”
Derived terms
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References

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  1. ^ Philologus. “Notes and Queries: An Epicene Personal Pronoun Needed.” The Ladies’ Repository, July 1864, p. 439. Archived here
  2. ^ Verda One. “Manglish.” Everywoman, 8 May 1970, p. 2.

Anagrams

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Aiwoo

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Etymology

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From Proto-Oceanic *poli, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *bəli, from Proto-Austronesian *bəli.

Verb

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ve

  1. to buy

References

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  • Lackey, W.J.. & Boerger, B.H. (2021) “Reexamining the Phonological History of Oceanic's Temotu subgroup”, in Oceanic Linguistics.

Albanian

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Etymology 1

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From Old Tosk *vae, from Old Albanian vōe (still at Malagija),[1] from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg). Orel, citing Bopp, Camarda and Çabej, argues the Old Albanian word descends from a borrowing from Latin ōvum.[2] The PIE etymology was earlier supported by Norbert Jokl.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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ve f (plural ve, definite veja, definite plural vetë)

  1. egg
    Synonym: vezë
Declension
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Hyponyms
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Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Proto-Albanian *widewā, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁widʰéwh₂ (compare English widow, Latin vidua).

Alternative forms

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Adjective

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i ve

  1. widowed

Noun

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ve f (plural va)

  1. widow, widower
    Synonyms: vejanë, vejushë
Derived terms
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References

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  1. ^ Martin E. Huld, Basic Albanian Etymologies (Columbus, OH: Slavica, 1984), 125.
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “ve”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 497

Arigidi

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Etymology

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Possibly related to Yoruba

Pronunciation

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Verb

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  1. to go

Derived terms

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  • àvè (the act of going)

References

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  • B. Oshodi, The HTS (High Tone Syllable) in Arigidi: An Introduction, in the Nordic Journal of African Studies 20(4): 263–275 (2011)
  • Boluwaji Oshodi (2011 December) A Reference Grammar of Arigidi, Montem Paperbacks, →ISBN

Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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ve f (plural ves)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter V/v.
Usage notes
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  • In some dialects of Catalan, the sounds associated with the letter b and the letter v are the same: [β]. In order to differentiate the names be and ve in those dialects, the letters are often called be alta (high B) and ve baixa (low V).
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Verb

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ve

  1. third-person singular present indicative of venir

Czech

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈvɛ]
  • Audio:(file)

Preposition

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ve

  1. Alternative form of v (in)

Usage notes

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  • The more usual form is v, while ve is used before words starting with f, v, w and certain consonant clusters.

Danish

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Etymology

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From Old Norse vei, from Proto-Germanic *wai.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ve (singular definite veen, plural indefinite veer)

  1. pain
  2. contraction of labour, birth pang

Declension

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Further reading

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East Masela

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Noun

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ve

  1. water

References

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Esperanto

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German weh, from Proto-Germanic *wai, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *wáy (oh!; woe!; alas!). Compare Yiddish וויי (vey), Dutch wee, Latin vae, Ancient Greek οὐαί (ouaí), Spanish guay, Italian guai, dialectal French , Welsh gwae, Latvian vai, Persian وای (vây), Arabic وَيْل (wayl).

Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ve

  1. alas, woe

Faroese

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Etymology

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Ultimately, from Latin .

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ve n (genitive singular ves, plural ve)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter V/v.

Declension

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Declension of ve
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative ve veið ve veini
accusative ve veið ve veini
dative vei veinum veum veunum
genitive ves vesins vea veanna

Synonyms

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See also

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French

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Noun

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ve (plural ves)

  1. Abbreviation of veuve.

Galician

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Verb

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ve

  1. inflection of ver:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Haitian Creole

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Etymology

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From French ver (worm).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ve

  1. worm

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Esperanto ve, from German weh. Compare also Latin vae.

Interjection

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ve

  1. alas, oh dear
    Ve! Me obliviis la furnelo acendite!
    Oh dear! I forgot the stove on!

Etymology 2

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From v +‎ -e.

Noun

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ve (plural ve-i)

  1. The name of the Latin script letter V/v.
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Indonesian

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Etymology

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From Dutch vee.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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  1. The name of the Latin-script letter V/v.

Synonyms

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  • vi (Standard Malay)

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Further reading

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Italian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ve/
  • Rhymes: -e
  • Hyphenation: ve

Pronoun

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ve

  1. Alternative form of vi (to you)
    Ve lo consiglioI recommend it (to you)
    Ve ne ne sarei molto gratoIt would be nice of you

Usage notes

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  • Used when followed by a third-person direct object clitic (lo, la, li, le, or ne).

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Japanese

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Romanization

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ve

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ゔぇ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ゑ゙
  3. Rōmaji transcription of ヴェ
  4. Rōmaji transcription of

Lahu

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Particle

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ve

  1. particle used after a verb similar in function to English "to". E.g. "ha ve" = "to winnow"
  2. Relativizer particle

Mandarin

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Romanization

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ve

  1. Nonstandard spelling of vê̄.

Usage notes

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  • 《汉语拼音方案》 (Scheme for the Chinese Phonetic Alphabet) defines a standard pronunciation for each letter in Hanyu Pinyin with Zhuyin. In the case of V, it is defined as ㄪㄝ, using the otherwise-obsolete initial ( /⁠v⁠/). This is one of the only instances of the letter being used in standard Pinyin.
  • 《汉语拼音方案》 (Scheme for the Chinese Phonetic Alphabet) defines a standard pronunciation for each letter in Hanyu Pinyin with Zhuyin. (/⁠ɛ⁠/) typically only occurs in syllables with an initial glide (e.g. ㄧㄝ (-ie /⁠i̯ɛ⁠/)), where it is romanized as e. When it occurs in syllables without an initial glide, however, it is romanized as ê in order to distinguish it from (-e /⁠ɤ⁠/). Such instances are rare, and are only found in interjections or neologisms.
  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Middle English

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Pronoun

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ve

  1. Alternative form of we (we)

Neapolitan

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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ve

  1. you (formal or plural, reflexive or dative or accusative)

Coordinate terms

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Number Person Nominative Accusative Dative Reflexive Possessive Prepositional
singular first-person io (i') me mìo, mìa, mieje, meje me, méne
second-person, familiar tu te tùjo, tòja, tùoje, tòje te, téne
second-person, formal vuje ve vuósto, vósta, vuóste, vóste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsso 'o, 'u (lo, lu) 'i, 'e (li, le) se sùjo, sòja, sùoje, sòje ìsso
third-person, feminine éssa 'a (la) 'e (le) éssa
plural first-person nuje ce nuósto, nòsta, nuóste, nòste nuje
second-person, plural vuje ve vuósto, vòsta, vuóste, vòste vuje
third-person, masculine ìsse 'i, 'e (li, le) llòro se llòro (invariable) llòro
third-person, feminine llòro 'e (le)

Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology 1

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From Old Norse , from Proto-Germanic *wīhą.

Noun

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ve n (definite singular veet, indefinite plural ve, definite plural vea)

  1. (historical, in Norse times) holy place, place of offering
Derived terms
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Male given names:

Female given names:

Etymology 2

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From Old Norse vei, , from Proto-Germanic *wai.

Interjection

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ve

  1. woe!
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Etymology 3

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From Old Norse , from Low German. Compare the interjection above.

Noun

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ve m (definite singular veen, indefinite plural vear, definite plural veane)

  1. birth pang
    Synonym: (føde)ri
  2. pain, longing
    ve og velwelfare (literally, “pain and wellness”)
Derived terms
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References

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Occitan

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Noun

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ve f (plural ves)

  1. vee (the letter v, V)

Derived terms

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Serbo-Croatian

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Adverb

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ve (Cyrillic spelling ве)

  1. (Kajkavian) now
    Synonym: sada

Slovene

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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vẹ̑

  1. you (feminine and neuter plural, more than two)
  2. (formal) you (feminine and neuter singular)

Inflection

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See also

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Spanish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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ve f (plural ves)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter V/v.
    Synonyms: uve, ve corta
Derived terms
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References
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Etymology 2

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Verb

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ve

  1. inflection of ver:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. second-person singular voseo imperative

Etymology 3

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Verb

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ve

  1. second-person singular imperative of ir
Usage notes
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  • The voseo imperative of ir is typically replaced with the imperative of andar, that is andá.[1]

References

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  1. ^ “Spanish from Argentina: That Voseo Thing”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[1], 2015 October 9 (last accessed)

Further reading

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Swedish

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Etymology

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From Old Swedish ve, from Old Norse vei, , from Proto-Germanic *wai, from Proto-Indo-European *wai.

Cognate with Danish ve, Icelandic vei, Old Saxon and Middle High German , German weh, Dutch wee, Old English , English woe, and also Latin vae. The interjection is original in Old Swedish. The noun might have appeared from that interjection or by loan from Middle Low German.

Pronunciation

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Interjection

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ve

  1. woe, pity you!
    ve dig!
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)
    ack och ve!
    (please add an English translation of this usage example)

Noun

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ve n

  1. woe, misery
    ditt väl och ve
    your weal and woe, your fortune and misery, (idiomatically) your welfare / well-being
    Ve och fasa!
    Woe and horror! (Horror of horrors!)

Declension

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Declension of ve 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ve ve ve ve
Genitive ves ves ves ves

Derived terms

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References

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Anagrams

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Tagalog

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Spanish ve, the Spanish name of the letter V/v.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ve (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜒ)

  1. (historical) the name of the Latin-script letter V/v, in the Abecedario
    Synonym: (in the Filipino alphabet) vi

Turkish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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ve

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter V/v.

Etymology 2

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From Ottoman Turkish و (ve), from Arabic وَ (wa).

Conjunction

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ve

  1. and
See also
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Vietnamese

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle Vietnamese ue. Probably onomatopoeic, from the cry of the cicada.

Noun

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(classifier con) ve (, )

  1. cicada
    Synonyms: ve sầu, ve ve
  2. tick

See also

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Derived terms

Etymology 2

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This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Often considered to be from French verre (glass (substance); objects made of glass). It is attested in P.J. Pigneaux's version of the Dictionarium anamitico-latinum (1772). There's also the word ue in đạn ue attested in de Rhodes (1651), glossed in Portuguese as munição, are these related? It did seem to tangle with verre in later period, but was the relationship between the two words genetic or contamination?”

Noun

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ve (, 𡐮)

  1. small bottle or jar
  2. (only in compounds) glass (substance)
See also
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Derived terms

Etymology 3

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Verb

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ve (𢠿)

  1. (chiefly in compounds) to flirt
See also
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Derived terms