See also: Weg, WEG, weg-, -weg, and węg.

Afrikaans

edit

Etymology

edit

From Dutch weg, from Middle Dutch wech, from Old Dutch weh, weg, from Proto-Germanic *wegaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ-.

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /vɛχ/
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

edit

weg (plural weë)

  1. way; path

Derived terms

edit

Adverb

edit

weg

  1. away

Dutch

edit

Etymology

edit

From Middle Dutch wech, from Old Dutch weh, weg, from Proto-West Germanic *weg, from Proto-Germanic *wegaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ-.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

weg m (plural wegen, diminutive wegje n or weggetje n)

  1. way, road
  2. manner, way (figuratively)
    Waar een wil is, is een weg.
    Where there's a will, there's a way.

Derived terms

edit

Descendants

edit
  • Afrikaans: weg

Adverb

edit

weg

  1. away
  2. gone, disappeared
    Synonym: (slang) loesoe
  3. (slang) hammered
    Hij was echt weg toen.
    He was really schnockered.

Derived terms

edit
adverbs
verbs

Descendants

edit

German

edit

Etymology

edit

Shortened from Middle High German enwec, from Old High German in weg, corresponding to modern in +‎ Weg. The first syllable is still seen in dialectal forms with e-; compare Luxembourgish ewech. Cognate with Dutch weg, Hunsrik wech, English away.

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /vɛk/ (standard)
  • Audio:(file)
  • Audio:(file)
  • IPA(key): /vɛç/ (northern and central Germany; becoming rare for this particular word)
  • Audio (Bavaria):(file)

Adverb

edit

weg

  1. away
    Geh weg!Go away!
  2. gone, not there
    Meine Tasche ist weg.My bag is gone.
    Das Rezept ist mit Knoblauch, aber du kannst ihn auch weglassen.
    The recipe is with garlic, but you can also do it without.
    (literally, “... you can also leave it away.”)
  3. (regional, Westphalia) from
    Wo bist du denn weg?
    And you, where do you come from?

Conjunction

edit

weg

  1. (now rare) minus
    • 2007, Michael Gaidoschik, Rechenschwäche verstehen - Kinder gezielt fördern: Ein Leitfaden für die Unterrichtspraxis, page 76:
      [...] 3+5 „drei und fünf“ oder „drei plus fünf“ [...] „8-5“ als „acht weg fünf“ oder „acht weniger fünf“ oder „acht minus fünf“ [...]
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 2008, Matthias E. Jacob, Der erotische Bücherwurm: Dreizehn Geschichten aller Art, 2nd edition, page 22:
      Mathematik war das noch nicht; man sagte „und“ und „weg“ und „mal“ und „durch“. Eigentlich sollte man diese Sprachregelung wieder einführen, denn es sagt sich viel leichter „1 weg minus 2 ist 3“ als „1 minus minus 2 ist 3“.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Adjective

edit

weg (indeclinable, predicative only)

  1. (informal, predicative only) unconscious; passed out
  2. (informal, predicative only) hammered; so drunk as being close to unconsciousness

Declension

edit

Indeclinable, predicative-only.

Synonyms

edit

Derived terms

edit

Ibanag

edit

Noun

edit

weg

  1. brook; stream; pond

North Frisian

edit

Etymology

edit

From Old Frisian wike, from Proto-West Germanic *wikā. Cognates include West Frisian wike.

Noun

edit

weg m (plural wegen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) week
    iansis a wegonce a week
    iarst uun a weg, began faan a wegbeginning/start of the week
    maden uun a weg, maden faan a wegmiddle of the week
    letst uun a weg, aanj faan a wegmiddle of the week

Old Dutch

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-West Germanic *weg.

Noun

edit

weg m

  1. way, path

Inflection

edit
The template Template:odt-decl-table does not use the parameter(s):
head=weg
Please see Module:checkparams for help with this warning.

Alternative forms

edit

Descendants

edit

Further reading

edit
  • weg”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

edit

Alternative forms

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-West Germanic *weg, from Proto-Germanic *wegaz.

Cognates include Old Frisian wei, Old Saxon weg, Old Dutch weg, Old High German weg, Old Norse vegr, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌲𐍃 (wigs). Compare West Frisian wei, Dutch weg, Icelandic vegur, Faroese vegur, Danish vej, Norwegian vei, and Swedish väg, which are all still the main word for both "way" and "road" in their respective languages.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

weġ m (nominative plural wegas)

  1. way
    • late 9th century, King Alfred's translation of Boethius' The Consolation of Philosophy
      Ġetǣċ mē þone weġ.
      Show me the way.
    • c. 992, Ælfric of Eynsham, "The Epiphany of the Lord"
      Wē ne magon ġeċierran þæs weġes þe wē cōmon.
      We can't go back the way we came.
    • late 9th century, translation of Bede's Ecclesiastical History
      Hē lǣdde mē eft þȳ selfan weġe þe wit ǣr cōmon.
      He brought me back the same way we came before.
    • The Life of Saint Margaret
      Eall hīe hāl and ġesund on heora weġe hām ġewenton.
      They all went safe and sound on their way home.
    • Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, year 888
      Æðelswīþ cwēn, sēo wæs Ælfrēdes sweostor cyninges, forþfērde be Rōme weġe.
      Queen Æthelswith, who was King Alfred's sister, died on the way to Rome.
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, the Old English Hexateuch, Deuteronomy 1:22
      Uton sendan sċēaweras þæt sċēawiġen þæt land and cȳðen ūs on hwelcne weġ wē faran sċulon and tō hwelcum burgum.
      Let's send spies who can survey the land and tell us which way to go and to what cities.
    • late 10th century, Ælfric, "The Seven Sleepers"
      nu ic wæs of þam rihtan wege mines ingeþances ac betere hit bið þæt ic eft fare ut of þysum porte ðylæs þe ic to swiðe dwelige and for-þy þonne ne cume to minum geferum þe me ær hyder sendon; gewislice ic her ongyten hæbbe þæt me hæfð gelæht fæste mines modes oferstige þæt ic nat na forgeare hu ic hit þus macige.
      Now I was in the right way in my inward thought, but better will it be that I go out of this town again lest I be too greatly bewildered, and so may not come to my comrades who erewhile sent me here; certainly I have here perceived that the over anxiety of my mind hath here seized me, so that I know not very certainly why I thus act.
  2. road

Usage notes

edit
  • Weġ means "way" as in "path, road, direction, means to enter or leave a place." For "way" as in "method or manner of doing something, state or condition," the word used is wīse.

Declension

edit

Derived terms

edit

Descendants

edit

Old High German

edit

Alternative forms

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-West Germanic *weg. Cognate with Old Saxon weg, Old Dutch weg, Old English weġ, Old Norse vegr, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌲𐍃 (wigs).

Noun

edit

weg m (plural wega)

  1. way

Declension

edit

Descendants

edit

Old Saxon

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-West Germanic *weg, from Proto-Germanic *wegaz, from Proto-Indo-European *weǵʰ-.

Germanic cognates include Old English weġ (whence modern English way), Old Dutch weg, Old High German weg, Old Norse vegr, Gothic 𐍅𐌹𐌲𐍃 (wigs).

Noun

edit

weg m

  1. way; path; road

Declension

edit


Descendants

edit
  • Middle Low German: wech
    • Dutch Low Saxon: weg
    • German Low German: Weg
    • Plautdietsch: Wajch