See also: Ast, AST, ást, ăst, as't, -ast, aṣṭ, and åst

TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

ast

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Asturian.

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

ast

  1. Pronunciation spelling of asked, simple past tense and past participle of ask

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hasta (spear, lance).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ast m (plural asts or astos)

  1. spit, skewer
    pollastre a l'ast
    chicken on the skewer

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • “ast” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

CimbrianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German ast, from Old High German ast.

NounEdit

ast m (plural éste)

  1. (Sette Comuni) conifer branch
    Dar ast ist guuts holtz so prönnan.
    Conifer branches make excellent firewood.

ReferencesEdit

  • “ast” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably a univerbation of at +‎ est with subsequent contraction.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ast

  1. (law, protasis) but if, and if (in double stipulations)
    Synonyms: sīn autem, porrō
  2. (literary, often followed by a vowel) but, however, whereas
    1. while, and
    Synonyms: at, sed
  3. (literary) and then, forthwith, whereupon (followed immediately by a subject switch, normally a personal pronoun)

ReferencesEdit

  • ast” on page 209 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “ast”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 59

Further readingEdit


LivonianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *astudak.

VerbEdit

ast

  1. step

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *ast

NounEdit

ast m

  1. branch

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: ast

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *ast

NounEdit

ast m

  1. branch

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: ast