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AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

VerbEdit

entrar (first-person singular indicative present entro, past participle entráu)

  1. to enter, go in

ConjugationEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Provençal entrar, intrar, from Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

VerbEdit

entrar (first-person singular present entro, past participle entrat)

  1. to enter

ConjugationEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese entrar, intrar, from Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

VerbEdit

entrar (first-person singular present entro, first-person singular preterite entrei, past participle entrado)

  1. to enter
  2. first-person and third-person singular future subjunctive of entrar
  3. first-person and third-person singular personal infinitive of entrar

ConjugationEdit

AntonymsEdit


LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish, from Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

VerbEdit

entrar (Latin spelling)

  1. to enter
  2. to introduce

Derived termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese entrar, intrar, from Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

entrar (first-person singular present indicative entro, past participle entrado)

  1. to enter, to go into

ConjugationEdit

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:entrar.


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish, from Latin intrāre, present active infinitive of intrō.

VerbEdit

entrar (first-person singular present entro, first-person singular preterite entré, past participle entrado)

  1. to enter, to go into, to start

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin intrāre (compare Italian entrare), present active infinitive of intrō.

VerbEdit

entrar

  1. (transitive) to enter
  2. (transitive) to start

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.