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TranslingualEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NumberEdit

ci

  1. A Roman numeral representing one hundred and one (101).

See alsoEdit


Aka (Central Africa)Edit

NounEdit

ci

  1. water

Further readingEdit

  • Marvin Lionel Bender, Topics in Nilo-Saharan linguistics (1989) (cí, cì)
  • [1] (ɕi)

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quem. Compare Portuguese quem, Romanian cine, Spanish quien, Romansch che, Sardinian chíne.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ci

  1. who

DhimalEdit

NounEdit

ci

  1. water

External sourcesEdit

  • John T. King, A Grammar of Dhimal

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian or French tu, Russian ты (ty), etc., plus the i of personal pronouns.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ci (accusative cin, possessive cia)

  1. (archaic) thou
    • 1907, Vallienne, Henri, Kastelo de Prelongo, ch. 6:
      Cia sintenado estos vere fiera, li moke murmuretis en ŝian orelon, kiam ci estos vekinta la tutan loĝantaron.
      Thine attitude shall be truly proud, he mockingly whispered into her ear, when thou shalt have awakened the whole population.

Usage notesEdit

This word has never been in common usage; Zamenhof advised against using 'ci' as early as the Dua Libro de l' Lingvo Internacia, published in 1888. Some authors have used 'ci' to portray archaic language, for translations, and for stylistic effects. This usage is criticized by other writers.

  • Ludwig L. Zamenhof, Dua Libro de l' Lingvo Internacia; Ludwig L. Zamenhof, Lingvaj Respondoj; Bertilo Wennergren, Plena Manlibro de Esperanta Gramatiko (PMEG); Bernard Golden, La Gazeto #11, June 15, 1987; Zlatko Tisjlar, Frekvencmorfemaro de Parolata Esperanto.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of ici (or ceci) or from Old French ci, from Latin ecce hīc.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ci

  1. here
  2. this
    cet homme-cithis man
    Ces choses-cithese things
    Je préfère ce gateau-ci à celui-là.I prefer this cake to that one.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

ci

  1. Alternative form of ici

PronounEdit

ci

  1. Alternative form of ici

InterlinguaEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ci

  1. here (at this place)

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /t͡ʃi/
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Hyphenation: ci

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin (the name of the letter C).

NounEdit

ci f (invariable)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C/c.; cee

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From hīce or *hicce, from hīc (here).

PronounEdit

ci

  1. us.
  2. (reflexive) ourselves
  3. impersonal reflexive pronoun
    Ci vuole poco a farmi felice.
    It doesn't take much to make me happy.
  4. on it, about it, of it

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From hīce or *hicce, from hic.

AdverbEdit

ci

  1. here, there

See alsoEdit


KanuriEdit

NounEdit

ci

  1. mouth

LatinEdit

LojbanEdit

Lojban cardinal numbers
 <  re ci vo  > 
    Cardinal : ci
    Ordinal : cimai
    Adverbial : ciroi
    Distributive : cimei
    Quantified : cimoi
    Higher-Order Ordinal : cimo'o

CmavoEdit

ci (rafsi cib)

  1. three

MalayEdit

 
ci

EtymologyEdit

From Sundanese ᮎᮤ (ci).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ci

  1. river (large stream which drains a landmass)

SynonymsEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

ci

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

NooneEdit

VerbEdit

ci

  1. strike

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ecce hīc.

AdverbEdit

ci

  1. here (in this place)

DescendantsEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronounEdit

ci

  1. Alternative spelling of cía

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ci

  1. short dative singular of ty.
    Daję ci łzy, które spadły z moich oczu.
    I'm giving you the tears that fell from my eyes.

Related termsEdit

PronounEdit

ci

  1. personal masculine plural of ten
    ci mężczyźni
    these men

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ce.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ci

  1. (adversative) but; so that; on the contrary, opposite
    Nici eu, ci el.Not I, but he.

See alsoEdit


SicilianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin hīc via Vulgar Latin *hīcce. Compare Italian ci.

AdverbEdit

ci

  1. here, there

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

ci

  1. dative form of iddu (he); to him
  2. dative form of idda (she); to her
  3. dative form of iddi (they); to them
InflectionEdit
3rd person m f pl
nominative iddu idda iddi
prepositional iddu idda iddi
accusative lu la li
dative ci ci ci
reflexive si si si

Usage notesEdit
  • Unlike in Italian, the Sicilian pronoun ci is not used for the first-person plural ('us'). The Sicilian equivalent is ni.

TarantinoEdit

PronounEdit

ci (relative)

  1. who

VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quis (compare Italian chi).

PronounEdit

ci (interrogative)

  1. who?

Usage notesEdit

  • Redoubled for reinforcement.
    Ci èlo ci?
    Who on earth is he?

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French cel, from Latin ecce illum (< ille).

DeterminerEdit

ci

  1. this

PronounEdit

ci

  1. this

WelshEdit

 
Welsh Corgi dog

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Brythonic *ki, from Proto-Celtic *kū, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱwṓ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ci m (plural cŵn)

  1. dog

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ci gi nghi chi
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

White HmongEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ci

  1. to cook, to roast, to toast
  2. to glow, to shine