See also: Gran, Grän, grań, grán, gràn, grãn, and grån

English

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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gran (plural grans)

  1. (informal, usually affectionate) A grandmother.
  2. (rare) A grandfather. (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Translations

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Anagrams

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Aragonese

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Etymology

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From Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɾan/
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Syllabification: gran

Adjective

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gran (plural grans)

  1. big

References

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  • grande”, in Aragonario, diccionario castellano–aragonés (in Spanish)

Asturian

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Adjective

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gran

  1. (apocopic, before a singular noun) Alternative form of grande, big

Catalan

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Catalan gran, from Latin grandis, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ghrewə- (to fell, put down, fall in).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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gran m or f (masculine and feminine plural grans)

  1. big, large
    Antonym: petit
  2. (of a person) old
    Antonym: jove
    la gent gran : aged people, elders
    els grans : (only generic masculine plural, as said by children) the adults
  3. (of a person) older; oldest, eldest, senior
    • 2020 February 10, Daniel Bonaventura, “"Necessito abraçades i petons" ["I need hugs and kisses"]”, in Ara[1]:
      -Hola, mare! Qui soc?
      -En Joan.
      -No, no. No soc en Joan. Soc el teu fill gran. Com es diu el teu fill gran?
      -Daniel -encara mira a terra.
      "Hello, mother! Who am I?"
      "Joan."
      "No, no. I'm not Joan. I'm your oldest son. What's the name of your oldest son?
      "Daniel." She's still looking at the ground.
  4. great (very large)
  5. great (important)

Derived terms

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Noun

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gran m (plural grans)

  1. (in the plural) adults, grown-ups

Further reading

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Friulian

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Etymology

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From Latin grānum.

Noun

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gran m (plural grans)

  1. wheat, corn
  2. grain
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Galician

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Etymology 1

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From Old Galician-Portuguese gran, from Latin grandis.

Adjective

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gran m or f (apocopate)

  1. Apocopic form of grande (great)
    Gran Bretaña - Great Britain
    Gran Premio - Grand Prix
Usage notes
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It is used, instead of grande, when preceding singular names whose first sound is a consonant

Etymology 2

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From Old Galician-Portuguese grão, from Latin grānum. Cognate with Portuguese grão, Spanish grano, and Catalan gra.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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gran m (plural grans)

  1. (uncountable) grain, the seed of grass food crops
    • 1396, M. Romaní Martínez, editor, La colección diplomática de Santa María de Oseira, Santiago: Tórculo Edicións, IV; page 449:
      E nos dedes del de cada anno em paz et em salvo en a ayra do dito casar quarta de todo pan e grao que Deus em el der
      and you shall give us each year, pacifically and safely, in the threshing ground of that farm, a quarter of all the bread and the grain that God there gives
  2. (countable) grain, seed, kernel, bean, a single seed of certain crops
  3. (countable) grain, a single similar particle of various substances
  4. (historical, countable) grano, Spanish grain, a traditional unit of mass equivalent to about 50 mg
  5. (countable) grain, any of various traditional units of mass notionally based on the weight of various grains
  6. (figurative, countable) speck, ounce, any extremely small quantity or amount
    Synonym: pisca
    • 1775, María Francisca Isla y Losada, Romance:
      Tamen bay ese tabeque
      meu velliño, pois fungàs
      que cada grao de èl gorenta,
      con eso as fremas sairàn.
      Also there it goes this tobacco,
      my little old man, since you snivel:
      each grain of it is delectable,
      with this phlegms will go out.
  7. (countable) pimple, blackhead, a blocked skin pore, especially with a painful and pus-filled inflamation
    Synonym: espiña
  8. (uncountable) grain, the linear surface texture of various substances
    Synonym: textura
Derived terms
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References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “grão”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “gran”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • gran” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • gran” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • gran” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • gran” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɡran/
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Hyphenation: gràn

Adjective

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gran m or f (apocopate)

  1. Apocopic form of grande
    Gran Bretagna - Great Britain
    Gran Premio - Grand Prix
    gran turismo - grand touring

Ladin

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Etymology

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From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

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gran m (feminine singular granda, masculine plural gragn, feminine plural grandes)

  1. large; great

Mauritian Creole

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Etymology

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From French grand.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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gran

  1. great
  2. grown-up
  3. big
  4. tall

Norwegian Bokmål

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 gran on Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia
 
gran

Etymology

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From Danish gran, from Old Norse grǫn (spruce, pine tree), from Proto-Germanic *granō (awn, bristles), fFrom Proto-Indo-European *gʰroH-néh₂-.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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gran f or m (definite singular grana or granen, indefinite plural graner, definite plural granene)

  1. spruce (mostly the species Picea abies (Norway spruce)).
  2. spruce (wood from spruce trees)

Hypernyms

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Derived terms

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References

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“gran” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Norse grǫn (spruce or pine tree), whence also gron (muzzle; animal lips). From Proto-Germanic *granō (awn, bristles), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰroH-néh₂-. Cognate with Faroese gron, Icelandic grön, and Swedish and Danish gran.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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gran f (definite singular grana, indefinite plural graner, definite plural granene)

  1. spruce (mostly the species Picea abies (Norway spruce)).
  2. spruce (wood from spruce trees)

Derived terms

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References

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  • “gran” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “gran” in Ivar Aasen (1873) Norsk Ordbog med dansk Forklaring

Occitan

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Etymology 1

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From Old Occitan gran, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

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gran

  1. big; large
Alternative forms
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Etymology 2

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From Latin grānum.

Noun

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gran m (plural grans)

  1. grain

Old Galician-Portuguese

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From grande, from Latin grandis, grandem.

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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gran

  1. big

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Fala: gran
  • Galician: gran
  • Portuguese: grão

Old Occitan

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Etymology

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From Latin grandis, grandem.

Adjective

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gran m or f (plural grans)

  1. big; large

Descendants

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Russian гран (gran).

Noun

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gran n (plural grane)

  1. (obsolete) grain (unit of weight)

Declension

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References

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  • gran in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

Spanish

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Etymology

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From Old Spanish grant, grand, apocopic forms of grande (great). Other apocopic forms inherited from Old Spanish include primer, san and según.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɾan/ [ˈɡɾãn]
  • Rhymes: -an
  • Syllabification: gran

Adjective

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gran m or f (apocopate, standard form grande)

  1. (before the noun) Apocopic form of grande; great.

Usage notes

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  • The form gran is used only before and within the noun phrase of the modified singular noun. Elsewhere, grande is used instead.

Further reading

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Swedish

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Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old Norse grǫn. First attested in the early 14th century[1].

Noun

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gran c

  1. spruce (mostly the species Picea abies or Norway spruce, the species found most often in Sweden)
Declension
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Declension of gran 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative gran granen granar granarna
Genitive grans granens granars granarnas

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Medieval Latin grānum (smallest unit of weight), derived from Latin grānum (grain; seed). First attested in 1497[2].

Noun

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gran c

  1. (historical) A Swedish grain at 0.297 mm; 110 of a nylinje (2.97 mm) or 10 skrupel (29.7 µm).
    Coordinate terms: rev, stång, fot, decimaltum, nylinje, gran, skrupel
  2. (historical, pharmacy) A Swedish grain at 61.85 mg, 1/20th of a skrupel (1.237 g).
    Coordinate terms: liber, uns, drakma, skrupel, gran
    • 1860 August 11, “Botmedel mot kolera [Cure for cholera]”, in Skara Nya Tidning:
      Alla de, ſom under ſjukdomen dagligen intogo 2 gran etiope, blefwo bewarade ifrån ſjukdomen.
      All those who, during the disease, took 2 grain of ethiope daily, were preserved from the disease.

References

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Further reading

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Anagrams

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