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Etymology 1Edit

From Latin primarius and primarium (prayer book) possibly via Anglo-Norman primer (prayer book), from prima (prime the liturgical hour and office) + -arius and -arium (forming related objects). Its use for schoolbooks derived from the late medieval and early modern use of such prayer books to teach reading.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

primer (plural primers)

  1. (historical, Catholicism ecclesiastical) A prayer or devotional book intended for laity, initially an abridgment of the breviary and manual including the hours of the Virgin Mary, 15 gradual and 7 penitential psalms, the litany, the placebo and dirige forming the office of the dead, and the commendations.
  2. (historical, Protestant ecclesiastical) Similar works issued in England for private prayer in accordance with the Book of Common Prayer.
  3. A children's book intended to teach literacy: how to read, write, and spell.
    • 1545, The A.B.C. Primers
  4. An introductory text on any subject, particularly basic concepts.
  5. (New Zealand) An elementary school class; an elementary school student.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

prime +‎ -er.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

primer (countable and uncountable, plural primers)

  1. Any substance or device, such as priming wire or blasting cap, used to ignite gunpowder or other explosive.
    • 1912, United States Army Ordnance Dept, Handbook of the 2.95-inch mountain gun mate/riel and pack outfit, →ISBN, page 17:
      The percussion primer, known as the “ 110-grain percussion primer,” contains an igniting charge of 95 grains of black powder in addition to the essential elements of a percussion primer.
    • 2003, Sam Fadala, The Gun Digest Blackpowder Loading Manual, →ISBN, page 73:
      Therefore, the shotgun primer is quite self- contained. It consists of a separate metal cup called a battery cup that contains the primer itself. That's why it is considered a two-piece primer.
    • 2016, Steve Sieberts, Gun Digest Shooter's Guide to Competitive Pistol Shooting, →ISBN, page 224:
      Take care when handling primers, especially ensure that your fingers are free of oil or dirt. Oil can affect the detonating properties of the primer pellet, and can be the cause of misfires if too much oil gets into the primer.
  2. (obsolete, rare) A person who primes explosives.
  3. A substance used to prime wood, metal, etc. in preparation for painting.
  4. A layer of such a substance.
  5. A layer of makeup that goes beneath the foundation; undermakeup.
    • 1989, Stan Place & ‎Bobbi Ray Madry, The Art and Science of Professional Makeup, →ISBN, page 95:
      The undermakeup (primer) should be allowed to dry-set for 30 seconds. Apply foundation over the primer with a sponge using light, careful strokes to blend. Undermakeups come in cream form, sponge-on wands, or sponge-on cream, and as a lotion.
  6. (obsolete, rare) A person who primes wood, metal, etc.
  7. (biochemistry) A molecule which initiates the synthesis of an enzyme, (especially) a single-stranded nucleic acid molecule which initiates DNA replication.
  8. (medicine, zoology) A pheromone which interacts first with the endocrine system.
  9. A device used to prime an internal combustion engine with gasoline, (especially) in airplanes.
  10. A person who prunes trees.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 3Edit

From Anglo-Norman primer (first), from Latin prīmārius (first)

AdjectiveEdit

primer (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) First in time, initial, early.
    • (Can we date this quote by Drayton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      the primer English kings
  2. (obsolete) First in importance, premier.
  3. (obsolete, rare) First in position, foremost.
Derived termsEdit

CatalanEdit

Catalan ordinal numbers
1r 2n  > 
    Cardinal : un
    Ordinal : primer

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin prīmārius.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

primer (feminine primera, masculine plural primers, feminine plural primeres)

  1. first
  2. (mathematics) prime (having no divisor except itself and 1):

Usage notesEdit

When primer is the ordinal number of a century or of a regnal name of a monarch or pope, it is written using Roman numerals following the noun. Thus Joan Primer is written Joan I.

For most fractional numbers, the ordinal number is used to indicate the denominator of the fraction. Since 1 is never the denominator of a proper fraction, primer is not normally used to form fractions. Exceptions to this rule include mig (half), terç (third), quarter (quarter), milionèsim (millionth), bilionèsim (billionth), ....

The feminine form of the ordinal is usually used as the collective noun for a set of like objects of that size. Primera is not used for a set of 1, nor is there is any other term for the concept Exceptions to the usual rule include parell (set of 2), qüern (set of 4), centenar (set of 100), grossa (set of 144), miler (set of 1000), and milenar (1000).

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

primer

  1. first; before anything else

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

primer

  1. to dominate, to be dominant over
  2. to win (a prize)
  3. to prevail, take precedent

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German primär, from French primaire, from Latin primarius.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈprimɛr]
  • Hyphenation: pri‧mer

AdjectiveEdit

primer (comparative primerebb, superlative legprimerebb)

  1. primary
    primer feszültségprimary voltage

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -e-, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative primer primerek
accusative primert primereket
dative primernek primereknek
instrumental primerrel primerekkel
causal-final primerért primerekért
translative primerré primerekké
terminative primerig primerekig
essive-formal primerként primerekként
essive-modal
inessive primerben primerekben
superessive primeren primereken
adessive primernél primereknél
illative primerbe primerekbe
sublative primerre primerekre
allative primerhez primerekhez
elative primerből primerekből
delative primerről primerekről
ablative primertől primerektől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
primeré primereké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
primeréi primerekéi

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

primer m (oblique and nominative feminine singular primere)

  1. Alternative form of premier

AdverbEdit

primer

  1. Alternative form of premier

NounEdit

primer m (oblique plural primers, nominative singular primers, nominative plural primer)

  1. Alternative form of premier
  2. (Anglo-Norman) primer (hymn book)

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /prǐːmer/
  • Hyphenation: pri‧mer

NounEdit

prímer m (Cyrillic spelling при́мер)

  1. example, instance
  2. model, paragon
  3. precedence

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SloveneEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

primẹ̑r m inan

  1. example (something representative of a group)

InflectionEdit

Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. primér
gen. sing. priméra
singular dual plural
nominative primér priméra priméri
accusative primér priméra primére
genitive priméra primérov primérov
dative priméru priméroma primérom
locative priméru primérih primérih
instrumental primérom priméroma priméri

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

primer m (apocopate, standard form primero)

  1. (before the noun) Apocopic form of primero (first)
    El primer hijo - “the first child”

Usage notesEdit

  • The form primer is only used before and within the noun phrase of a modified masculine singular noun. In other positions, the standard form primero is used instead.