See also: Hump

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably borrowed from Dutch homp (hump, lump) or Middle Low German hump (heap, hill, stump), from Old Saxon *hump (hill, heap, thick piece), from Proto-Germanic *humpaz (hip, height), from Proto-Indo-European *kumb- (curved).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Canada, UK) IPA(key): /hʌmp/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌmp
Camels have humps on their backs.

NounEdit

hump (plural humps)

  1. A mound of earth.
  2. A speed hump.
  3. A deformity in humans caused by abnormal curvature of the upper spine.
  4. (animals) A rounded fleshy mass, such as on a camel or zebu.
  5. (slang) An act of sexual intercourse.
  6. (Britain, slang, with definite article) A bad mood.
    She's got the hump with me.
    Go away! You're giving me the right hump.
  7. (slang) A painfully boorish person.
    That guy is such a hump!
  8. A wave that forms in front of an operating hovercraft and impedes progress at low speeds.

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TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

hump (third-person singular simple present humps, present participle humping, simple past and past participle humped)

  1. (transitive) To bend something into a hump.
    • 1885, Roosevelt, Theodore, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman:
      The cattle were very uncomfortable, standing humped up in the bushes.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To carry (something), especially with some exertion.
  3. to rhythmically thrust the pelvis in a manner conducive to sexual intercourse
    1. (transitive, intransitive) To dry-hump.
      Stop humping the table, you sicko.
    2. (transitive, intransitive) To have sex (with).
  4. (US, slang, dated) To prepare for a great exertion; to put forth effort.
  5. (slang, dated) To vex or annoy.
  6. (rail transport) To shunt wagons / freight cars over the hump in a hump yard.
    • 1960 July, G. Freeman Allen, “Margam yard - the most modern in Europe”, in Trains Illustrated, pages 405, 407:
      In the first phase of the new yard's operation, from March 6 last, it was wisely decided to restrict the yard's use to allow for any "teething" ailments with complex electronic gadgets, so when I visited Margam early in May it was working well below its capacity, humping about 1,000 wagons a day; [...].

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Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly related to Low German humpel, compare with English hump.

NounEdit

hump m (definite singular humpen, indefinite plural humper, definite plural humpene)

  1. a bump or hump (e.g. in a road)

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Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Possibly related to Low German humpel, compare with English hump.

NounEdit

hump m (definite singular humpen, indefinite plural humpar, definite plural humpane)

  1. a bump or hump (e.g. in a road)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit