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AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *mentīre, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior.

VerbEdit

mentir (first-person singular indicative present mento, past participle mentíu)

  1. to lie (tell an intentional untruth)

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan mentir, from Vulgar Latin *mentīre, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior.

VerbEdit

mentir (first-person singular present menteixo, past participle mentit)

  1. to lie (say something untrue)

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Plural form of Old Norse ment (education, art).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mentir f pl (plurale tantum, genitive plural menta)

  1. art, capability, skill
  2. (spiritual) culture
  3. (archaic) wizardry, witchcraft
  4. (archaic) power

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mentir (plural only)
f2p plural
indefinite definite
nominative mentir mentirnar
accusative mentir mentirnar
dative mentum mentunum
genitive menta mentanna

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French mentir, from Old French mentir, from Vulgar Latin *mentiō, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɑ̃.tiʁ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iʁ

VerbEdit

mentir

  1. to lie (say something untrue)
    Il ne faut pas se mentir : l'entreprise s'annonce difficile. – Let's not kid ourselves: ...

ConjugationEdit

This is one of a fairly large group of irregular -ir verbs that are all conjugated the same way. Other members of this group include sortir and dormir. The most significant difference between these verbs' conjugation and that of the regular -ir verbs is that these verbs' conjugation does not use the infix -iss-. Further, this conjugation has the forms (je, tu) mens and (il) ment in the present indicative and imperative, whereas a regular -ir verb would have *mentis and *mentit (as in the past historic).

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mentir, from Vulgar Latin *mentīre, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /menˈtiɾ/, (popular) /minˈtiɾ/

VerbEdit

mentir (first-person singular present minto, first-person singular preterite mentín, past participle mentido)

  1. to lie (say something untrue)
    • 1370, Ramón Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 672:
      Et se uós, dom Ulixas, dizedes que auedes y mayor dereyto ca eu, dígouos que me mentides
      And in case that you, lord Ulysses, would say that you have more rights than me in this, then I'll tell you that you lie to me
  2. (cattle) to exceed the expected calving time

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • mentir” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • mentir” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • mentir” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • mentir” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

InterlinguaEdit

VerbEdit

mentir

  1. to lie

ConjugationEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mentir, from Vulgar Latin *mentīre, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior.

VerbEdit

mentir

  1. to lie (say something untrue)

DescendantsEdit

  • French: mentir

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *mentīre, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior.

VerbEdit

mentir

  1. to lie (say something untrue)

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *mentīre, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior.

VerbEdit

mentir

  1. to lie (say something untrue)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese mentir (to lie), from Vulgar Latin *mentīre, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior, denominal verb from mēns, mentis (mind) in which the meaning "to lie" stems from a semantic shift "to be inventive, have second thoughts" > "to lie, conjure up", from Proto-Indo-European *méntis (thought), from *men- (to think) +‎ *-tis.

VerbEdit

mentir (first-person singular present indicative minto, past participle mentido)

  1. to lie (say something untrue)

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From *mentīre, from Latin mentīrī, present active infinitive of mentior.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /menˈtiɾ/, [mẽn̪ˈt̪iɾ]

VerbEdit

mentir (first-person singular present miento, first-person singular preterite mentí, past participle mentido)

  1. to lie (say something untrue)
    Me mientes.
    You're lying to me.

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: e becomes a ie in stressed syllables and i in certain conjugations.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit