See also: COP, còp, côp, cöp, cọp, çöp, čop, and чоп

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English coppe, from Old English *coppe, as in ātorcoppe (spider, literally venom head), from Old English copp (top, summit, head), from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (vault, round vessel, head), from Proto-Indo-European *gū- (to bend, curve). Cognate with Middle Dutch koppe, kobbe (spider). More at cobweb.

NounEdit

cop (plural cops)

  1. (obsolete) A spider.

Etymology 2Edit

Uncertain. Perhaps from Old English copian (to plunder; pillage; steal); or possibly from Middle French caper (to capture), from Latin capiō (to seize, to grasp); or possibly from Dutch kapen (to seize, to hijack), from Old Frisian kāpia (to buy). Compare also Middle English copen (to buy), from Middle Dutch copen.

VerbEdit

cop (third-person singular simple present cops, present participle copping, simple past and past participle copped)

  1. (transitive, formerly dialect, now informal) To obtain, to purchase (as in drugs), to get hold of, to take.
    • 1995, Norman L. Russell, ‎Doug Grad, Suicide Charlie: A Vietnam War Story (page 191)
      He sold me a bulging paper sack full of Cambodian Red for two dolla' MPC. A strange experience, copping from a kid, but it was righteous weed.
    • 2005, Martin Torgoff, Can't Find My Way Home, Simon & Schuster, page 10:
      Heroin appeared on the streets of our town for the first time, and Innie watched helplessly as his sixteen-year-old brother began taking the train to Harlem to cop smack.
  2. (transitive) To (be forced to) take; to receive; to shoulder; to bear, especially blame or punishment for a particular instance of wrongdoing.
    When caught, he would often cop a vicious blow from his father
  3. (transitive, trainspotting, slang) To see and record a railway locomotive for the first time.
  4. (transitive) To steal.
  5. (transitive) To adopt.
    No need to cop a 'tude with me, junior.
  6. (transitive) To earn by bad behavior.
    • 1992, Roxanne Shanté (lyrics), “Straight Razor”, in The Bitch Is Back:
      You bust in the house, another bitch’s mouth is suckin on your man's dick
      What do you do: think straight? Or do you run to the back,
      Open the trunk to the nickel-plate 38?
      “Wait wait, baby, please!”
      That's the shit he's coppin when he’s down on both his knees
  7. (intransitive, usually with “to”, slang) to admit, especially to a crime.
    I already copped to the murder. What else do you want from me?
    Harold copped to being known as "Dirty Harry".
    • 2005, Elmore Leonard, Mr. Paradise, page 295:
      He shot a guy in a bar on Martin Luther King Day and copped to first-degree manslaughter
  8. (transitive, slang) For a pimp to recruit a prostitute into the stable.
    • 2009, Iceberg Slim, Pimp (page 90)
      I said, 'Tell your tricks to call you here.'
      She laid the bearskin and freaked the joint off with her lights and other crap. Except for the fake stars it was a fair mock-up of her pad where I had copped her.
    • 2011, Shaheem Hargrove, ‎Sharice Cuthrell, The Rise and Fall of a Ghetto Celebrity (page 55)
      The code was to call a pimp and tell him you have his hoe plus turn over her night trap but that was bull because the HOE was out of his stable months before I copped her.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Short for copper (police officer), itself from cop (one who cops) above, in reference to arresting criminals.

NounEdit

cop (plural cops)

  1. (slang, law enforcement) A police officer or prison guard.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Middle English cop, coppe, from Old English cop, copp, from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz (vault, basin, round object), from Proto-Indo-European *gu-. Cognate with Dutch kop, German Kopf.

NounEdit

cop (plural cops)

  1. (crafts) The ball of thread wound on to the spindle in a spinning machine.
  2. (obsolete) The top, summit, especially of a hill.
  3. (obsolete) The crown (of the head); also the head itself. [14th-15th c.]
    The stature is bowed down in age, the cop is depressed.
  4. A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.
  5. (architecture, military) A merlon.

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


A-PucikwarEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Great Andamanese *cup

NounEdit

cop

  1. basket

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan colp, from Late Latin colpus (stroke), from earlier Latin colaphus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cop m (plural cops)

  1. hit, blow, strike
  2. time, occasion

Alternative formsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German Zopf.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cop m

  1. braid

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

A shortened form of copain.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cop m (plural cops)

  1. (informal) A friend, a pal.

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English cop, from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cop (plural coppes)

  1. summit (of a mountain or hill)
  2. top, tip, topmost part
  3. top of the head, crown
  4. head

DescendantsEdit

  • English: cop
  • Scots: cop, coppe
  • Welsh: copa

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

cop m (oblique plural cos, nominative singular cos, nominative plural cop)

  1. Alternative form of colp

Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish copp, borrowed from either Old English copp or Middle English copp, both meaning "top," from Proto-Germanic *kuppaz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cop m (genitive singular coip, plural coip)

  1. foam, froth

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

cop (past chop, future copidh, verbal noun copadh, past participle copte)

  1. capsize
  2. pour out, tip out
  3. foam, froth

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
cop chop
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Zopf.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cop m (genitive singular copu, nominative plural copy, genitive plural copov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. braid

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • cop in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

cop (nominative plural cops)

  1. hoe (tool)

DeclensionEdit


WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English coppe (spider).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cop m (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) spider
    Synonyms: copyn, corryn, pryf cop, pryf copyn

Usage notesEdit

No longer found as an independent word, cop is now used as an element in other words for "spider", such as copyn, pryf cop and pryf copyn and derived terms.

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cop gop nghop chop
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “cop”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies