CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Catalan pregar, from Latin precārī.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pregar (first-person singular present prego, past participle pregat)

  1. to pray, ask humbly (to a person)
  2. to pray (to God)

Usage notesEdit

In its religious sense, the verb pregar is now less common than resar, especially when speaking of non-Christian religions.

ConjugationEdit

as cantar, except that the g of the radical becomes gu before e or i in the ending

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese pregar, a semi-learned term taken from Latin plicāre, present active infinitive of plicō (I fold). See also chegar, an inherited doublet.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pregar (first-person singular present prego, first-person singular preterite preguei, past participle pregado)

  1. (transitive) to fold
  2. (transitive, dated) to nail
  3. (of fire) to fire, burn
ConjugationEdit

(deprecated template usage)

  • Note: preg- are changed to pregu- before front vowels (e).
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese pregar (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Vulgar Latin *precāre, from Latin precārī, present active infinitive of precor.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pregar (first-person singular present prego, first-person singular preterite preguei, past participle pregado)

  1. to pray, ask humbly (to a person)
  2. to pray (to God)
ConjugationEdit

(deprecated template usage)

  • Note: preg- are changed to pregu- before front vowels (e).
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese preegar, from Latin praedicāre, present active infinitive of praedicō (I proclaim). Doublet of predicar.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pregar (first-person singular present prego, first-person singular preterite preguei, past participle pregado)

  1. (archaic) to preach; to proclaim
    • 1390, J. L. Pensado Tomé (ed.), Os Miragres de Santiago. Madrid: C.S.I.C., page 47:
      Quando aquel Ihesus, meu señor, ya por la terras preegar, eu avia de moy grãde amor et soydade de veer a sua façe et quigi mãdar pintar a semelança do seu rrostro, que era a mays fremosa criatura do mũdo, en hũu pano por fillar cõ ela prazer et cõforto quando o vise; et querendoo fazer cõteyllo todo, et el pediome o pano et posoo ẽna sua cara et doumo encayado cõ tal figura cal era o seu santo rrostro;
      When that Jesus, my Lord, was going about the lands preaching, I had, because of how big was my love, longing for seeing His face; and I wanted to order a paint after His face, which was the most beautiful creation in the world, in a cloth, for having joy and confort whenever I saw it; and wanting to do it I told him, and He asked me for the cloth, put it on His face and gave it back to me stuck with a figure that was no other than His holy face;
ConjugationEdit

(deprecated template usage)

  • Note: preg- are changed to pregu- before front vowels (e).
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • pregar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • preegar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006–2022.
  • preg” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • preeg” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006–2018.
  • pregar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • pregar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • pregar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French prierItalian pregare. Compare Esperanto preĝi.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pregar (present tense pregas, past tense pregis, future tense pregos, imperative pregez, conditional pregus)

  1. (transitive, religion) to pray (to)
  2. (transitive) to beg, entreat, beseech

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan pregar, from Latin precārī.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɾeˈɣa/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

pregar

  1. to pray
  2. to ask, politely request

Derived termsEdit

Dialectal variantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin precārī.

VerbEdit

pregar

  1. to pray (as to God)

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese pregar, a semi-learned term taken from Latin plicō (to fold), from Proto-Indo-European *pleḱ- (to plait, to weave). See also chegar, an inherited doublet.

PronunciationEdit

 

  • Hyphenation: pre‧gar

VerbEdit

pregar (first-person singular present prego, first-person singular preterite preguei, past participle pregado)

  1. to nail (employ a nail or similar object as a fastener)
    Synonym: martelar
    Antonym: despregar
  2. to stare
    Synonym: encarar
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Portuguese preegar, from Latin praedicāre (to proclaim), from prae (before, in front) + dicō (devote, consecrate).

PronunciationEdit

 

  • Hyphenation: pre‧gar

VerbEdit

pregar (first-person singular present prego, first-person singular preterite preguei, past participle pregado)

  1. to preach (give a sermon)
    Synonym: proferir
  2. to preach; to advocate (encourage support)
    Synonyms: difundir, preconizar
  3. inflection of pregar:
    1. first-person singular future subjunctive
    2. third-person singular future subjunctive
    3. first-person singular personal infinitive
    4. third-person singular personal infinitive
ConjugationEdit

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɾeˈɡaɾ/, [pɾeˈɣ̞aɾ]

VerbEdit

pregar (first-person singular present prego, first-person singular preterite pregué, past participle pregado)

  1. (obsolete) to fix; to join

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit