EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English inward, from Old English inweard, corresponding to in +‎ -ward.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɪnwəd/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

inward (comparative more inward, superlative most inward)

  1. Situated on the inside; that is within, inner; belonging to the inside. [from 9th c.]
  2. (obsolete) Intimate, closely acquainted; familiar. [16th-17th c.]
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 3, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes, [], book II, printed at London: By Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], OCLC 946730821:
      There is nothing can be added unto the daintinesse of Fulvius wives death, who was so inward with Augustus.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Bible, Job xix. 19
      All my inward friends abhorred me.
    • (Can we date this quote by Sir Philip Sidney and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      He had had occasion, by one very inward with him, to know in part the discourse of his life.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

inward (comparative more inward, superlative most inward)

  1. Towards the inside. [from 11th c.]
    • (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      So much the rather, thou Celestial Light, / Shine inward.
    • 2005, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, David Kessler, On Grief and Grieving, →ISBN, page 16:
      You also may experience feelings of guilt, which is anger turned inward on yourself.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

inward (plural inwards)

  1. (obsolete, chiefly in the plural) That which is inward or within; the inner parts or organs of the body; the viscera.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jeremy Taylor to this entry?)
    • (Can we date this quote by John Milton and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      Then sacrificing, laid the inwards and their fat.
  2. (obsolete, chiefly in the plural) The mental faculties.
  3. (obsolete) A familiar friend or acquaintance.


Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for inward in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English inweard; equivalent to in +‎ -ward.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈinward/, /ˈinwaːrd/

AdverbEdit

inward

  1. inwards, to the interior, especially referring to:
    1. One's physical existence or body
    2. One's mental state or soul
  2. While located within the inside of an entity, especially referring to:
    1. One's physical existence or body
    2. One's mental state or soul

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: inward
  • Scots: inward

ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inward (superlative ynwardest)

  1. inside, inward, in the interior; the following special senses exist:
    1. For the inside; internal
    2. religious, inside the mind
  2. emotionally powerful, emotionally true
  3. unknown, esoteric

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

inward (plural inwardes)

  1. The interior of a given thing
  2. innards; guts
  3. reasoning, deductive ability

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

PrepositionEdit

inward

  1. To the inside

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit