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See also: Nes, NES, nés, -nes, and n'es

Contents

AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdverbEdit

nes

  1. like; just like
    Nes jy, is ek klaar met skool.
    Just like you, I am done with school.
  2. as soon as; just as something is about to do something
    Jy moet skiet nes hy omdraai.
    You must shoot as soon as he turns around.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

nes (plural neste, diminutive nessie)

  1. nest, structure made out of twigs, mud, grass, etc.
  2. nest; a group of animals or insects that live together within a nest
  3. home or house, usually untidy or cluttered

VerbEdit

nes (present nes, present participle nestende, past participle genes)

  1. to nest; to inhabit a nest

AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

A compound ne-s, from *nō kwe. From Proto-Albanian *(e)nō ̊, from Proto-Indo-European *(h1)nē̆-, *(h1)nō̆- (after, behind, next to/after). Cognate to Welsh neithiwr (last night), Breton neizœr (id), Ancient Greek ἔνη(ς) (énē(s)), ἔνας (énas, the day after tomorrow) and Gothic 𐌽𐌴𐍈 (nēƕ, after).

AdverbEdit

nes

  1. after, next after
Derived termsEdit

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a contraction of the preposition en (in) + feminine plural article les (the).

ContractionEdit

nes f pl (masculine sg nel, feminine sg na, neuter sg no, masculine plural nos)

  1. in the

DutchEdit

NounEdit

nes f (plural nessen, diminutive nesje n)

  1. headland, spit

SynonymsEdit


FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse nes (headland). Kindred words are Old English næs (English ness and naze); the Swedish näs,the German nase; the Latin nasus (a nose) as the Icelandic nös (nose).

NounEdit

nes n (genitive singular nes, plural nes)

  1. a headland, a cape, a ness projecting to the sea or lake, a promontory
  2. peninsula

DeclensionEdit

n11s/n22p Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative nes nesið nes nesini
Accusative nes nesið nes nesini
Dative nesi nesinum nes(j)um nes(j)unum
Genitive nes nesins nesja nesjanna

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Føroysk orðabók, 1998

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse nes (headland). Kindred words are Old English næs (English ness and naze); the Swedish näs,the German nase; the Latin nasus (a nose) as the Icelandic nös (the nostril).

NounEdit

nes n (genitive singular ness, nominative plural nes)

  1. a headland, a cape, a ness projecting to the sea or lake, a promontory

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Ensk Vasaorðabók, Orðabókaútgáfan 1985

LatinEdit

LithuanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From an older nesà or nėsà, which Ford interprets as ne- + *so; the latter element being from Proto-Indo-European *so (conjunctve particle);[1] compare Hittite 𒋗 (šu-, preterite conjunctive particle), Old Irish se (conjunctive particle), ultimately deriving most likely from the Proto-Indo-European demonstrative *só, *séh₂, *tód. See tas for more. The further parallel drawn by Ford with Hittite 𒈾𒀸𒋗 (naššu, or) is neither supported nor ruled out by Kloekhorst.[2]

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /nʲɛs/

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ConjunctionEdit

nès

  1. (subordinating) because, since (expresses the reason for an action)
    Àš studijúoju, nès nóriu mókytis. - I study because I want to learn.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gordon B Ford, Jr. (1965), 'A Note on Lithuanian "nes"', Die Sprache, volume 11 (1–2), pages 136–137.
  2. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, ISBN 978-90-04-16092-7, page 689

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

nes m (oblique plural nes, nominative singular nes, nominative plural nes)

  1. (anatomy) Alternative form of nés

Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

nes n

  1. headland

ReferencesEdit

  • nes in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader) nas

EtymologyEdit

From Latin nāsus, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

NounEdit

nes m

  1. (anatomy, Puter) nose

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English nurse.

NounEdit

nes

  1. nurse

WelshEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nes (superlative nesaf)

  1. nearer

ConjunctionEdit

nes

  1. until
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

nes

  1. (colloquial) first-person singular preterite of gwneud

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ J. Morris Jones, A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative (Oxford 1913), § 51 vi.