Afrikaans edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Contraction of net soos.

Adverb edit

nes

  1. like; just like
    Nes jy, is ek klaar met skool.
    Just like you, I am done with school.
  2. as soon as; just as something is about to do something
    Jy moet skiet nes hy omdraai.
    You must shoot as soon as he turns around.
Synonyms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Dutch nest, from Middle Dutch nest, from Old Dutch nest, from Proto-Germanic *nestaz, from Proto-Indo-European *nisdós.

Noun edit

nes (plural neste, diminutive nessie)

  1. nest, structure made out of twigs, mud, grass, etc.
  2. nest; a group of animals or insects that live together within a nest
  3. home or house, usually untidy or cluttered

Verb edit

nes (present nes, present participle nestende, past participle genes)

  1. to nest; to inhabit a nest

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

A compound *ne +‎ *-s, from Proto-Indo-European *nō kwe. From Proto-Albanian *(e)nō ̊, from Proto-Indo-European *(h1)nē̆-, *(h1)nō̆- (after, behind, next to/after). Cognate to Ancient Greek ἔνη(ς) (énē(s)), ἔνας (énas, the day after tomorrow) and Gothic 𐌽𐌴𐍈 (nēƕ, after).

Adverb edit

nes

  1. after, next after

Derived terms edit

Aromanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Probably from an earlier form *cun ãsu, from Vulgar Latin *cum ipso, from *ipsus or Latin ipsum, from ipse, or from metathesis of a form *ãns. Compare Romanian dânsul, îns.

Pronoun edit

nes m (feminine nese, masculine plural nesh, feminine plural nesi)

  1. (third-person masculine singular pronoun) he

Synonyms edit

See also edit

  • mini (first-person singular)
  • tini (second-person singular)
  • noi (first-person plural)
  • voi (second-person plural)
  • nesh, ei (third-person (masculine or mixed) plural)

Asturian edit

Etymology edit

From a contraction of the preposition en (in) + feminine plural article les (the).

Contraction edit

nes f pl (masculine sg nel, feminine sg na, neuter sg no, masculine plural nos)

  1. in the

Cypriot Arabic edit

Etymology edit

From Arabicنَاس(nās).

Noun edit

nes pl

  1. people

References edit

  • Borg, Alexander (2004) A Comparative Glossary of Cypriot Maronite Arabic (Arabic–English) (Handbook of Oriental Studies; I.70), Leiden and Boston: Brill, page 147

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

nes

  1. inflection of nést:
    1. second-person singular imperative
    2. past masculine singular transgressive

Anagrams edit

Dutch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch nesse. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /nɛs/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: nes
  • Rhymes: -ɛs

Noun edit

nes f (plural nessen, diminutive nesje n)

  1. headland, spit

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Faroese edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse nes (headland), from Proto-Germanic *nasją. Kindred words are Old English næs (English ness and naze); Swedish näs, German nase; Latin nasus (a nose) as the Icelandic nös (nose).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nes n (genitive singular nes, plural nes)

  1. a headland, a cape, a ness projecting to the sea or lake, a promontory
  2. peninsula

Declension edit

n11s/n22p Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative nes nesið nes nesini
Accusative nes nesið nes nesini
Dative nesi nesinum nes(j)um nes(j)unum
Genitive nes nesins nesja nesjanna

See also edit

References edit

  • Jóhan Hendrik W. Poulsen, et al.: Føroysk orðabók. Tórshavn: Føroya Fróðskaparfelag 1998. (nes)

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse nes (headland), from Proto-Germanic *nasją. Cognate with Old English næs (> English ness and naze); Swedish näs, German Nase. Compare also Latin nasus (nose) and Icelandic nös (nostril).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nes n (genitive singular ness, nominative plural nes)

  1. a headland, a cape, a ness projecting to the sea or lake, a promontory

Declension edit

See also edit

  • oddi (spit of land, point)

References edit

  • Ensk Vasaorðabók, Orðabókaútgáfan 1985

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

nēs

  1. second-person singular present active subjunctive of

Lithuanian edit

Etymology edit

From an older nesà or nėsà, which Ford interprets as ne- + *so; the latter element being from Proto-Indo-European *so (conjunctve particle);[1] compare Hittite 𒋗 (šu-, preterite conjunctive particle), Old Irish se (conjunctive particle), ultimately deriving most likely from the Proto-Indo-European demonstrative *só, *séh₂, *tód. See tas for more. The further parallel drawn by Ford with Hittite 𒈾𒀸𒋗 (naššu, or) is neither supported nor ruled out by Kloekhorst.[2]

Pronunciation edit

IPA(key): /nʲɛs/

  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Conjunction edit

nès

  1. (subordinating) because, since (expresses the reason for an action)
    Àš studijúoju, nès nóriu mókytis. - I study because I want to learn.

Synonyms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Gordon B Ford, Jr. (1965), 'A Note on Lithuanian "nes"', Die Sprache, volume 11 (1–2), pages 136–137.
  2. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin (2008) Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 689

Norwegian Bokmål edit

 
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb
 
A headland in Vega, Norway.

Etymology edit

From Danish næs, from Old Norse nes (headland), from Proto-Germanic *nasją (foothill; headland, cape), from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s (nose).

Cognate with Faroese nes, Icelandic nes, Danish næs and possibly Norman nez.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nes n (definite singular neset, indefinite plural nes, definite plural nesa or nesene)

  1. a headland (coastal land that juts into the sea)
    Synonyms: forberg, odde, tange
    • 1872, Henrik Ibsen, Kongs-Emnerne, page 139:
      den tid der sad en konge på hvert næss
      that time there a king sat on every headland
    • 1888, Henrik Ibsen, Fruen fra havet, page 54:
      [fjorden] med øer og fremspringende næs
      [the fjord] with islands and protruding headlands
    • 1904, Hans E. Kinck, Emigranter, page 7:
      dernede om næsset … dreiede bølgerne sig
      down there around the headland… the waves turned
    • 1996, Ketil Bjørnstad, Historien om Edvard Munch, page 387:
      vi gikk bort til Munchs hus [i Kragerø], som ligger på et nes
      we went to Munch's house [in Kragerø], which is located on a headland
    • 2001, Bente Pedersen, Harpunsønnene:
      det store neset der fjorden var vid og verden nesten alltid virket blå
      the large headland where the fjord was wide and the world almost always seemed blue

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • “nes” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “nes” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).
  • nes” in Store norske leksikon

Anagrams edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse nes (headland), from Proto-Germanic *nasją (foothill; headland, cape), from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s (nose).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /nɛ(ː)s/
  • Hyphenation: nès

Noun edit

nes n (definite singular neset, indefinite plural nes, definite plural nesa)

  1. a headland
    Synonyms: odde (the tip of a headland), tange

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • “nes” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “nes” in Ivar Aasen (1873) Norsk Ordbog med dansk Forklaring

Old French edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nes oblique singularm (oblique plural nes, nominative singular nes, nominative plural nes)

  1. Alternative spelling of nés (nose)

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nes f

  1. Alternative spelling of nés, oblique/nominative plural of nef (ship)

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Contraction edit

nes

  1. Contraction of ne se

Etymology 4 edit

Pronunciation edit

Contraction edit

nes

  1. Contraction of ne les

Etymology 5 edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

nes

  1. Alternative form of nez, inflection of net (clean):
    1. oblique masculine plural
    2. nominative masculine singular

Old Norse edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *nasją.

Noun edit

nes n (genitive ness, plural nes)

  1. headland

Declension edit

Descendants edit

  • Icelandic: nes
  • Faroese: nes
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: nes
  • Swedish: näs
  • Danish: næs
    • Norwegian Bokmål: nes

References edit

  • nes”, in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French Nescafé, a trademark, itself a portmanteau of Nestlé and café.

Noun edit

nes n (plural nesuri)

  1. instant coffee

Declension edit

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

  • nas (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Vallader)

Etymology edit

From Latin nāsus, from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s.

Noun edit

nes m

  1. (anatomy, Puter) nose

Tok Pisin edit

Etymology edit

From English nurse.

Noun edit

nes

  1. nurse

Welsh edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Welsh nes, from Old Welsh nes, from Proto-Brythonic *nes (compare Breton nes (near)), from Proto-Celtic *nessos (compare Old Irish nessa (nearer)).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

nes[2]

  1. comparative degree of agos: nearer
    Synonym: agosach

Conjunction edit

nes

  1. until
    Synonyms: oni, hyd oni
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

nes (not mutable)

  1. first-person singular preterite colloquial of gwneud

References edit

  1. ^ Morris Jones, John (1913) A Welsh Grammar, Historical and Comparative, Oxford: Clarendon Press, § 51 vi
  2. ^ R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “nes”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies