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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

The typographic em is named after the metal type for the capital M in early printing, whose body was square (the printed letter M is almost never one em in width).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ĕm, IPA(key): /ɛm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

NounEdit

em (plural ems)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M/m.
    The ems and ens at the beginnings and ends.
  2. (typography) A unit of measurement equal to the height of the type in use.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

DeterminerEdit

em

  1. Eye dialect spelling of them, representing African American Vernacular English.

Etymology 3Edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Coined by Christine M. Elverson by removing the "th" from them, perhaps influenced by 'em.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

em (third-person singular, gender-neutral, objective case, reflexive emself, possessive adjective eir, possessive pronoun eirs)

  1. (neologism) them (singular). Gender-neutral third-person singular object pronoun, coordinate with him and her.
    • 1986 April 1, Spivak, Michael, The Joy of TeX: A Gourmet Guide to Typesetting with the AMS-TeX macro package[1], Providence: American Mathematical Society, →ISBN, LCCN 85007506, LCC Z253.4.T47 S673 1986, page 68:
      If the author uses such notation, it should be up to Em to indicate Eir intentions clearly, but there's no harm checking first.
    • 1997, Shaviro, Steven, Doom Patrols : A Theoretical Fiction About Postmodernism, London: Serpent's Tail, →ISBN, LCCN 9668813, page 138:
      I may become quite intimate with someone, spend hours with em every night, and yet not have the slightest idea what eir voice sounds like, or what eir RL body looks, feels, and smells like.
    • 2000, Love, Jane, “Ethics, Plugged and Unplugged: The Pegagogy of Disorderly Conduct”, in Inman, James A.; Sewell, Donna N., editors, Taking flight with OWLs: Examining Electronic Writing Center Work[2], Taylor & Francis, →ISBN, LCC PE1414.T24 1999, page 193:
      E invites em to consider how ey represent emselves[sic], and in so doing, e focuses eir attention on the ethics that make human relations possible.
    • 2011 March 15, Edwards, RJ, “89: New Friend”, in Riot Nrrd[3], retrieved 2012-10-06:
      And ultimately: I think my readers are mature enough that knowing eir assigned gender is not going to give them an “excuse” to misgender em.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 4Edit

PronunciationEdit

Compare um.

InterjectionEdit

em

  1. (Scotland, Ireland) a form of hesitant speech, or an expression of uncertainty; um; umm; erm
    She was going to, em... the salon, I think.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin , from Proto-Indo-European *(e)me-.

PronounEdit

em (proclitic, contracted m', enclitic me, contracted enclitic 'm)

  1. me (direct or indirect object)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

em n

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter M/m.

Further readingEdit


KurdishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

em

  1. we; us (first-person plural personal pronoun)

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

em (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter M.

Usage notesEdit

  • Multiple Latin names for the letter M, m have been suggested. The most common is em or a syllabic m, although there is some evidence which also supports, as names for the letter, , əm, , and even (in the fourth- or fifth-century first Antinoë papyrus, which gives Greek transliterations of the Latin names of the Roman alphabet’s letters) ιμμε (imme).

Coordinate termsEdit

InterjectionEdit

em

  1. of wonder or emphasis, there!

ReferencesEdit

  • em in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • em in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • em in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[4], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to sully one's fair fame: vitae splendori(em) maculas(is) aspergere
  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), especially pages 30–31, 42–44, and 63

LatvianEdit

PronunciationEdit

(file)

NounEdit

em m (invariable)

  1. The Latvian name of the Latin script letter M/m.

See alsoEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

em

  1. Reduced form of him

DeclensionEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

em

  1. Alternative form of hem

ReferencesEdit


Old FrisianEdit

NounEdit

ēm m

  1. an uncle, mother's brother

DeclensionEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *immi ("am"; a form of the verb *wesaną (to be; dwell)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ésmi (I am, I exist). Cognate with English am, Gothic 𐌹𐌼 (im, am), Latin sum (am), Ancient Greek εἰμί (eimí), Albanian jam (I am), Sanskrit अस्मि (ásmi), Latvian esmu ((I) am), esam (we are).

VerbEdit

em

  1. I am, the first person of vera (meaning "to be")

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese en, from Latin in (in), from Proto-Italic *en, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁én (in). Doublet of in.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

em

  1. in; inside; within (contained by)
    Estou na minha casa.
    I’m in my house.
    Encontraram umas moedas no baú.
    They found some coins inside the chest.
  2. on; on top of (located just above the surface of)
    • 2003, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix, Rocco, page 417:
      Então o sorriso reapareceu em seu rosto [...]
      Then the smile reappeared on his face [...]
    O livro está na mesa.
    The book is on the table.
  3. in; at (located in a location)
    Os soldados estão na Crimeia.
    The soldiers are in Crimea.
  4. in (part of; a member of)
    Só três jogadores ainda estão nesse time.
    Only three players are still in this team.
  5. in; into; inside (towards the inside of)
    A água entrou em várias casas.
    The water got into various houses.
  6. indicates the target of an action
    Quero dar um soco na tua cara.
    I want to punch you in the face.
    Mete um processo neles.
    Shove a lawsuit down their throats.
  7. in (pertaining to the particular thing)
    Ela não passou em inglês.
    She didn’t pass in English.
  8. in (immediately after a period of time)
    Entraremos em contato com você em duas semanas.
    We will get in contact with you in two weeks.
  9. in; during (within a period of time)
    O jornal será publicado no dia cinco.
    The newspaper will be published on the fifth.
  10. at; in (in a state of)
    Estamos em perigo!
    We’re in danger!
  11. in (indicates means, medium, format, genre or instrumentality)
    Fomos pagos em moeda estrangeira.
    We were paid in foreign currency.
  12. in (indicates a language, script, tone etc. of writing, speaking etc.)
    Li um livro em holandês.
    I read a book in Dutch.
  13. in (wearing)
    A moça em preto.
    The lady in black.
  14. (slang) indicates that the object deserves a given punishment
    Cadeia nele!
    He should be in jail! (literally: jail on him!)

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:em.

SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

When followed by an article, a pronoun, a demonstrative pronoun or adjective, em is combined with the next word to give the following combined forms:


ScotsEdit

VerbEdit

em

  1. (South Scots) emphatic first-person singular simple present of ti be

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • em.
  • e.m.
  • e. m.

AbbreviationEdit

em

  1. pm (indicating hours in the afternoon); Abbreviation of eftermiddagen.

Usage notesEdit

  • Since the 1960s, Sweden primarily uses the 24 hour clock, making am/pm abbreviations unnecessary and less common

AntonymsEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English him.

PronounEdit

em

  1. The third person singular pronoun refers to a person or thing other than the speaker or the person being spoken to. Pronouns in Tok Pisin are not inflected for different cases.
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 1:15:

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. This language is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

See alsoEdit


Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English him.

PronounEdit

em

  1. he/she/it (third-person singular pronoun)

VepsEdit

VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *ʔɛːm, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *(sʔ)iəm; cognate with Pacoh a-em (younger sibling).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

em (, , )

  1. younger sibling

Derived termsEdit

PronounEdit

em (, , )

  1. (familiar) I; me (when you speak to a person who is (presumably) not much older than you, your teacher, or if you're the female partner in a heterosexual relationship or marriage)
  2. (familiar) you (when you speak to a person who is (presumably) not much younger than you, or your student, or if you're the male partner in a heterosexual relationship or marriage)

SynonymsEdit

  • (in teacher-student relationship): con

AdjectiveEdit

em (, , )

  1. small; smaller

See alsoEdit