See also: Peg, PEG, and peg-

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English pegge, from Middle Dutch pegge (pin, peg), from Old Dutch *pigg-, *pegg-, from Proto-Germanic *pig-, *pag- (peg, stake), from Proto-Indo-European *bak-, *baḱ- (club, pointed stick, peg). Cognate with Dutch dialectal peg (pin), Low German pig, pigge (peg, stick with a point), Low German pegel (post, stake), Swedish pigg (tooth, spike), Danish pig (spike), Norwegian Bokmål pigg (spike), Irish bac (stick, crook), Latin baculum (staff), Latvian bakstît (to poke), Ancient Greek βάκτρον (báktron, staff, walking stick). Related to beak.

This is one of the very few English words that begin with a p and come from Proto-Germanic. Proto-Germanic *p, when not in a consonant cluster beginning with *s, developed by Grimm's law from the Proto-Indo-European consonant *b, which was very rare.

(To indicate or ascribe an attribute to):: Assumed to originate from the use of pegs or pins as markers on a bulletin board or a list.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /pɛɡ/, [pʰɛɡ]
  • (file)
  • Homophone: Peg
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡ

Noun edit

peg (plural pegs)

  1. A cylindrical wooden or metal object used to fasten or as a bearing between objects.
  2. A protrusion used to hang things on.
    Hang your coat on the peg and come in.
  3. (figurative) A support; a reason; a pretext.
    a peg to hang a claim upon
  4. (cribbage) A peg moved on a crib board to keep score.
  5. (finance) A fixed exchange rate, where a currency's value is matched to the value of another currency or measure such as gold.
    • 2022, Simon Dingle, Steven Boykey Sidley, chapter 7, in Beyond Bitcoin[1], Icon Books, →ISBN:
      The following became obvious quite quickly – the cryptosphere needed a nonvolatile peg.
  6. (UK) A small quantity of a strong alcoholic beverage.
    Synonym: shot
    • 1898, unknown author, Harper's Magazine:
      This over, the club will be visited for a "peg," Anglice drink.
    • 1953, S. S. Field, The American drink book, page 65:
      The name had come to mean any aromatic essence of herbs by the time the first thirsty colonial poured a peg of Who-shot-John into his mint water.
  7. A place formally allotted for fishing
  8. (colloquial, dated) A leg or foot.
  9. One of the pins of a musical instrument, on which the strings are strained.
  10. A step; a degree.
  11. Ellipsis of clothes peg.
  12. (journalism) A topic of interest, such as an ongoing event or an anniversary, around which various features can be developed.
    • 2004, Herbert J. Gans, Deciding What's News:
      [] all news media keep a supply of features on hand, waiting for a peg to make them topical.
    • 2010, Barbie Zelizer, Stuart Allan, Keywords in News and Journalism Studies, page 111:
      Journalists and prospective sources wishing to attract their attention are constantly on the lookout for pegs. The process by which a peg is identified is informed by news values.
  13. (cricket, slang) A stump.
    • 1961, Colin McCool, Cricket is a Game, page 123:
      Lindy hit the pegs with five deliveries out of six.
  14. (slang) The penetration of one's (male) partner in the anus using a strap-on dildo.
    Get your strap-on out and give me a nice peg!
  15. (slang, archaic) A serving of brandy and soda.
    • 1894, Arthur Travers Crawford, Reminiscences of an Indian Police Official, page 183:
      I then ordered a "peg" (brandy-and-soda) to be brought to my tent, and returned to have a smoke before turning in again.
  16. (India) A serving of any hard spirit, particularly whisky.
    • 2008 September 2, Daniel Lak, India Express: The Future of the New Superpower, St. Martin's Press, →ISBN:
      This is the sort of drinking that Anna Hazare fought to eradicate from Ralegan Siddhi, as Colonel Phatak explained, after I joked about an army man needing his evening peg of whisky before dinner.
  17. (UK, slang, obsolete) A shilling.
    • 1859, Snowden's magistrates assistant, page 90:
      The price of a case (five shillings piece bad) from the smasher is about one shilling; an alderman (two and sixpence) about sixpence; a peg (shilling) about threepence; a downer or sprat (sixpence) about twopence.
  18. (psychology) An easily recalled image that a person mentally visualizes with something else, in order to remember that other thing. See mnemonic peg system.
    • 2013, Rod Plotnik, Haig Kouyoumdjian, Introduction to Psychology:
      To remember this list of early psychologists, you recall each peg along with its image of an early psychologist that you placed there.
    • 2023, W. Scott Terry, Learning and Memory: Basic Principles, Processes, and Procedures, page 168:
      Multiple items can be stored at each location or with each peg.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

peg (third-person singular simple present pegs, present participle pegging, simple past and past participle pegged)

  1. (transitive) To fasten using a peg.
    Let's peg the rug to the floor.
  2. (transitive) To affix or pin.
    I found a tack and pegged your picture to the bulletin board.
    She lunged forward and pegged him to the wall.
  3. (transitive) To fix a value or price.
    China's currency is no longer pegged to the American dollar.
    • 2023 March 8, Howard Johnston, “Was Marples the real railway wrecker?”, in RAIL, number 978, page 51:
      Wages absorbed 80% of the total revenue (which was inescapable), and they were rising at almost twice the rate of fares, which were pegged by law.
  4. (transitive) To narrow the cuff openings of a pair of pants so that the legs take on a peg shape.
  5. (transitive, slang) To throw.
  6. (transitive, kickball) To throw a ball at (someone), to hit (someone) with a ball.
  7. (transitive, slang) To indicate or ascribe an attribute to.
    He's been pegged as a suspect.
    I pegged his weight at 165.
  8. (cribbage) To move one's pegs to indicate points scored; to score with a peg.
    She pegged twelve points.
  9. (transitive, slang) To reach or exceed the maximum value on (a scale or gauge).
    We pegged the speedometer across the flats.
  10. (slang, transitive, typically in heterosexual contexts) To engage in anal sex by penetrating (one's male partner) with a strap-on dildo.
    • 2007, Violet Blue, The Adventurous Couple's Guide to Strap-On Sex[2], →ISBN, page 32:
      When you're pegging him and he gets close to orgasm, you'll observe a number of physical signs []
  11. (intransitive) To keep working hard at something; to peg away.
    • 1911, William Montgomerie Lamont, Volunteer memories, page 160:
      For more than the period of his splendid service in India, which the country was not slow to acknowledge, the Volunteers had kept pegging at it, despite all the official obstacles thrown in the way []
  12. (slang, archaic) To drink alcohol frequently, especially brandy and soda; to tipple.
  13. (UK, slang, obsolete, transitive) To drive (a hackney carriage).
    • 2014, Robert Newman, The Case of the Somerville Secret:
      I was pegging a hack when the horse started limping. I got down to see if he'd picked up a stone and he lashed out at me.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

peg

  1. imperative of pege

Middle English edit

Noun edit

peg

  1. peg

Slovene edit

Noun edit

peg

  1. genitive dual/plural of pega

Swedish edit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv
 
golfboll på peg

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English peg.

Noun edit

peg c

  1. (golf) a tee (peg on which the golf ball is placed)

Declension edit

Declension of peg 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative peg peggen peggar peggarna
Genitive pegs peggens peggars peggarnas

See also edit

References edit

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

Possibly from English peg.

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: peg
  • IPA(key): /ˈpeɡ/, [ˈpɛɡ]

Noun edit

peg (Baybayin spelling ᜉᜒᜄ᜔)

  1. (slang) desired way or style of doing things (Is there an English equivalent to this definition?)
    Synonyms: gusto, (slang) trip
    Ano ba'ng peg mo ha?
    What are you trying to do?
    Ang ganda mo! Miss Universe lang ang peg?
    You're so beautiful! You're trying to be like a Miss Universe?
    (literally, “The style is so Miss Universe?”)