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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English universal, from Old French universal (French universel), from Latin universalis.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˌjuːnɪˈvɜːsl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˌjuːnɪˈvɜːɹsl/
  • (file)
    Rhymes: -ɜː(r)səl

AdjectiveEdit

universal (comparative more universal, superlative most universal)

  1. Of or pertaining to the universe.
  2. Common to all members of a group or class.
    • 1922, Henry Ford, My Life and Work:
      I had been planning every day through these years toward a universal car.
    • 1911, 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica:
      In Logic, the letter A is used as a symbol for the universal affirmative proposition in the general form "all x is y."
  3. Common to all society; worldwide
    She achieved universal fame.
    • a. 1701, John Dryden, “The Life of John Dryden, Esq.”, in The Miscellaneous Works of John Dryden, [], volume I, London: Printed for J[acob] and R[ichard] Tonson, [], published 1760, OCLC 863244003, page xiii:
      [John] Dryden's univerſal genius, his firmly eſtablished reputation, and the glory his memory muſt always reflect upon the nation that gave him birth, make us ardently wiſh for a more accurate life of him than any which has hitherto appeared: []
  4. unlimited; vast; infinite
  5. Useful for many purposes; all-purpose.
    universal wrench

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

NounEdit

universal (plural universals)

  1. (philosophy) A characteristic or property that particular things have in common.
    • 1912, Bertrand Russel, The Problems of Philosophy, Chapter 9:
      When we examine common words, we find that, broadly speaking, proper names stand for particulars, while other substantives, adjectives, prepositions, and verbs stand for universals.
    • 1970, John R. Searle, Speech acts[1]:
      We might also distinguish those expressions which are used to refer to individuals or particulars from those which are used to refer to what philosophers have called universals: e.g., to distinguish such expressions as "Everest" and "this chair" from "the number three", "the color red" and "drunkenness".

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

universal (masculine and feminine plural universals)

  1. universal

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

AdjectiveEdit

universal m or f (plural universais)

  1. of or pertaining to the universe
  2. world-wide, universal, common to all cultures

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

universal (comparative universaler, superlative am universalsten)

  1. universal

DeclensionEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French universel, from Latin ūniversālis; equivalent to universe +‎ -al.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /iu̯niˈvɛrsal/, /iu̯nivɛrˈsaːl/, /iu̯niˈvɛrsɛl/

AdjectiveEdit

universal

  1. all-encompassing, subject to everything and everyone; having universal significance.
  2. (Late Middle English) absolute, subject to everything in a given area or subject (e.g. a settlement; a person)
  3. (Late Middle English) frequently practiced, usual, customary.
  4. (Late Middle English, rare) Given total leeway and control; with universal power.
  5. (Late Middle English, rare) unbiased, unprejudiced, nonpolitical
  6. (Late Middle English, rare) general, non-specific, generic
  7. (Late Middle English, philosophy, rare) unformed, uncreated, unmade.
  8. (Late Middle English, philosophy, rare) theoretical, abstract, general.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: universal

ReferencesEdit

NounEdit

universal

  1. (Late Middle English, philosophy, rare) A category, class, or classification.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

DeterminerEdit

universal

  1. (Late Middle English) The whole, all of, every portion of, all parts of.
  2. (Late Middle English, rare) Every kind of; all sorts of

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

universal m (oblique and nominative feminine singular universale)

  1. universal

DescendantsEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

universal

  1. universal

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin universalis.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /u.ni.vɨɾ.ˈsaɫ/
  • Hyphenation: u‧ni‧ver‧sal

AdjectiveEdit

universal m or f (plural universais, comparable)

  1. Of or pertaining to the universe; universal.
  2. Common to all society; universal; world-wide.
  3. Common to all members of a group or class; universal.

InflectionEdit

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:universal.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • universal in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /uniberˈsal/, [uniβerˈsal]
  • Hyphenation: u‧ni‧ver‧sal

AdjectiveEdit

universal (plural universales)

  1. universal

Related termsEdit