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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English vapour, from Anglo-Norman vapour, Old French vapor, from Latin vapor (steam, heat).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈveɪpə/
  • Rhymes: -eɪpə(r)
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NounEdit

 
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vapor (plural vapors) (American spelling)

  1. Cloudy diffused matter such as mist, steam or fumes suspended in the air.
  2. The gaseous state of a substance that is normally a solid or liquid.
    • 2013 July-August, Philip J. Bushnell, “Solvents, Ethanol, Car Crashes & Tolerance”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name):
      Surprisingly, this analysis revealed that acute exposure to solvent vapors at concentrations below those associated with long-term effects appears to increase the risk of a fatal automobile accident. Furthermore, this increase in risk is comparable to the risk of death from leukemia after long-term exposure to benzene, another solvent, which has the well-known property of causing this type of cancer.
  3. Something insubstantial.
    • 1781, Horace Walpole, :
      I am at this present very sick of my little vapour of fame.
    • 1822, Charles Perkins, An Oration, page 19:
      The press operates as a safety-valve for the vapor of popular ebullision.
    • 1875, Albert Barnes, Notes, Explanatory and Practical, on the General Epistles of James, Peter, John, and Jude, page 80:
      The previous question had turned the attention to life as something peculiarly frail, and as of such a nature that no calculation could be based on its permanence. This expression gives a reason for that, to wit, that it is a mere vapor.
    • 1999, Martin Heidegger, An Introduction to Metaphysics, page 50:
      Here we can explain only in these broad outlines why the asking of the question of being is in itself through and through historical, and why, accordingly, our question as to whether being will remain a mere vapor for us or become the destiny of the West is anything but an exaggeration and a rhetorical figure.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

vapor (third-person singular simple present vapors, present participle vaporing, simple past and past participle vapored) (American spelling)

  1. (intransitive) To become vapor; to be emitted or circulated as vapor.
  2. (transitive) To turn into vapor.
  3. (intransitive) To use insubstantial language; to boast or bluster.
    • 1888, Rudyard Kipling, ‘The Bisara of Pooree’, Plain Tales from the Hills, Folio Society 2005, p. 172:
      He vapoured, and fretted, and fumed, and trotted up and down, and tried to make himself pleasing in Miss Hollis's big, quiet, grey eyes, and failed.
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 1, [1]
      [] an amusing character all but extinct now, but occasionally to be encountered [] vaporing in the groggeries along the tow-path.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

NounEdit

vapor ?

  1. steamboat

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vapor.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

vapor m (plural vapores)

  1. vapor

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vapor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vapor m (plural vapors)

  1. vapor, steam

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vapor.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

vapor m (plural vapores)

  1. vapor

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


LadinoEdit

NounEdit

vapor m (Latin spelling)

  1. ship, steamer

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Uncertain, but possibly related to Ancient Greek καπνός (kapnós, smoke) and Proto-Indo-European *kʷep- (to smoke, boil, move violently), via an older form *quapor that eventually lost its velar.[1] See also hope.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vapor m (genitive vapōris); third declension

  1. steam, exhalation, vapour; smoke
  2. warm exhalation, warmth, heat
  3. ardour of love, warmth

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative vapor vapōrēs
Genitive vapōris vapōrum
Dative vapōrī vapōribus
Accusative vapōrem vapōrēs
Ablative vapōre vapōribus
Vocative vapor vapōrēs

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Asturian: vapor
  • Catalan: vapor
  • English: vapor
  • French: vapeur
  • Galician: vapor

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Colarusso, Further Etymologies Between Indo-European and Northwest Caucasian

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

vapor

  1. Alternative form of vapour

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

vapor f (oblique plural vapors, nominative singular vapor, nominative plural vapors)

  1. Alternative form of vapeur

PiedmonteseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vapor m (plural vapor)

  1. vapor, steam

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vapor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vapor m (plural vapores)

  1. vapor / vapour

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • vapor in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian vapore, French vapeur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vapor n (plural vapoare)

  1. boat, ship

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin vapor.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /baˈpoɾ/
  • Rhymes: -oɾ
  • Hyphenation: va‧por

NounEdit

vapor m (plural vapores)

  1. steam, vapor (water vapor)

Derived termsEdit

  • olla de vapor (steamer) (regional parts of Spain and Mexico)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit