See also: Aitch.

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ache, borrowed from Old French ache, from Vulgar Latin *acca, probably an extension of earlier ha, from an unindentified source. Compare Italian acca.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

aitch (plural aitches)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H.
    • 1773, The Monthly Review Or Literary Journal Enlarged, October
      The word length, which contains only four sounds l e ng th, is usually spell'd thus, el ee en gee tee aitch.
    • 1898, H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, London: William Heinemann, page 257:
      "If you've got any drawing-room manners, or a dislike to eating peas with a knife or dropping aitches, you'd better chuck 'em away. They ain't no further use."
    • 1959, Anthony Burgess, Beds in the East (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 469:
      She frowned, hearing Lim Cheng Po's voice, so English, so refined, so very English upper-class. And often she had had to tell Joe about his aitches.
    The word hour is written with a silent aitch.
    Cockneys drop their aitches.

Usage notesEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: haitch
  • Arabic: إِتْش‎(ʾitš)
  • Greek: έιτς (éits)
  • → Japanese: エイチ (eichi), dated エッチ (etchi)
  • Korean: 에이치 (eichi)
  • Persian: ایچ(English letter H)
  • Russian: эйч (ejč, English letter H)
  • → Thai: เอช (éech), เฮช (héech)

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Orthographically from English aitch, but phonetically a regular reflex of Middle English ache, from Old French ache, from Vulgar Latin *acca, probably an extension of earlier ha, from an unindentified source.

Alternative formsEdit

NumeralEdit

aitch (plural aitches)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H.
ReferencesEdit