Letter y.svg
y U+0079, y
LATIN SMALL LETTER Y
x
[U+0078]
Basic Latin z
[U+007A]
U+FF59, y
FULLWIDTH LATIN SMALL LETTER Y

[U+FF58]
Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms
[U+FF5A]

TranslingualEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

LetterEdit

y (upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.

See alsoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

SymbolEdit

y

  1. (metrology) Symbol for the prefix yocto-.
  2. (IPA) close front rounded vowel
  3. Denoting an item that is twenty-fifth in a list.

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

Other representations of Y:


EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y, plural ys or y's)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the English alphabet, called wy or wye and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

y

  1. Abbreviation of year.
    • 2003, Howard Tanner, Sonia Jones, Becoming a Successful Teacher of Mathematics
      Consider the following questions selected from the tests and estimate the proportion of Y8 pupils you would expect to answer correctly.
  2. (Britain, television) Abbreviation of youth., usually followed by an age appropriate for the content so marked.
    Y7
  3. (computing) Abbreviation of yes.

Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

y (not comparable)

  1. (slang, text messaging, Internet slang) Abbreviation of why.

See alsoEdit


AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin et, from Proto-Indo-European *éti.

ConjunctionEdit

y

  1. and

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin et, from Proto-Indo-European *éti.

ConjunctionEdit

y

  1. and

PronounEdit

y (y (or -y), plural ys/yos or -ys/-yos)

  1. Pronoun for the third-person singular indirect object.
    da-y pan
    give him/her bread

Usage notesEdit

  • Usually seen as -y

AzerbaijaniEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y lower case (upper case Y)

  1. The thirty-first letter of the Azerbaijani alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


BasqueEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /i ɡreko/, [i ɣ̞re̞.ko̞]

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-sixth letter of the Basque alphabet, called i greko and written in the Latin script.

Usage notesEdit

  • Used chiefly in recent loanwords and foreign proper nouns.

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

ConjunctionEdit

y

  1. Obsolete form of i (and).

CornishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

y

  1. (Standard Cornish) they (third person plural pronoun)
  2. (Standard Cornish, Standard Written Form) his

DutchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • ij (in some words)

PronunciationEdit

  • (letter name): IPA(key): /ɛɪ/, /iˈɡrɛk/, /ˌɣrik.sə ˈɛɪ/
  • (file)

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Dutch alphabet.

Usage notesEdit

In certain dialects the letter is pronounced similar to IPA: /ji:/. In these dialects, they will actually write "y" such as in "jy" (IPA: /ji:/) instead of modern standard Dutch jij (IPA: /jɛɪ/).

See alsoEdit

  • Previous letter: x
  • Next letter: z

FalaEdit

ConjunctionEdit

y

  1. Alternative form of i

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-sixth letter of the Faroese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-fourth letter of the Finnish alphabet, called yy and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From i grec (Greek i), referring to the letter upsilon (Υ), originally borrowed from the Greek alphabet, as opposed to "Latin i" (I).

PronunciationEdit

  • (letter name) IPA(key): /i.ɡʁɛk/

LetterEdit

y

  1. a letter in the French alphabet, after x and before z

Etymology 2Edit

10th century; from Old French i, from Latin hīc (here) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰi-ḱe (this, here)), with meaning influenced by Old French iv (there, thither), itself from Latin ibī. Derivation from the latter poses difficulty from a phonetic standpoint. Compare Catalan hi.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

y (adverbial)

  1. there (at a place)
    Il est dans la maison. Il y est.
    He is in the house. He is there.
  2. there, thither (to there)
    Nous allons au Mexique. Nous y allons.
    We are going to Mexico. We are going there.
  3. Used as a pronoun to replace à followed by an indirect object.
    1. With verbs: see Appendix:French verbs followed by à for verbs which use this structure.
    2. (archaic) With adjectives. Only used with handful of adjectives (the most usual being y compris, which is a special case), mainly in legal language.
      personnes y nomméesPersons named there
      procédures y afférentesRelated procedures
      documents y relatifsRelated documents
      eaux y affluentesTributary waters

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Eye dialect spelling of il. or Contraction of il. .

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

y ?

  1. (Quebec, France, colloquial) He: alternative form of il
  2. (Quebec, France, colloquial) They: alternative form of ils
  3. (Quebec, colloquial) They: alternative form of elles

Further readingEdit


FulaEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. A letter of the Fula alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Usage notesEdit

See alsoEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (phoneme) IPA(key): /yː/, /y/, /ʏ/, /i/, /ɪ/, /j/
  • (letter name) IPA(key): /ˈʏpsilɔn/

LetterEdit

y n (genitive y, plural y)

  1. the letter y

GuaraníEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

y

  1. water

Derived termsEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

Contraction of yo.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

y

  1. Contraction of yo.

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (phoneme): IPA(key): [ˈi]
  • (letter name): IPA(key): [ˈipsilon]

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. A letter of the extended Hungarian alphabet, called ipszilon and written in the Latin script.

Usage notesEdit

As shown in the alphabet below, this letter normally occurs in Hungarian words only as part of four digraphs: gylyny, and ty (with their long counterparts: ggy, lly, nny, tty). Aside from them, the terms containing y defined in an extensive Hungarian monolingual dictionary[1] are baby-doll, baby-sitter, body (bodice), body-building / bodyzik / bodyzó, boy, brandy, citoyen, country​/​countryzene, cowboy​/​cowboyfilm​/​cowboykalap, curry, disc-jockey, doyen, dry, dyn, fair play, háryjános​/​háryjánoskodik, intercity, joystick, play back, playboy, royalista, sherry, spray, whisky, yard, yperit, yuppie, złoty and the letter itself. Additionally, a newer and more comprehensive but as yet incomplete dictionary[2] contains bicsérdysta, byte, copyright, and cowboycsizma. (The forms dandy, gentry, happy end (happy ending), jersey, maya, nylon, and yen are also mentioned as alternative forms in the former volume, but their current standard spelling is dendi, dzsentri, dzsörzé, hepiend, jen, maja, and nejlon.)

Proper names written with y include the country names Guyana, Paraguay, Seychelle-szigetek, and Uruguay and the capital names Conakry, Port Moresby, and Reykjavík. Other names deriving from Latin alphabets are also retained (such as English Calgary, Hollywood, Kentucky, Montgomery, New Jersey, New York, Sydney, Wyoming etc., German Bayreuth, Speyer, Steyr, French Lyon, Mayotte, Nancy, Vichy, and Polish Białystok, Bydgoszcz, Przemyśl). Otherwise, this letter is usually transcribed in country and city names, for example Jemen (Yemen), Malajzia (Malaysia), Nepjida (Naypyidaw), and Rijád (Riyadh).

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative y y-ok
accusative y-t y-okat
dative y-nak y-oknak
instrumental y-nal y-okkal
causal-final y-ért y-okért
translative y-ná y-okká
terminative y-ig y-okig
essive-formal y-ként y-okként
essive-modal
inessive y-ban y-okban
superessive y-on y-okon
adessive y-nál y-oknál
illative y-ba y-okba
sublative y-ra y-okra
allative y-hoz y-okhoz
elative y-ból y-okból
delative y-ról y-okról
ablative y-tól y-októl
non-attributive
possessive - singular
y-é y-oké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
y-éi y-okéi
Possessive forms of y
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. y-om y-aim
y-jaim
2nd person sing. y-od y-aid
y-jaid
3rd person sing. y-a
y-ja
y-ai
y-jai
1st person plural y-unk y-aink
y-jaink
2nd person plural y-otok y-aitok
y-jaitok
3rd person plural y-uk
y-juk
y-aik
y-jaik

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 75,000 entries in Pusztai, Ferenc (ed.). Magyar értelmező kéziszótár (’A Concise Explanatory Dictionary of Hungarian’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2003. →ISBN
  2. ^ As of 2021, completed until ELZ. Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (’A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress)

Further readingEdit

  • y in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (context pronunciation) IPA(key): /j/
  • (letter name) IPA(key): /je/

LetterEdit

y (upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Ido alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

y m or f (invariable)

  1. see under Y

KabuverdianuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish y and Portuguese e .

ConjunctionEdit

y

  1. and

ReferencesEdit

  • Gonçalves, Manuel (2015) Capeverdean Creole-English dictionary, →ISBN

KamayuráEdit

NounEdit

y

  1. Alternative form of

ReferencesEdit

  • Languages of the Amazon (2012, →ISBN

Khumi ChinEdit

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

y

  1. no

ReferencesEdit

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[1], Payap University, page 47

LadinEdit

ConjunctionEdit

y

  1. and

LatgalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (upper case Y)

  1. The fourteenth letter of the Latgalian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ȳ f (indeclinable)

  1. A name of the letter Y.

SynonymsEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (upper case Y)

  1. The fifteenth letter of the Lithuanian alphabet, called i ilgoji and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


MalayEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Malay alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


MandinkaEdit

PronounEdit

y

  1. they, them (personal pronoun)

See alsoEdit


ManxEdit

ArticleEdit

y

  1. Alternative form of yn

Mbyá GuaraníEdit

NounEdit

y

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English .

PronounEdit

y

  1. Alternative form of I

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English in.

PrepositionEdit

y

  1. Alternative form of in (in)

Middle FrenchEdit

AdverbEdit

y

  1. there (in a given place)
    • 1488, Jean Dupré, Lancelot du Lac, page 12:
      Or me dictes fist Lancelot, des lettres qui illec sont escriptes, savez vous qui les y fist mettre
      Now tell me, said Lancelot, about these letters that are written here, do you know who put them here?

NorwegianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Norwegian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Usage notesEdit

  • Perhaps the most troublesome sound in Norwegian. Even some native speakers tend to merge it into /i(ː)/.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse úa.

VerbEdit

y (present tense yr, past tense ydde, past participle ydd/ytt, passive infinitive yast, present participle yande, imperative y)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

ReferencesEdit


Old TupiEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

y

  1. water
  2. river

ReferencesEdit


PapiamentuEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • i (alternative spelling)

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish y and Portuguese e and Kabuverdianu i.

ConjunctionEdit

y

  1. and

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): //ɨ// invalid IPA characters (//)

LetterEdit

y (upper case Y, lower case)

  1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Polish alphabet, called y or igrek and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Portuguese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


QuechuaEdit

AdverbEdit

y

  1. really, truly

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The thirtieth letter of the Romanian alphabet, called igrec or i grec and written in the Latin script.

Usage notesEdit

Used chiefly in recent loanwords and foreign proper nouns.

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

 
  • (letter name) IPA(key): (everywhere but Argentina and Uruguay) /ˈʝe/, [ˈɟ͡ʝe]
  • IPA(key): (Buenos Aires and environs) /ˈʃe/, [ˈʃe]
  • IPA(key): (elsewhere in Argentina and Uruguay) /ˈʒe/, [ˈʒe]

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-sixth letter of the Spanish alphabet, called ye or i griega and written in the Latin script.
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Spanish è or e, from Latin et.

Alternative formsEdit

  • e
  • i (obsolete)

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

y

  1. and
    • 1605, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote de la Mancha1, Chapter I:
      Es, pues, de saber que este sobredicho hidalgo, los ratos que estaba ocioso —que eran los más del año—, se daba a leer libros de caballerías, con tanta afición y gusto, que olvidó casi de todo punto el ejercicio de la caza y aun la administración de su hacienda; y llegó a tanto su curiosidad y desatino en esto, que vendió muchas hanegas de tierra de sembradura para comprar libros de caballerías en que leer, y, así, llevó a su casa todos cuantos pudo haber dellos.
      You must know, then, that the above-named gentleman whenever he was at leisure (which was mostly all the year round) gave himself up to reading books of chivalry with such ardour and avidity that he almost entirely neglected the pursuit of his field-sports, and even the management of his property; and to such a pitch did his eagerness and infatuation go that he sold many an acre of tillageland to buy books of chivalry to read, and brought home as many of them as he could get.
  2. (in names of number) and
    setenta y seisseventy-six
  3. (in arithmetic) plus, and
    uno y uno son dosone plus one is two
  4. (informal) well
    ¡Y por supuesto!Well, of course!
  5. (informal) what about, how about, where is/are the
    Pero, ¿y el concierto? ¿Ya no vamos?But what about the concert? Are we not going anymore?
    ¿Y la niña? ¿Está a salvo?How about the girl? Is she safe?
    ¿Y los archivos? Debo echarles un vistazo.Where are the files? I should take a look at them.
Usage notesEdit
  • Before words that begin with the /i/ sound, the form e is used instead.

Further readingEdit


TurkishEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Turkish alphabet, called ye and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


TurkmenEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (phoneme) IPA(key): /ɯ/, /ɯː/

LetterEdit

y (upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Turkmen alphabet, called y and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

NounEdit

y

  1. (archaic, literary) he; him; she; her
    • 1958, Nguyễn Đổng Chi, "Thạch Sùng còn thiếu mẻ kho hay là Sự tích con mối" (Kho tàng truyện cố tích Việt Nam nr. 36), NXB Văn sử địa
      Hồi đó ở kinh đô có một người em hoàng hậu họ Vương. Y cũng là tay cự phú nổi tiếng tiền rừng biển bạc và xài phí vào bậc nhất.
      At the time, there was in the capital a brother of the queen of the Wáng family. He was also a famous for being immensely rich and was an extravagant spender of first degree.
  2. (formal, derogatory) he/him, that jerk/prick/thug/criminal

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Sino-Vietnamese word from .

AdverbEdit

y

  1. (informal) exactly; precisely (like)
    y nhưexactly like/as
    y như thậtso realistic (literally, “exactly like real life”)
    y changvery much like
Derived termsEdit
Derived terms

WayampiEdit

NounEdit

y

  1. Alternative form of ɨɨ (water)
    ay'ú.I drink water.

ReferencesEdit

  • Handbook of Amazonian Languages, volume 4 (1998), edited by Desmond C. Derbyshire, Geoffrey K. Pullum

WelshEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (with grave accent to indicate otherwise unpredictable short vowel /ə/):
  • (with acute accent to indicate unusually stressed short vowel): ý
  • (with circumflex to indicate otherwise unpredictable or unusually stressed long vowel): ŷ
  • (with diaeresis to indicate disyllabicity): ÿ

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y f (plural yau)

  1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Welsh alphabet, called y and written in the Latin script. It is preceded by w.
  2. The name of the Latin-script letter Y.
MutationEdit
Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
y unchanged unchanged hy
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
Derived termsEdit
  • Digraph sequences: yw

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Welsh y, yr, from Old Welsh ir, ultimately from Proto-Celtic *sindos.

PronunciationEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • 'r (used after vowels)
  • yr (used before vowels and h)

ArticleEdit

y (definite) (triggers soft mutation of a feminine singular noun, except ll and rh remain unmutated)

  1. the
    y bachgen mthe boy
    y ferch fthe girl
    y llong fthe ship
    y bechgyn plthe boys
    y merched plthe girls

Etymology 3Edit

Merger of two formerly distinct particles, ydd and yd.

Alternative formsEdit

  • yr (used before vowels and h)

PronunciationEdit

ParticleEdit

y

  1. (literary) that (preverbal particle used to mark a subordinate clause)
    Wyt ti'n meddwl y gall hi ddod?
    Do you think that she can come?
    Mae hi'n gwybod y byddet ti'n gwrando arni hi.
    She knows that you would listen to her.
  2. (literary) which, whom (particle used with indirect relative clauses)
    y dyn y dysgais ei fabthe man whose son I taught
    y ferch y gwrandewais arnithe girl to whom I listened
  3. (literary) preverbal particle used to mark an affirmative verb in a main clause
    • 1620, William Morgan, Y Bibl Cyssegr-lan, Genesis 1:1
      Yn y dechreuad y creodd Duw y nefoedd a’r ddaear.
      In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
Usage notesEdit
  • y is almost always omitted in colloquial speech.
  • y is used to mean 'that' (i.e. mark a subordinate clause) when the subordinate clause begins with an affirmative form of bod not in the present tense, or another affirmative verb in any tense apart from the preterite.
Related termsEdit
  • a
  • bod
  • mai (with fronted element, marked for emphasis)
  • i
  • na (negative)

YorubaEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Yoruba alphabet, called and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


ZuluEdit

LetterEdit

y (lower case, upper case Y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Zulu alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit