Y U+0059, Y
LATIN CAPITAL LETTER Y
X
[U+0058]
Basic Latin Z
[U+005A]
U+FF39, Y
FULLWIDTH LATIN CAPITAL LETTER Y

[U+FF38]
Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms
[U+FF3A]

Translingual

edit
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology

edit

A late borrowing from the Ancient Greek letter Υ (U, ypsilon), first used to write Greek loanwords in Latin, derived from the Phoenician letter 𐤅 (w, waw), from the Egyptian hieroglyph 𓏲. Doublet of U and V.

Letter

edit

Y (lower case y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the basic modern Latin alphabet.

See also

edit

Symbol

edit

Y

  1. (chemistry) Symbol for yttrium
  2. (metrology) Symbol for prefix yotta-
  3. (genetics) IUPAC 1-letter abbreviation for any pyrimidine
  4. (biochemistry) IUPAC 1-letter abbreviation for tyrosine
  5. (travel, aviation) The reservation booking designator for the highest level of economy air fare.
  6. (mathematics, computer science) A Fixed-point combinator; especially Haskell Curry's combinator defined as λ f.(λ x.f (x x)) (λx.f (x x))
edit

See also

edit
The template Template:Letter does not use the parameter(s):
Character=Y
Please see Module:checkparams for help with this warning.

Other representations of Y:

English

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Etymology 1

edit

Letter

edit

Y (upper case, lower case y, plural Ys or Y's)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the English alphabet, called wye and written in the Latin script.
  2. Used for the Greek letter Υ (Y, upsilon).
See also
edit

Noun

edit

Y (plural Ys)

  1. A figure or mark in the shape of the letter Y.
  2. A Y-shaped object, such as a railroad fork or a support for a telescope; a wye, a bifurcation.
  3. (lepidopterology) A moth of the genus Plusia, having markings resembling the letter Y.
Derived terms
edit

Etymology 2

edit

Abbreviations.

Interjection

edit

Y

  1. Abbreviation of yes.

Noun

edit

Y (plural Ys)

  1. Abbreviation of year. (In some contexts as YY or YYYY to indicate only the last 2-digits or all 4-digits.)

Noun

edit

Y

  1. (stenoscript) Abbreviation of year.

Etymology 3

edit

Clippings.

Proper noun

edit

the Y

  1. (Canada, US) Clipping of the YMCA or YWCA.
    • 2001, Jonathan Franzen, The Corrections:
      He had sat next to Cindy returning from the Y and smelled the chlorine on her. A sodden Band-Aid had clung by a few lingering bits of stickum to her knee.

Noun

edit

Y (plural Ys)

  1. (Canada, US, informal) A particular facility run by the YMCA/YWCA.
    • a. 1969, John Kennedy Toole, A Confederacy of Dunces, Penguin, published 1981, →ISBN:
      Of course, the audience up here at the Bronx “Y” will probably be a little parochial, but if I make good in the lecture, I might one day end up speaking down at the Lex. Ave. “Y” where great thinkers like Norman Mailer and Seymour Krim are always airing their views.
    • 2021 May 17, Jane E. Brody, “A Birthday Milestone: Turning 80!”, in The New York Times[1], →ISSN:
      When a 50ish woman at my Y learned that I was about to turn 80, she exclaimed, “80 is the new 60, and you set a great example for the rest of us!”

Etymology 4

edit

See IJ.

Proper noun

edit

Y

  1. Obsolete form of IJ (a lake (formerly a bay) adjoining the city of Amsterdam, Netherlands).
    • 1813, William Müller, D. P., Topographical and Military Description of Germany and the Surrounding Country, 2nd edition, London: T. Egerton, pages 4–5:
      Amsterdam, Hol. fortif. on the gulf Y and the Amstel river, 27,000 ho. in the town, nearly as many in the suburbs; 210,000 inh. 1000 rp. 50,000 lm. 6000 sailors; well built, many canals, ground very damp and marshy, very clean streets, []

Afar

edit

Letter

edit

Y

  1. The twenty-second and final letter in the Afar alphabet.

See also

edit

Afrikaans

edit

Pronunciation

edit
  • (letter name): IPA(key): /əɪ̯/

Letter

edit

Y (upper case, lower case y)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Afrikaans alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also

edit

Noun

edit

Y (plural Y's, diminutive Y'tjie)

  1. Y

Azerbaijani

edit

Letter

edit

Y upper case (lower case y)

  1. The thirty-first letter of the Azerbaijani alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also

edit

Basque

edit

Pronunciation

edit
  • IPA(key): /i ɡreko/, [i ɣ̞re̞.ko̞]

Letter

edit

Y (upper case, lower case y)

  1. The twenty-sixth letter of the Basque alphabet, called i greko and written in the Latin script.

Usage notes

edit
  • Used chiefly in recent loanwords and foreign proper nouns.

See also

edit

Central Franconian

edit

Pronunciation

edit
  • /i/, (German-based also) /y/, /yː/

Letter

edit

Y

  1. A letter in the German-based alphabet of Central Franconian.
  2. A letter in the Dutch-based alphabet of Central Franconian.

Usage notes

edit
  • Only used rarely in loanwords, respectively after the German or Dutch cognate.

Chinese

edit

Pronunciation 1

edit

Note: Often realised as one syllable.
Note:
  • Often realised as one syllable;
  • 1ua often pronounced as 1hhua.

    Letter

    edit

    Y

    1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Latin alphabet.

    Pronunciation 2

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y

    1. The twenty-fifth letter used in Pinyin.
    Usage notes
    edit
    • 《汉语拼音方案》 defines a standard pronunciation for each letter. However, these pronunciations are rarely used in education; another pronunciation is commonly used instead.
    • The pronunciation above are only used while referring to letters in Pinyin. They are not used in other context (such as English).

    Dutch

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (capital, lowercase y)

    1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Dutch alphabet.

    See also

    edit
    • Previous letter: X
    • Next letter: Z

    Finnish

    edit

    Etymology

    edit

    The Finnish orthography using the Latin script was based on those of Swedish, German and Latin, and was first used in the mid-16th century. No earlier script is known. See the Wikipedia article on Finnish for more information, and Y for information on the development of the glyph itself. In particular, the use of y for /y/ follows the Swedish orthography, which in turn follows Latin.

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-fourth letter of the Finnish alphabet, called yy and written in the Latin script.

    Derived terms

    edit
    compounds

    See also

    edit

    German

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit
    • (letter name) IPA(key): /ˈʏpsilɔn/
    • (phoneme)
      • In Greek words generally /ʏ/, /yː/, but in unstressed syllables alternatively /i/ (e.g. in poly-).
      • In other borrowings, e.g. from English, /j/, /ɪ/, /iː/, /aɪ̯/, etc.
      • Natively only in proper nouns, mostly in -ay-, -ey-, both pronounced /aɪ̯/.

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-fifth letter of the German alphabet.

    Hungarian

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit
    • (phoneme): IPA(key): [ˈi]
    • (letter name): IPA(key): [ˈipsilon]

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. A letter of the extended Hungarian alphabet, called ipszilon and written in the Latin script.

    Declension

    edit
    Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
    singular plural
    nominative Y Y-ok
    accusative Y-t Y-okat
    dative Y-nak Y-oknak
    instrumental Y-nal Y-okkal
    causal-final Y-ért Y-okért
    translative Y-ná Y-okká
    terminative Y-ig Y-okig
    essive-formal Y-ként Y-okként
    essive-modal
    inessive Y-ban Y-okban
    superessive Y-on Y-okon
    adessive Y-nál Y-oknál
    illative Y-ba Y-okba
    sublative Y-ra Y-okra
    allative Y-hoz Y-okhoz
    elative Y-ból Y-okból
    delative Y-ról Y-okról
    ablative Y-tól Y-októl
    non-attributive
    possessive - singular
    Y-é Y-oké
    non-attributive
    possessive - plural
    Y-éi Y-okéi
    Possessive forms of Y
    possessor single possession multiple possessions
    1st person sing. Y-om Y-aim, Y-jaim
    2nd person sing. Y-od Y-aid, Y-jaid
    3rd person sing. Y-a, Y-ja Y-ai, Y-jai
    1st person plural Y-unk Y-aink, Y-jaink
    2nd person plural Y-otok Y-aitok, Y-jaitok
    3rd person plural Y-uk, Y-juk Y-aik, Y-jaik

    Derived terms

    edit

    See also

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (lower case y)

    1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Ido alphabet, written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Italian

    edit
     
    Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia it

    Pronunciation

    edit
    • (letter name) IPA(key): /i‿ɡˈɡrɛ.ka/, /i‿ɡˈɡrɛ.ko/, /ˈi.psi.lon/[1]
    • (phonemic realization) IPA(key): /j/, /i/ (varies depending on the loanword)

    Letter

    edit

    Y f or m (invariable, upper case, lower case y)

    1. the twenty-fifth letter of the Latin alphabet, called ipsilon, i greco or i greca in Italian

    Usage notes

    edit
    • The letter Y is not considered part of the Italian alphabet. It is found mainly in loanwords.

    See also

    edit

    References

    edit
    1. ^ Y in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

    Kashubian

    edit

    Etymology

    edit

    The Kashubian orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the Kashubian alphabet article on Wikipedia for more, and Y for development of the glyph itself.

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The thirty-first letter of the Kashubian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Lower Sorbian

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (lower case y)

    1. The thirty-first letter of the Lower Sorbian alphabet, called y and written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Malay

    edit
     
    Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia ms

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y

    1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Malay alphabet, written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Nupe

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Nupe alphabet, written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Polish

    edit

    Etymology

    edit

    The Polish orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the history of Polish orthography article on Wikipedia for more, and Y for development of the glyph itself.

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Polish alphabet, called y or igrek and written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Portuguese

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Portuguese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Noun

    edit

    Y m (plural Ys)

    1. fork (area where something forks)
      Synonyms: forquilha, bifurcação, ramificação

    Romanian

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The thirtieth letter of the Romanian alphabet, called igrec or i grec and written in the Latin script.

    Usage notes

    edit

    Used chiefly in recent loanwords and foreign proper nouns.

    See also

    edit

    Saanich

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y

    1. The thirty-seventh letter of the Saanich alphabet, written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Silesian

    edit

    Etymology

    edit

    The Silesian orthography is based on the Latin alphabet. No earlier script is known. See the Silesian language article on Wikipedia for more, and Y for development of the glyph itself.

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The thirty-first letter of the Silesian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Slovene

    edit
     
    Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
    Wikipedia sl

    Letter

    edit

    Y (capital, lowercase y)

    1. The thirty-third letter of the Slovene alphabet (Resian), written in the Latin script.

    Somali

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit
    • (phoneme): IPA(key): /ʝ/, /ɪ̯/, /i̯/
    • (letter name): IPA(key): /ʝæ/

    Letter

    edit

    Y upper case (lower case y)

    1. The twenty-second letter of the Somali alphabet, called ya and written in the Latin script.

    Usage notes

    edit
    1. The twenty-second letter of the Somali alphabet, which follows Arabic abjad order. It is preceded by H and followed by A.

    See also

    edit

    Spanish

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. the 26th letter of the Spanish alphabet

    Tagalog

    edit

    Etymology

    edit

    Borrowed from Spanish Y. Each pronunciation has a different source:

    • Filipino alphabet pronunciation is influenced by English Y.
    • Abakada alphabet pronunciation is influenced by Baybayin character (ya).
    • Abecedario pronunciation is from Spanish Y.

    Pronunciation

    edit
    • (Standard Tagalog)
      • IPA(key): /ˈwaj/ [ˈwaɪ̯] (letter name, Filipino alphabet)
      • IPA(key): /ˈja/ [ˈja] (letter name, Abakada alphabet)
        • Rhymes: -a
      • IPA(key): /ˈje/ [ˈjɛ] (letter name, Abecedario)
        • Rhymes: -e
      • IPA(key): /j/ [j] (phoneme)
      • IPA(key): /i/ [ɪ] (phoneme, used as a vowel)
        • Rhymes: -i

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y, Baybayin spelling ᜏᜌ᜔)

    1. The twenty-seventh letter of the Tagalog alphabet (the Filipino alphabet), called way and written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y, Baybayin spelling )

    1. The twentieth letter of the Tagalog alphabet (the Abakada alphabet), called ya and written in the Latin script.

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y, Baybayin spelling ᜌᜒ)

    1. (historical) The twenty-seventh letter of the Tagalog alphabet (the Abecedario), called ye and written in the Latin script.

    Further reading

    edit
    • Y”, in Pambansang Diksiyonaryo | Diksiyonaryo.ph, Manila, 2018

    Turkish

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Turkish alphabet, called ye and written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Vietnamese

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit
    • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [ʔi˧˧ zaːj˨˩], [ʔi˧˧ ɣəː˨˩ zɛt̚˧˦]
    • (Huế) IPA(key): [ʔɪj˧˧ jaːj˦˩], [ʔɪj˧˧ ɣəː˦˩ ʐɛt̚˦˧˥]
    • (Saigon) IPA(key): [ʔɪj˧˧ jaːj˨˩], [ʔɪj˧˧ ɣəː˨˩ ɹɛk̚˦˥]
    • Phonetic spelling: i dài, i gờ rét

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Vietnamese alphabet, called i dài or i gờ-rét and written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Welsh

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit
    • (standard) IPA(key): /ə/, /əː/

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Welsh alphabet, called e and written in the Latin script. It is preceded by W.

    Mutation

    edit
    • Y cannot be mutated but, being a vowel, does take h-prothesis, for example with the word ysgol (school; ladder):
    Welsh mutation
    radical soft nasal h-prothesis
    ysgol unchanged unchanged hysgol
    Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

    See also

    edit

    Further reading

    edit
    • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “Y”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

    Yoruba

    edit

    Pronunciation

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Yoruba alphabet, called and written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit

    Zulu

    edit

    Letter

    edit

    Y (upper case, lower case y)

    1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Zulu alphabet, written in the Latin script.

    See also

    edit