Hungarian

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From -o- (linking vowel) +‎ -d (possessive suffix).

Suffix

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-od

  1. (possessive suffix) your (second-person singular informal, single possession)
    kor (age) + ‎-od → ‎korod (your age)
Usage notes
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  • (possessive suffix) Variants:
    -d is added to words ending in a vowel. Final -a changes to -á-. Final -e changes to -é-.
    -ad is added to some back-vowel words ending in a consonant
    -od is added to the other back-vowel words ending in a consonant
    -ed is added to unrounded (and some rounded) front-vowel words ending in a consonant
    -öd is added to most rounded front-vowel words ending in a consonant

Etymology 2

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From -o- (linking vowel) +‎ -d (personal suffix).

Suffix

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-od

  1. (personal suffix) Forms the definite second-person singular indicative present of verbs.
    olvas (to read) + ‎-od → ‎olvasod (you read something, you are reading something)
Usage notes
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  • (personal suffix) See harmonic variants in the table below.

Etymology 3

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Suffix

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-od

  1. (fraction-forming suffix) Added to a cardinal number to form a fraction. Variants: -d, -ad, -ed, -öd.
    hat (six) + ‎-od → ‎hatod ([one] sixth)
Derived terms
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See also

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Old English

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Pronunciation

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Suffix

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-od

  1. Used to form the past participle of class II weak verbs
    lufian (to love) + ‎-od → ‎lufod (loved)

Volapük

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Suffix

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-od

  1. Used to indicate a softer or less serious example

Derived terms

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Welsh

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Suffix

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-od

  1. forming plural nouns, -s
    Synonyms: -aid, -aint, -au, -ed, -edd, -en, -i, -iadau, -iaid, -iau, -ion, -oedd, -on, -ydd, -yr, -ys
    buwch (cow) + ‎-od → ‎buchod (cows)
    cath (cat) + ‎-od → ‎cathod (cats)
    eliffant (elephant) + ‎-od → ‎eliffantod (elephants)
    menyw (woman) + ‎-od → ‎menywod (women)
    Gwyddel (Irish man) + ‎-od → ‎Gwyddelod (Irish people)
Usage notes
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This suffix is used in forming the plural of many animals.

Etymology 2

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Suffix

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-od

  1. blow, stroke
    dwrn (fist) + ‎-od → ‎dyrnod (punch, thump)
    cleddyf (sword) + ‎-od → ‎cleddyfod (sword stroke, gash)
    ffon (stick) + ‎-od → ‎ffonnod (stroke with a stick, stripe)
Usage notes
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Unusually, this suffix has no fixed gender but instead takes on the gender of the root word it modifies.

Etymology 3

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Alternative forms

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Suffix

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-od m

  1. noun having the characteristics of
    rhyfedd (strange, wondrous) + ‎-od → ‎rhyfeddod (wonder)
Derived terms
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