See also: Lave, lavé, lavě, låve, and ľavé

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English laven (to wash; pour out; stream; bail or draw water, drain, exhaust), from Old English lafian, ġelafian (to pour; refresh), from Proto-West Germanic *labōn (to refresh; revive; strengthen), of uncertain origin. Influenced by Old French laver and Latin lavō (to wash, bathe).[1] Sometimes compared to Ancient Greek λωφάω (lōpháō, to recover, rest), also of unknown origin.[2]

Verb

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lave (third-person singular simple present laves, present participle laving, simple past and past participle laved)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To pour or throw out, as water; lade out; bail; bail out.
    • a. 1701 (date written), John Dryden, “The Last Parting of Hector and Andromache. From the Sixth Book of the Iliad.”, in The Miscellaneous Works of John Dryden, [], volume IV, London: [] J[acob] and R[ichard] Tonson, [], published 1760, →OCLC:
      From that fair flood which Ilion's wall did lave
  2. (transitive) To draw, as water; drink in.
  3. (transitive) To give bountifully; lavish.
  4. (intransitive) To run down or gutter, as a candle.
  5. (intransitive, dialectal) To hang or flap down.
  6. (transitive, intransitive, literary or poetic) To wash.
    • 1713, Alexander Pope, “Windsor-Forest. []”, in The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope, volume I, London: [] W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintot, [], published 1717, →OCLC:
      In her chaste current oft the goddess laves.
    • 1789, William Lisle Bowles, 'Sonnet I' from, Fourteen Sonnets:
      the tranquil tide, / That laves the pebbled shore.
    • a. 1749 (date written), James Thomson, “Summer”, in The Seasons, London: [] A[ndrew] Millar, and sold by Thomas Cadell, [], published 1768, →OCLC:
      Delicious is your shelter to the soul, / As to the hunted hart the sallying spring, / Or stream full-flowing, that his swelling sides / Laves, as he floats along the herbaged brink
    • 1865, Walt Whitman, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d”, in Sequel to Drum-Taps: When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d and other poems:
      [] Lost in the loving floating ocean of thee, / Laved in the flood of thy bliss O death.
  7. To lick.
    • 2011 July 15, Miranda Lee, The Boss's Baby, Harlequin, →ISBN:
      [] he drawled, and bent to lave each nipple with his tongue till the satin was wet and clinging.
    • 2011 August 1, Eliza Knight, A Lady's Charade, Eliza Knight, →ISBN, page 122:
      Alexander went from laving at her breasts to nuzzling her belly and then his mouth was on her bare thigh, nibbling at her flesh as his fingers delved inside her sheath. She felt herself stretch and squeeze against his long fingers.
    • 2014 February 21, Scarlet Blackwell, Beached Hearts, Totally Entwined Group (USA+CAD), →ISBN:
      Liam's mouth was so hot and wet on his cock, his tongue so wicked, laving his shaft expertly with smooth, slick strokes, delving into his slit and swiping away the fluid leaking from it. Why was Liam doing this?
    • 2014 May 1, Leslie Kelly, Jo Leigh, Karen Foley, Susanna Carr, Harlequin Blaze May 2014 Bundle: An Anthology, Harlequin, →ISBN:
      He continued to lave her with gentle laps, while his fingers caressed her until she cried out and her whole body convulsed. He felt her muscles contracting around his fingers, but he didn't stop until he'd wrung every last shiver from [her].
    • 2015 June 11, Melissa Foster, Healed by Love (Love in Bloom: The Bradens), World Literary Press:
      He pressed them back down and continued licking, laving at her as her inner muscles contracted around his fingers and she panted out his name. He didn't relent until the last shudder rippled through her beautiful body.
    • 2016 April 15, Elizabeth Lennox, The Prince's Forbidden Lover, Elizabeth Lennox Books LLC, →ISBN:
      [] but it took only a few moments of his tongue laving at her core before she was exploding in a mind-drugging climax that made her throat sore from her cries.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Inherited from Northern Middle English lave (remainder, rest, that which is left), from Old English lāf (lave, remainder, rest), from Proto-West Germanic *laibu, from Proto-Germanic *laibō (remainder), from Proto-Indo-European *leyp- (to stick, glue).

Cognate with Old High German leiba (lave), Old Norse leif (lave), Old English belīfan (to remain). More at belive.

Alternative forms

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Noun

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lave (uncountable)

  1. (archaic or dialectal) The remainder, rest; that which is left, remnant; others.
    • 1885, Richard F. Burton, chapter XII, in The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, volume I, The Burton Club, page 114:
      Then they set upon us and slew some of my slaves and put the lave to flight[.]
    • 1896 (posthumously), Robert Louis Stevenson, Songs of Travel and other verses.[3]
      Give to me the life I love, / Let the lave go by me...
  2. (dialectal) A crowd
    • 1807, Ancient historic ballads - Page 72:
      Of prelates proud, a populous lave, And abbots boldly there were known.
Synonyms
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References

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  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge (1989) “laben”, in Elmar Seebold, editor, Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache [Etymological Dictionary of the German Language] (in German), 22nd edition, Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN, page 423:wg. *lab-ō- swV. ‘erfrischen, waschen’
  2. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) “885”, in Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page λωφάω
  3. ^ [1]

Anagrams

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Danish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈlaːvə/, [ˈlɛːʋə], [ˈlɛːʊ]
  • Rhymes: -aːvə

Etymology 1

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From Old Norse laga, derived from lag (layer). Cognate with Norwegian lage, Swedish laga.

Verb

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lave (imperative lav, infinitive at lave, present tense laver, past tense lavede, perfect tense har lavet)

  1. to make, create, construct, produce
    Denne fabrik laver madrasser.
    This factory makes mattresses.
  2. to cook, prepare
    at lave mad
    to cook (lit. "to make food")
    Jeg laver kødboller til aftensmad.
    I'm making meatballs for dinner.
  3. to do
    Hvad skal vi lave i dag?
    What shall we do today?
  4. to repair, mend, fix
    Skal jeg lave din jakke?
    Shall I fix your jacket?
Conjugation
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Adjective

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lave

  1. definite of lav
  2. plural of lav

Etymology 3

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

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lave c

  1. (obsolete) dative singular indefinite of lag
Usage notes
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Only used in the fixed expression af lave (out of order).

French

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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lave f (plural laves)

  1. (usually uncountable) lava

Derived terms

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Verb

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lave

  1. inflection of laver:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Galician

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Verb

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lave

  1. inflection of lavar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Haitian Creole

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Etymology

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From French laver (wash).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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lave

  1. to wash

Italian

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Noun

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lave f

  1. plural of lava

Anagrams

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Middle English

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Etymology 1

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Noun

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lave

  1. (Northern) Alternative form of love (remainder)

Etymology 2

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Verb

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lave

  1. Alternative form of laven

Norwegian Bokmål

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Adjective

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lave

  1. definite singular of lav
  2. plural of lav

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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lave

  1. inflection of lavar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Romanian

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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lave f

  1. inflection of lavă:
    1. indefinite plural
    2. indefinite genitive/dative singular

Scots

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Etymology

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Middle Scots lave, laif, lafe (remainder, rest, that which is left), from Old English lāf (lave, remainder, rest). Akin to Old High German leiba (lave), Old Norse leif (lave), Old English belīfan (to remain). More at leave.

Noun

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lave

  1. (archaic) rest, remainder.
    Ye are bit a wumman lik the lave, an ye maun thole the brunt o whit life mey bring. — Janet's Love and Service

Spanish

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Verb

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lave

  1. inflection of lavar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Swedish

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Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv
 
lave (tower)
 
sauna with two benches (lave)

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Swedish lavi, possibly from the root of loge (kind of barn), from which is the Norwegian Nynorsk låve derived from.

The other version derives it to Slavic origins, through Finnish. Ultimately from Proto-Balto-Slavic *lā́ˀwāˀ. Cognate with modern Russian лавка (lavka) and modern Finnish lava.

May be of two different origins, as it is two different meanings of the word.

Noun

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lave c

  1. a towerlike building atop a mine shaft, common in Scandinavia during 19th century
    Synonym: gruvlave
  2. a wooden bench in a sauna
    Synonyms: bastulave, lav

Declension

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Declension of lave 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative lave laven lavar lavarna
Genitive laves lavens lavars lavarnas

References

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Anagrams

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