See also: IMO, Imo, and -imo

EnglishEdit

Prepositional phraseEdit

imo

  1. Alternative form of IMO.

AnagramsEdit


AklanonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *imu.

PronounEdit

imo

  1. you

CebuanoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

imo

  1. you (2nd person singular preposed ergative form)
  2. (in the singular) yours
  3. (slang, humorous) one's genitalia

See alsoEdit



ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈi.mo/
  • Rhymes: -imo
  • Hyphenation: ì‧mo

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin īmus, superlative form of īnferus (low”, “deep), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *n̥dʰér.

AdjectiveEdit

imo (feminine ima, masculine plural imi, feminine plural ime) (obsolete, poetic)

  1. (literally) located in the lowest or innermost part
  2. (by extension) low, deep
    Synonym: infero
    • 1374, Francesco Petrarca, “Pommi ove 'l sole occide i fiori et l'erba” (Il Canzoniere, Andrea Bettini (1858), p.143) :
      Ponm' in cielo od in terra od in abisso, ¶ in alto poggio, in valle ima e palustre, ¶ libero spirto, od a' suoi membri affisso; [...]
      Set me in heaven, on earth, or in the depths, ¶ on a high hill, or in a deep marshy vale, ¶ a spirit freed, or imprisoned in its limbs; [...]
    • 1850, Giosuè Carducci, “La selva primitiva” (Juvenilia, Poesie, Nicola Zanichelli (1906), p. 109, Libro LVII), vv. 43-44:
      [...] un tremor gelido ¶ per l'ossa ime gli corse; e s'atterrava, ¶ e gemea [...]
      [...] a freezing chill ¶ ran through his deep bones; and he dropped ¶ and wailed [...]
  3. (figuratively, of people) of a low social status
    • 1581, Torquato Tasso, Gerusalemme liberata, Erasmo Viotti, p.222, Canto IX:
      Miete i vili, e i potenti: e i più sublimi ¶ e più superbi capi adegua agl’imi.
      It breaks vile and mighty alike: and makes the noblest ¶ and proudest leaders one with the lowest.
  4. (rare, figuratively, of things) inappropriate, vulgar, uncouth
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin īmum, substantivization of the neuter form of īmus (lowest”, “deepest).

NounEdit

imo m (plural imi)

  1. (obsolete) bottom; base
    Synonyms: (more common) base, (more common) fondo
    Antonyms: apice, culmine, sommità, vetta
    • 1472, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno, Le Monnier (1994), Canto XXIX, p. 430, vv. 37-39:
      Così parlammo infino al loco primo ¶ che dello scoglio l'altra valle mostra, ¶ se più lume vi fosse, tutto ad imo.
      Thus did we speak as far as the first place ¶ upon the crag, which the next valley shows ¶ down to the bottom, if there were more light.

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

imo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of いも

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant form.

AdverbEdit

imō (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of immō
    • c. 405, Saint Jerome, Epistola 106:
      Quis hoc crederet, ut barbara Getarum lingua Hebraicam quaereret veritatem; et dormitantibus, imo contendentibus Graecis, ipsa Germania Spiritus Sancti eloquia scrutaretur!
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

AdjectiveEdit

īmō

  1. dative masculine singular of īmus
  2. dative neuter singular of īmus
  3. ablative masculine singular of īmus
  4. ablative neuter singular of īmus

ReferencesEdit

  • imo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • imo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • imo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Regularised form.

VerbEdit

imo

  1. (proscribed, Caipira) first-person plural (nós) future indicative of ir

UmbunduEdit

NounEdit

imo (i-ova class, plural ovamo)

  1. belly