See also: Amo., amò, amó, and амо

Contents

AfarEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. head

CatalanEdit

NounEdit

amo m ‎(plural amos)

  1. owner (of a piece of land or real estate, a business, etc.)
  2. master

VerbEdit

amo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of amar

ChickasawEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. to mow

ChuukeseEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. may
  2. to let
    • 2010, Ewe Kapasen God, United Bible Societies, ISBN 9781920714000, Könupin 58:7-8, page 775:
      Amo repwe mȯronȯ ussun chok konik mi chok nichino. Amo repwe pachchacheno ussun chok ekkewe fetin won aan. Amo repwe ussun chok ekkewe pwechar sia puriretiw. Amo repwe ussun chok emon mönukon mi mȧ nupwen a uputiw.
      Let them disappear like water leaking. Let them stick like the grass on the ground. Let them be like the snail we step on. Let them be like a newborn who is dead when he is born.

Classical NahuatlEdit

ParticleEdit

amo

  1. Alternative spelling of ahmo

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈamo/
  • Hyphenation: a‧mo
  • Rhymes: -amo

NounEdit

amo ‎(accusative singular amon, plural amoj, accusative plural amojn)

  1. love

Derived termsEdit


GalicianEdit

HawaiianEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. burden

VerbEdit

amo

  1. (transitive) to carry (on the shoulders)

IdoEdit

NounEdit

amo (plural ami)

  1. love

Derived termsEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin hāmus.

NounEdit

amo m ‎(plural ami)

  1. hook

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin amō.

VerbEdit

amo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of amare

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

NounEdit

amo m ‎(Latin spelling)

  1. boss, owner

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from Proto-Indo-European *am-a-, *am- ‎(mother, aunt), a lost nursery-word of the papa-type. Compare amita ‎(aunt), Old High German amma ‎(nurse). Alternatively, O. Hackstein suggests Proto-Indo-European *h₂emh₃- ‎(seize).

VerbEdit

amō ‎(present infinitive amāre, perfect active amāvī, supine amātum); first conjugation

  1. I love
    • Plautus
      Tu me amas, ego te amo.
      You love me, I love you.
    • Seneca Senior
      Si vis amari, ama.
      If you wish to be loved, love.
  2. I am fond of, like
  3. I am under obligation to; I am obliged to
  4. (with infinitive) to enjoy, be accustomed
ConjugationEdit

Note: amasti is sometimes used in place of amavisti.

   Conjugation of amo (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amō amās amat amāmus amātis amant
imperfect amābam amābās amābat amābāmus amābātis amābant
future amābō amābis amābit amābimus amābitis amābunt
perfect amāvī amāvistī amāvit amāvimus amāvistis amāvērunt, amāvēre
pluperfect amāveram amāverās amāverat amāverāmus amāverātis amāverant
future perfect amāverō amāveris amāverit amāverimus amāveritis amāverint
passive present amor amāris, amāre amātur amāmur amāminī amantur
imperfect amābar amābāris, amābāre amābātur amābāmur amābāminī amābantur
future amābor amāberis, amābere amābitur amābimur amābiminī amābuntur
perfect amātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect amātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect amātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amem amēs amet amēmus amētis ament
imperfect amārem amārēs amāret amārēmus amārētis amārent
perfect amāverim amāverīs amāverit amāverīmus amāverītis amāverint
pluperfect amāvissem amāvissēs amāvisset amāvissēmus amāvissētis amāvissent
passive present amer amēris, amēre amētur amēmur amēminī amentur
imperfect amārer amārēris, amārēre amārētur amārēmur amārēminī amārentur
perfect amātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect amātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amā amāte
future amātō amātō amātōte amantō
passive present amāre amāminī
future amātor amātor amantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives amāre amāvisse amātūrus esse amārī amātus esse amātum īrī
participles amāns amātūrus amātus amandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
amāre amandī amandō amandum amātum amātū
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart: aliquem toto pectore, ut dicitur, amare (Leg. 18. 49)
    • to love deeply: aliquem ex animo or ex animi sententia amare (Q. Fr. 1. 1. 5)

Etymology 2Edit

See hama.

NounEdit

amō ? ‎(genitive amōnis); third declension

  1. medieval spelling of hama
DeclensionEdit

Third declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative amō amōnēs
genitive amōnis amōnum
dative amōnī amōnibus
accusative amōnem amōnēs
ablative amōne amōnibus
vocative amō amōnēs

ReferencesEdit

  • amo in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • amo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • AMO” in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • amo” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart: aliquem toto pectore, ut dicitur, amare (Leg. 18. 49)
    • to love deeply: aliquem ex animo or ex animi sententia amare (Q. Fr. 1. 1. 5)
  • amo” on page 41/2 of Jan Frederik Niermeyer’s Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus (1976)

MaoriEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. carry (on a litter)

MaquiritariEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. to cry, weep

ReferencesEdit

  • Ed. Key, Mary Ritchie and Comrie, Bernard. The Intercontinental Dictionary Series, Carib (De'kwana).

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese amo, from ama.

NounEdit

amo m (plural amos)

  1. master
  2. boss

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of amar

Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /âːmo/
  • Hyphenation: a‧mo

AdverbEdit

ȃmo ‎(Cyrillic spelling а̑мо)

  1. hither, here
  2. this way

SynonymsEdit


ShaboEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. (intransitive) to come

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From ama.

NounEdit

amo m ‎(plural amos, feminine ama)

  1. master

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of amar.

TsouEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. father
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