See also: amó, amò, amö, Amo., амо, and -amo

AfarEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ʌˈmo/
  • Hyphenation: a‧mo

NounEdit

amó f (plural amoomá f)

  1. head
  2. intelligence
  3. summit, top
  4. (collective) hair

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “amo”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[1], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

AsiEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. monkey

Bikol CentralEdit

NounEdit

amô

  1. (Naga) monkey
    Synonym: (Legazpi) ukay

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Back-formation from ama (mistress).

NounEdit

amo m (plural amos, feminine ama)

  1. owner (of a piece of land or real estate, a business, etc.)
  2. master

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

amo

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of amar

Further readingEdit

  • “amo” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

ChickasawEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. to mow

ChuukeseEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. may
  2. to let
    • 2010, Ewe Kapasen God, United Bible Societies, →ISBN, Könupin 58:7-8, page 775:
      Amo repwe mȯronȯ ussun chok konik mi chok nichino. Amo repwe pachchacheno ussun chok ekkewe fetin won aan. Amo repwe ussun chok ekkewe pwechar sia puriretiw. Amo repwe ussun chok emon mönukon mi mȧ nupwen a uputiw.
      Let them disappear like water leaking. Let them stick like the grass on the ground. Let them be like the snail we step on. Let them be like a newborn who is dead when he is born.

Classical NahuatlEdit

ParticleEdit

amo

  1. Alternative spelling of ahmo

EseEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. father

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ami +‎ -o.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈamo/
  • Hyphenation: am‧o
  • Rhymes: -amo
  • Audio:
    (file)

NounEdit

amo (accusative singular amon, plural amoj, accusative plural amojn)

  1. love
    • Kiu dissemas amon, tiu rikoltos la samon.
      Whoever sows love will harvest the same.
      —Proverb by Morteza Mirbaghian
    • Edmond Privat, Vivo de Zamenhof, Ĉapitro 2,
      Similaj amoj inter filo kaj patrino ĉe multaj geniuloj estas ofte rimarkeblaj. Pope, Musset, Lamartine adoris la patrinon sian, kaj al ŝi tre multon ŝuldis. Same Zamenhof.
      Similar close relationships (lit. loves) between sons and mothers can often been seen in geniuses. Pope, Musset and Lamartine all adored their mothers and owed much to them. The same was true of Zamenhof.

Related termsEdit


GalicianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From ama (mistress), from Hispanic Late Latin amma, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *amma- (mother).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

amo m (plural amos)

  1. (archaic) tutor
    Synonym: titor
  2. (archaic) steward
    Synonym: mordomo
  3. (archaic) landlord
    • 1814, Manuel Pardo de Andrade, Aos coruñeses:
      En certa aldea traballou o ano pasado certo labrador certa porcion de terra: chegada a recolleita foi a segar, e colleu vinte pares de monllos, deles pagou o señor cura duos pares do desmo, pagou nove o señor amo; logo veu o señor cura, e rapoulle cinco polas toucas, quedaronlle catro, mallounos, e non lle deron un ferrado
      in certain village last year certain farmer farmed certain apportion of land: as the harvest came he went to reap; he collected twenty pairs of sheaves; of them he paid two pairs to the priest for the tithe, nine he paid to the landlord; then the priest came again and snatched five for the ecclesiastical services; he was left with four; he threshed them and obtained less than half a bushel
  4. master
    Synonyms: dono, patrón, propietario

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

amo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of amar

ReferencesEdit

  • amo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • amo” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • amo” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • amo” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • amo” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

HawaiianEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. burden

VerbEdit

amo

  1. (transitive) to carry (on the shoulders)

HiligaynonEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. monkey

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Esperanto amo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

amo (plural ami)

  1. love

Derived termsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Riau Malay [Term?].

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈamo/
  • Hyphenation: amo

NounEdit

amo (first-person possessive amoku, second-person possessive amomu, third-person possessive amonya)

  1. white mite in rice husks.

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin hāmus. Compare Spanish hamo, French hameçon.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

amo m (plural ami)

  1. hook
  2. (figuratively) bait
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

amo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of amare

Further readingEdit

  • amo in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

AnagramsEdit


KaraoEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. master

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

amo m (Latin spelling)

  1. boss, owner

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *amāō, of disputed etymology. Possibly from Proto-Indo-European *am-a-, *am- (mother, aunt), a lost nursery-word of the papa-type. Compare amita (aunt), Old High German amma (nurse). Alternatively, Olav Hackstein and Michiel De Vaan suggest a derivation from Proto-Indo-European *h₃emh₃- (to seize, to take hold) via Proto-Italic *amāō (to take hold), applying a semantic shift “to take by the hand” > “to regard as a friend” > “to love, to be fond of”.

VerbEdit

amō (present infinitive amāre, perfect active amāvī, supine amātum); first conjugation

  1. I love
  2. I am fond of, like, admire
    Synonyms: dīligō, probō, approbō, comprobō
    Antonyms: improbō, reprobō
  3. I am pleased by or with (someone or something) for (a particular reason); I derive pleasure from...(for...), delight in...(for...)
    Synonym: dēlector
    • 17 BCE, Horace, Carmen Saeculare :
      ...hīc magnōs potius triumphōs, hīc amēs dīcī pater atque prī̆nceps, neu sinās Mēdōs equitāre inultōs // tē duce, Caesar.
      ...rather, may you delight in these great triumphs, to be called father and the first man (of state), and may you not allow the Medes to ride unpunished while you lead, Caesar.
    1. (with ) I am pleased (with oneself), I am content
  4. (with infinitive) I am accustomed (to), enjoy an activity
    Synonyms: assuefio, fruor
  5. I am thankful, grateful to, feel obliged for a service
    • c. 185 BCE – 159 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, The Eunuch :
      Ō Thāis mea, meum sāvium, quid agitur? Ecquid nōs amās dē fīdīcinā istāc?
      O Thais, my sweetie, what's happening? Are you grateful to us for that harpist?
    • ~160 BCE, Publius Terentius Afer, The Brothers :
      Bene facis, meritō tē amō.
      You're very kind, I'm rightly obliged to you.
    • 68 BCE – 44 BCE, Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum CXXIII, (The phrase raudusculo Numeriano, "Numerius' bit of coin", here refers to a small monetary debt assumedly having been owed by Cicero to Numerius, and paid for Cicero by Atticus):
      Dē raudusculō Numeriānō multum tē amō.
      Regarding Numerius' bit of coin I am very much obliged to you.
ConjugationEdit
   Conjugation of amō (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amō amās amat amāmus amātis amant
imperfect amābam amābās amābat amābāmus amābātis amābant
future amābō amābis amābit amābimus amābitis amābunt
perfect amāvī amāvistī, amāstī1 amāvit amāvimus amāvistis, amāstis1 amāvērunt, amāvēre
pluperfect amāveram amāverās amāverat amāverāmus amāverātis amāverant
future perfect amāverō amāveris amāverit amāverimus amāveritis amāverint
passive present amor amāris, amāre amātur amāmur amāminī amantur
imperfect amābar amābāris, amābāre amābātur amābāmur amābāminī amābantur
future amābor amāberis, amābere amābitur amābimur amābiminī amābuntur
perfect amātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect amātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect amātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amem amēs amet amēmus amētis ament
imperfect amārem amārēs amāret amārēmus amārētis amārent
perfect amāverim amāverīs amāverit amāverīmus amāverītis amāverint
pluperfect amāvissem, amāssem1 amāvissēs, amāssēs1 amāvisset, amāsset1 amāvissēmus, amāssēmus1 amāvissētis, amāssētis1 amāvissent, amāssent1
passive present amer amēris, amēre amētur amēmur amēminī amentur
imperfect amārer amārēris, amārēre amārētur amārēmur amārēminī amārentur
perfect amātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect amātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present amā amāte
future amātō amātō amātōte amantō
passive present amāre amāminī
future amātor amātor amantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives amāre amāvisse, amāsse1 amātūrum esse amārī amātum esse amātum īrī
participles amāns amātūrus amātus amandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
amandī amandō amandum amandō amātum amātū

1At least one rare poetic syncopated perfect form is attested.

Old forms:

Usage notesEdit

The ancient Romans were accustomed to saying "I shall/will love you!" ("te amabo"/"amabo te") in supplication, and "I love you!" ("te amo") when they were expressing gratitude. Latin "amare" has a broader semantic range than English "to love", and so can be a semantically "weaker" or, perhaps, less intense a verb. Amare was therefore appropriate for speech etiquette in situations of supplication or the expression of gratitude. Because of the semantic differences between the Latin and English verbs, and especially of the narrower semantic range of English "to love", a literal translation into English will in such cases (involving supplication or gratitude) inevitably appear strange. Accordingly, translators have ever resorted to expressions like "appreciate", "be thankful" and "be obliged" as a workaround, but in such cases the Romans actually meant "love" as they construed that emotion.

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart: aliquem toto pectore, ut dicitur, amare (Leg. 18. 49)
    • to love deeply: aliquem ex animo or ex animi sententia amare (Q. Fr. 1. 1. 5)

Etymology 2Edit

See hama.

NounEdit

amō f (genitive amōnis); third declension

  1. medieval spelling of hama
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative amō amōnēs
Genitive amōnis amōnum
Dative amōnī amōnibus
Accusative amōnem amōnēs
Ablative amōne amōnibus
Vocative amō amōnēs

ReferencesEdit

  • amo in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • amo in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • amo in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • amo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[3], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to love some one very dearly, with all one's heart: aliquem toto pectore, ut dicitur, amare (Leg. 18. 49)
    • to love deeply: aliquem ex animo or ex animi sententia amare (Q. Fr. 1. 1. 5)
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “amo”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 41/2

MaguindanaoEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. monkey

MaoriEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. carry (on a litter)
  2. charge, attack

MaquiritariEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. to cry, weep

ReferencesEdit

  • Ed. Key, Mary Ritchie and Comrie, Bernard. The Intercontinental Dictionary Series, Carib (De'kwana).

OjibweEdit

VerbEdit

amo (3s-3' independent form odamwaan, changed conjunct form emwaad, 2s-3 imperative form amo or amwi, reduplicated form ayamo)

  1. eat
    Ingii-amwaa wiishkobi-bakwezhigan gii-tibishkaayaan.
    I ate cake when I had my birthday.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /ˈɐ̃.mu/, [ˈɐ̃.mu]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /ˈɐ.mu/, [ˈɐ.mu]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese amo, from ama.

NounEdit

amo m (plural amos)

  1. master
  2. boss

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

amo

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of amar



Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /âːmo/
  • Hyphenation: a‧mo

AdverbEdit

ȃmo (Cyrillic spelling а̑мо)

  1. hither, here
  2. this way

SynonymsEdit


ShaboEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. (intransitive) to come

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Back-formation from ama.

NounEdit

amo m (plural amos, feminine ama, feminine plural amas)

  1. master (man who owns a slave)
  2. owner, master, keeper (man who owns an animal)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

VerbEdit

amo

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of amar.

Further readingEdit


TagalogEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Spanish amo (master of the house).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: a‧mo
  • IPA(key): /ˈʔamo/, [ˈʔɐmo]

NounEdit

amo

  1. master; employer; boss
    Synonyms: hepe, panginoon
  2. pet owner; caretaker (of an animal)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: a‧mo
  • IPA(key): /ˈʔamoʔ/, [ˈʔɐmoʔ]

NounEdit

amò

  1. gentleness; docility
  2. tameness (of animals)
  3. supplication; coaxing
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Compare Bikol Central amo (monkey), Cuyunon amoy (small monkey), and Hiligaynon amo (monkey).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: a‧mo
  • IPA(key): /ʔaˈmoʔ/, [ʔɐˈmoʔ]

NounEdit

amo

  1. a type of small monkey

TernateEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
Amo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. breadfruit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

amo

  1. (stative) to be thick

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Tetelcingo NahuatlEdit

AdverbEdit

amo

  1. Not, negation.

ReferencesEdit

  • Brewer, Forrest; Brewer, Jean G. (1962) Vocabulario mexicano de Tetelcingo, Morelos, segunda impresión edition, México, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, published 1971

TsouEdit

NounEdit

amo

  1. father