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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English parent, borrowed from Anglo-Norman parent, Middle French parent, from Latin parentem, accusative of parēns (parent), present participle of parere (to breed, bring forth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

parent (plural parents)

  1. One of the two persons from whom one is immediately biologically descended; a mother or father. [from 15th c.]
    • c. 1595, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, First Folio 1623, I.2:
      my trust / Like a good parent, did beget of him / A falsehood in it's contrarie, as great / As my trust was, which had indeede no limit, / A confidence sans bound.
    • And they asked them, saying, Is this your son, who ye say was born blind? how then doth he now see? His parents answered them and said, We know that this is our son, and that he was born blind []
    • 2005, Siobhan O'Neill, The Guardian, 24 Aug 2005:
      The NHS is naturally pro-immunisation, reassuring parents that their babies can easily cope with these jabs.
    Synonym: progenitor
    Antonyms: child, offspring
    Hyponyms: father, mother
  2. A surrogate mother
  3. A third person who has provided DNA samples in an IVF procedure in order to alter faulty genetic material
  4. A person who acts as a parent in rearing a child; a step-parent or adoptive parent.
    • 2013 June 7, Joseph Stiglitz, “Globalisation is about taxes too”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 188, number 26, page 19:
      It is time the international community faced the reality: we have an unmanageable, unfair, distortionary global tax regime. […] It is the starving of the public sector which has been pivotal in America no longer being the land of opportunity – with a child's life prospects more dependent on the income and education of its parents than in other advanced countries.
  5. (obsolete) A relative. [15th-18th c.]
  6. The source or origin of something. [from 16th c.]
    • 1785, Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia:
      Misery is often the parent of the most affecting touches in poetry.
  7. (biology) An organism from which a plant or animal is immediately biologically descended. [from 17th c.]
  8. (attributive) Sponsor, supporter, owner, protector. [1]
    • 1944, Miles Burton, The Three Corpse Trick, chapter 5:
      The dinghy was trailing astern at the end of its painter, and Merrion looked at it as he passed. He saw that it was a battered-looking affair of the prahm type, with a blunt snout, and like the parent ship, had recently been painted a vivid green.
    1. A parent company. [from 20th c.]
      • 2013 June 22, “T time”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8841, page 68:
        The ability to shift profits to low-tax countries by locating intellectual property in them [] is often assumed to be the preserve of high-tech companies. [] current tax rules make it easy for all sorts of firms to generate [] “stateless income”: profit subject to tax in a jurisdiction that is neither the location of the factors of production that generate the income nor where the parent firm is domiciled.
  9. (computing) The object from which a child or derived object is descended; a node superior to another node. [from 20th c.]
    Synonym: mother
    Antonym: child

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

parent (third-person singular simple present parents, present participle parenting, simple past and past participle parented)

  1. To act as parent, to raise or rear.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “parent” in John A. Simpson and Edmund S. C. Weiner, editors, The Compact Oxford English Dictionary, volume II (P–Z, Supplement and Bibliography), 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, [1989] 1991, →ISBN, page 1274.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan parent, from Latin parentem, accusative singular of parēns.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

parent m (plural parents, feminine parenta)

  1. relative (someone in the same family)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French parent, from Old French parent, from Latin parentem, accusative singular of parēns.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

parent m (plural parents, feminine parente)

  1. relative, relation, family member
    • 1862, Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, I.1.iv:
      Une de ses parentes éloignées, madame la comtesse de Lô, laissait rarement échapper une occasion d'énumérer en sa présence ce qu'elle appelait «les espérances» de ses trois fils.
      One of his distant relatives, the countess of Lô, rarely missed an opportunity to list, in his presence, what she called her "hopes" for her three sons.
  2. (Louisiana, singular) parent
  3. (in the plural) ancestors
  4. (in the plural) parents
Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

parent (feminine singular parente, masculine plural parents, feminine plural parentes)

  1. related
  2. similar
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

parent

  1. third-person plural present indicative of parer
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of parer

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Verb 1Edit

parent

  1. third-person plural present active subjunctive of parō

Verb 2Edit

parent

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of pareō

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French parent.

NounEdit

parent m (plural parens)

  1. parent

DescendantsEdit

  • French: parent

NormanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French parent, from Latin parēns, parentem, from pariō, parere (bring forth, give birth to, produce).

NounEdit

parent m (plural parents)

  1. (Guernsey) parent
    Hyponyms: mère, père

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin parēns, parentem.

NounEdit

parent m (oblique plural parenz or parentz, nominative singular parenz or parentz, nominative plural parent)

  1. parent

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit