KoreanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Korean 들〮다〮 (túltá), from Old Korean 入乙 (*TUr-), the final rhotic also confirmed by linguistic reconstruction of Proto-Korean. In this case, Old Korean and Proto-Korean are probably the identical language.

In Hangul form: First attested in the Yongbi eocheonga (龍飛御天歌 / 용비어천가), 1447, as Middle Korean 들〮다〮 (Yale: túltá).

All meanings are related (often via metaphor) to the primary meaning of "to enter".

PronunciationEdit

Revised Romanization? deulda
Revised Romanization (translit.)? deulda
McCune–Reischauer? tŭlda
Yale Romanization? tulta
Audio
(file)

VerbEdit

들다 (deulda) (infinitive 들어, sequential 드니)

  1. (intransitive, both literal and figurative) to come in; to go in; to get in; to enter
    Synonyms: 들어오다 (deureooda, to come in), 들어가다 (deureogada, to go in)
  2. (intransitive, of light, water, etc.) to enter, to penetrate
    Synonym: 들어오다 (deureooda, to come in)
  3. (intransitive) to enter a road, a path
    • 왼쪽 들면 거야.
      Oenjjok gillo deulmyeon doel geoya.
      It should be fine once you go into the left street.
  4. (intransitive, with the cost as subject) to cost
  5. (intransitive, of water, color, atmosphere, etc.) to permeate in, to saturate
    • 들다
      gani deulda
      to be spiced
    • 미국 들다
      migungmuri deulda
      to be permeated with bad American influence
  6. (intransitive) to be included in
    • 계약서 들어 있습니다.
      Gyeyakseo-e deureo itseumnida.
      It's included in the contract.
    • 일등급 들다
      ildeunggeube deulda
      to be in the highest rank of the Korean grading system
  7. (intransitive, idiomatic) to be pleasing (with 마음 (ma-eum, “mind”), (nun, “eye”) as indirect objects)
  8. (intransitive, of an event, especially weather-related) to occur
    • 흉년 들었다
      hyungnyeoni deureotda
      A year of harvest failure occurred
  9. (transitive or intransitive) to join an organization, to enter into a contract
    • 보험 들었어.
      Boheomeul deureosseo.
      I signed up for insurance.
  10. (transitive) to side with
  11. (auxiliary, often negative) to insist on doing, to strive (after connective suffix (go))
  12. (intransitive) Various idiomatic usages with different types of subjects:
    1. (with subject relating to thought) to think
      • 이상한 생각 든다
        isanghan saenggagi deunda
        I get this weird thought (literally, the weird thought enters)
    2. (with subjects relating to disease) to contract, to get
    3. (with subjects relating to sleep) to fall asleep
      • 낮잠 들다
        natjami deulda
        to fall into a nap (literally, the nap enters)
    4. (with subject relating to habits) to get the habit
    5. (with subject relating to taste) to get the taste
      • 신맛 들다
        sinmasi deulda
        to get sour (literally, the sour taste enters)
    6. (with subject 나이 (nai, “age”)) to grow older
      • 나이 들다
        naiga deulda
        to grow older (literally, the age enters)
    7. (euphemistic, with subject relating to a child) to get pregnant
    8. (with subject (nal, “day”)) to stop raining, for the day to clear
    9. (with subject (ttam, “sweat”)) to stop sweating
    10. (with a subject relating to a blade) to be sharp, to cut well

ConjugationEdit

Etymology 2Edit

First attested in the Seokbo sangjeol (釋譜詳節 / 석보상절), 1447, as Middle Korean 들다〮 (Yale: tùltá), from Proto-Korean *tu(N)l(u)-.

PronunciationEdit

Revised Romanization? deulda
Revised Romanization (translit.)? deulda
McCune–Reischauer? tŭlda
Yale Romanization? tulta
Audio
(file)

VerbEdit

들다 (deulda) (infinitive 들어, sequential 드니)

  1. (transitive) to hold
    들다
    kareul deulda
    to hold a sword
  2. (transitive) to raise, lift up
    들다
    soneul deulda
    to raise your hand
    나무 들다
    namureul deulda
    to lift up a tree
    Synonym: 올리다 (ollida)
  3. (transitive, by extension) to offer proof, arguments], etc
  4. (transitive, honorific, suppletive) Honorific form of 먹다 (meokda, to eat, to drink)
    할아버지, 저녁 드세요!
    Harabeoji, jeonyeok deuseyo!
    Grandpa, come out and have dinner!

ConjugationEdit