See also: -예
U+C608, 예
HANGUL SYLLABLE YE
Composition: +
Dubeolsik input:d-P

[U+C607]
Hangul Syllables
[U+C609]




여 ←→ 오

KoreanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Not attested in Middle Korean. Probably from the same source as (ne), plausibly *녜 (*nye) (not directly attested).

PronunciationEdit

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [je̞(ː)]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ye
McCune–Reischauer?ye
Yale Romanization?yēy

InterjectionEdit

(ye)

  1. (formal) yes (affirms the truth of the question as stated)
    보셨습니까? — , 있습니다.
    Han beon-eun ga-bosyeotseumnikka? - ye, ga-bon jeok itseumnida.
    Have you been there at least once? — Yes, I have been there.
    없습니까? — , 없습니다.
    Han beon-do ga-bon jeok eopseumnikka? - ye, eopseumnida.
    Have you never been there? — No [lit. Yes], never.
Usage notesEdit
  • Korean has a number of words for "yes". (ye) is highly polite and formal (appropriate in an interview), (ne) is polite but less formal (appropriate in a conversation with parents), and (eung) and (eo) are plain and non-formal (appropriate in a conversation with friends).
  • As in the example above, Korean "yes" follows the polarity of the question, unlike in English. Hence saying "yes" to a negatively stated question means that the negative is true.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Sino-Korean word from (example), from the Middle Korean reading 례〯 (Yale: lyěy).

PronunciationEdit

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [je̞(ː)]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ye
McCune–Reischauer?ye
Yale Romanization?yēy

NounEdit

South Korean
Standard Language
예(例) (ye)
North Korean
Standard Language
례(例) (rye)

(ye) (hanja )

  1. example
    Synonyms: 사례(事例) (sarye), 예시(例示) (yesi), 일례(一例) (illye)
    들자, 일주일 5kg 감량하는 현실적이지 않습니다.
    Ye-reul deulja-myeon, ilju'ir-e okillogeuraem-eul gamnyanghaneun geos-eun hyeonsiljeog-iji anseumnida.
    To give an example, losing 5 kilograms in a week is not a realistic goal.
Usage notesEdit
  • This is often formatted as "예)" in textbooks and literature.
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit
  • 본보기 (bonbogi, good example, example for others)

Etymology 3Edit

Sino-Korean word from (ritual, etiquette), from the Middle Korean reading 례〮 (Yale: lyéy), (Yale: nyey).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ye
McCune–Reischauer?ye
Yale Romanization?yey

NounEdit

South Korean
Standard Language
예(禮) (ye)
North Korean
Standard Language
례(禮) (rye)

(ye) (hanja )

  1. (especially Confucianism) decorum, ceremonial (code of decorous behavior that all people ought to follow)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

First attested in the Yongbi eocheonga (龍飛御天歌 / 용비어천가), 1447, as Middle Korean 녜〯 (Yale: nyěy).

PronunciationEdit

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [je̞(ː)]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ye
McCune–Reischauer?ye
Yale Romanization?yēy

NounEdit

(ye)

  1. (in idiomatic expressions) ancient times, antiquity, old times
    부터 우리나라 동방예의지국으로 알려져왔다.
    Ye-ro-buteo urinara-neun dongbang'yeuijigug-euro allyeojeo-watda.
    Since ancient times, Korea has been known as the "eastern land of decorum".
    Synonym: (much more common) 옛날 (yennal)
Usage notesEdit
  • Now used primarily in the following expressions:
    • 지금이나ye-na jigeum-inawhether in old times or nowadays
    • 부터ye-ro-buteosince ancient times
Related termsEdit
  • (yet, old)

Etymology 5Edit

First attested in the Seokbo sangjeol (釋譜詳節 / 석보상절), 1447, as Middle Korean 이ᅌᅦ (Yale: ìngèy), equivalent to a contraction of modern 여기 (yeogi, here).

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ye
McCune–Reischauer?ye
Yale Romanization?yey

PronounEdit

(ye)

  1. (dated or dialectal) here
    어디라고 감히 찾아와!
    Ye-ga eodi-rago gamhi chaja-wa!
    Where do you think this is, that you dare to show up!
    • 1795, 李洙 (I Su) [Lee, Soo] et al., chapter 111, in 重刊老乞大諺解 (Junggan Nogeoldae Eonhae) [Reprinted Nogeoldae, with Korean Interpretation], volume 2:
      두어 ᄃᆞᆯ []
      ye isyeo dueo dal []
      being here for several months []

Etymology 6Edit

Sino-Korean word from .

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ye
McCune–Reischauer?ye
Yale Romanization?yey

Proper nounEdit

(Ye) (hanja )

  1. an ancient tribe living in Korea in the early first millennium
    Hypernym: 예맥(濊貊) (yemaek)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 7Edit

Sino-Korean word from 羿.

PronunciationEdit

Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ye
McCune–Reischauer?ye
Yale Romanization?yey

Proper nounEdit

(Ye) (hanja 羿)

  1. Hou Yi, a legendary archer in Chinese mythology
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 8Edit

In the Hangul script, first attested in the Yongbi eocheonga (龍飛御天歌 / 용비어천가), 1447, as Middle Korean 예〯 (Yale: Yěy), from Old Korean 倭理 (*YEri, Japanese). This is among the only native (non-Sino-Korean) Korean terms for ethnic groups that survive in the written record.

In the Early Modern era, the hanja (ye, literally filthy, obscene) was sometimes assigned to this word, either pejoratively or out of a genuine misunderstanding that this was the origin of the word.

PronunciationEdit

  • (SK Standard/Seoul) IPA(key): [je̞(ː)]
  • Phonetic hangul: [(ː)]
    • Though still prescriptive in Standard Korean, most speakers in both Koreas no longer distinguish vowel length.
Romanizations
Revised Romanization?ye
Revised Romanization (translit.)?ye
McCune–Reischauer?ye
Yale Romanization?yēy

NounEdit

(ye) (hanja )

  1. (obsolete, Early Modern) Japanese [until 1930s in some dialects]
    Synonyms: 왜인(倭人) (waein), 일본인(日本人) (ilbonin)
Usage notesEdit
  • Though already being replaced by the Sino-Korean terms 왜(倭) (wae) and 일본(日本) (ilbon) in the eighteenth century, the word persisted into the 1930s in the Jeolla dialect according to the field research of colonial linguist Shinpei Ogura, although even there it had come to be reserved for idiomatic expressions.

Etymology 9Edit

Modern Korean reading of various Chinese characters, from the Middle Korean reading (Yale: yey).

SyllableEdit

(ye)

Extended content
  1. : beforehand
    (eumhun reading: 미리 (miri ye))
    (MC reading: (MC jɨʌH))
  2. : entrust
    (eumhun reading: 맡길 (matgil ye))
    (MC reading: (MC jɨʌH))
  3. : skill
    (eumhun reading: 재주 (jaeju ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋiᴇiH))
  4. : praise
    (eumhun reading: 기릴 (giril ye))
    (MC reading: (MC jɨʌ, jɨʌH))
  5. : sharp
    (eumhun reading: 날카로울 (nalkaroul ye))
    (MC reading: (MC jiuᴇiH, duɑiH))
  6. : servant (in e.g. 노예(奴隸) (noye, slave))
    (eumhun reading: (jong ye))
    (MC reading: (MC leiH))
  7. : used as a surname
    (eumhun reading: 성씨 (seongssi ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiuᴇiH))
  8. : attain
    (eumhun reading: 이를 (ireul ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋeiH))
  9. : descendant, heir
    (eumhun reading: 후손 (huson ye))
    (MC reading: (MC jiᴇiH))
  10. : cut
    (eumhun reading: (bel ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋɨɐiH))
  11. : wisdom
    (eumhun reading: 슬기 (seulgi ye))
    (MC reading: (MC jiuᴇiH))
  12. : drag
    (eumhun reading: (kkeul ye))
    (MC reading: (MC jiᴇiH))
  13. : bright, clever
    (eumhun reading: 밝을 (balgeul ye))
    (MC reading: (MC jiuᴇiH))
  14. : child
    (eumhun reading: 어린이 (eorini ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋei))
  15. : vast and deep
    (eumhun reading: 깊고 넓은 (gipgo neolbeun ye))
    (MC reading: (MC huɑiH, ʔuɑiH, ʔʉɐiH, huɑt̚))
  16. : rainbow
    (eumhun reading: 무지개 (mujigae ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋei, ŋeiH, ŋet̚))
  17. : lion
    (eumhun reading: 사자 (saja ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋei))
  18. : stamen
    (eumhun reading: 꽃술 (kkotsul ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiuᴇX))
  19. : river bend
    (eumhun reading: 물굽이 (mulgubi ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiuᴇiH))
  20. : punish
    (eumhun reading: 징계할 (jinggyehal ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋɨɐiH))
  21. : filthy
    (eumhun reading: 더러울 (deoreoul ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔʉɐiH))
  22. : somniloquy
    (eumhun reading: 잠꼬대 (jamkkodae ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋiᴇiH))
  23. : newborn
    (eumhun reading: 갓난아이 (gannanai ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔei))
  24. : Alternative form of
    (MC reading: )
  25. : compare
    (eumhun reading: 비길 (bigil ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ɳˠɛ, ŋeiX))
  26. : tool handle
    (eumhun reading: 장부 (jangbu ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiuᴇiH))
  27. : an ancient tribe
    (eumhun reading: 민족 이름 (minjok ireum ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔʉɐiH))
  28. : look askance
    (eumhun reading: 흘겨볼 (heulgyeobol ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋeiH))
  29. : cataract in the eye
    (eumhun reading: 백태 (baektae kkil ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔeiH))
  30. : spear handle
    (eumhun reading: 전대 (changjeondae ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔei, ʔeiH))
  31. : cover from the sun, shade
    (eumhun reading: 일산 (ilsan ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔei, ʔeiH))
  32. : Alternative form of
    (MC reading: )
  33. : Alternative form of
    (MC reading: (MC ȵiuᴇX, ȵiuɪX))
  34. : Alternative form of
    (MC reading: )
  35. : coarse
    (eumhun reading: 거칠 (geochil ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔʉɐiH))
  36. : black fly
    (eumhun reading: 파리매 (parimae ye))
    (MC reading: )
  37. : Alternative form of
    (MC reading: (MC ŋei, ŋet̚))
  38. : salamander
    (eumhun reading: 도롱뇽 (dorongnyong ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ŋei))
  39. : seagull
    (eumhun reading: 갈매기 (galmaegi ye))
    (MC reading: (MC ʔei))

Etymology 10Edit

South Korean reading of various Chinese characters in isolation or as the first element of a compound, and also the reading in most dialects in 1945, excluding Pyongan and Yukjin, where they are pronounced in this position as (ne) in Pyongan or as (nye) in Yukjin.

From Middle Korean (Yale: lyey). When preceded by another character in a compound, they retain the original (rye) form.

In the North Korean standard, they are always read as (rye), but this is an artificial imposition intended to standardize Sino-Korean readings, which did not reflect any major dialect's pronunciation in 1945.

SyllableEdit

(ye)

Extended content
  1. : law, example
    (eumhun reading: 법식 (beopsik ye))
    (MC reading: (MC liᴇiH))
  2. : etiquette, decorum
    (eumhun reading: 예절 (yejeol ye))
    (MC reading: (MC leiX))
  3. : servant
    (eumhun reading: (jong ye))
    (MC reading: (MC leiH))
  4. : rice drink
    (eumhun reading: 단술 (dansul ye))
    (MC reading: (MC leiX))
  5. : name of a Chinese river
    (eumhun reading: 이름 (gang ireum ye))
    (MC reading: (MC leiX))
  6. : servant
    (eumhun reading: (jong ye))
    (MC reading: (MC leiH))
  7. : snakehead
    (eumhun reading: 가물치 (gamulchi ye))
    (MC reading: (MC leiX))



Middle KoreanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Korean 倭理 (*YEri, Japanese), today replaced by Sino-Korean terms in all modern dialects.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

예〯 (Yěy)

  1. the Japanese
    • 1447, “Stanza 52”, in 龍飛御天歌 / 용비어천가 [Yongbi eocheon'ga]:
      (쳐ᇰ)으〮로〮 온 예〯와〮 싸호〮샤〮 투〮구〮 아니〮 밧기〮시면〮 나랏〮 ()()을〮 사ᄅᆞ시〮리〮ᅌᅵᆺ가〮
      CHYENG-úlwó wòn Yěy-Gwoá ssàhwósyá thwúkwú àní pàskísìmyén nàlá-s SYWO.MIN-úl sàlòsílíngìská
      If [he] had not been called to combat the hundreds of Japanese and not removed the helmet [of the Japanese general], would he have saved the poor people [of Korea]?

DescendantsEdit

  • Early Modern Korean: (Ye, Japanese)

See alsoEdit