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CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hac f (plural hacs)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter H.

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Feminine ablative singular of hic (this).

AdverbEdit

hāc (not comparable)

  1. this way
  2. so, thus, thusly

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

PronounEdit

hāc

  1. ablative feminine singular of hic

ReferencesEdit

  • hac in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • hac in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • hac in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) in our time; in our days: his temporibus, nostra (hac) aetate, nostra memoria, his (not nostris) diebus
    • (ambiguous) to enjoy the privilege of living; to be alive: vita or hac luce frui
    • (ambiguous) (great) advantage accrues to me from this: fructus ex hac re redundant in or ad me
    • (ambiguous) I think that..: in hac sum sententia, ut...putem
    • (ambiguous) all agree on this point: omnes (uno ore) in hac re consentiunt
    • (ambiguous) when corn is as dear as it is: hac annona (Plaut. Trin. 2. 4. 83)
    • (ambiguous) I have a few words to say on this: mihi quaedam dicenda sunt de hac re

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ottoman Turkish حج(hac), from Arabic حَجّ(ḥajj, pilgrimage), from حَجَّ(ḥajja, to overcome).

NounEdit

hac (definite accusative hacı, plural haclar)

  1. hajj, haj, hadj

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative hac
Definite accusative hacı
Singular Plural
Nominative hac haclar
Definite accusative hacı hacları
Dative haca haclara
Locative hacda haclarda
Ablative hacdan haclardan
Genitive hacın hacların