See also: Baro, barò, baró, báró, baro-, and båro

Angloromani edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbaːrəʊ], [ˈbaɹəʊ]

Adjective edit

baro

  1. big
  2. great
Descendants edit
  • English: barry

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Romani bero.

Noun edit

baro

  1. boat

References edit

  • “baro”, in Angloromani Dictionary[1], The Manchester Romani Project, 2004-2006, page 17
  • “baro”, in Angloromani Dictionary[2], The Manchester Romani Project, 2004-2006, page 20

Asi edit

Noun edit

barò

  1. clothes

Balkan Romani edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Adjective edit

baro

  1. (Bugurdži, Crimea, Kosovo Arli, Macedonian Arli, Sepečides, Sofia Erli, Ursari) big
  2. (Bugurdži, Kosovo Arli, Sofia Erli, Ursari) great
  3. (Bugurdži, Kosovo Arli, Sofia Erli, Ursari) large
  4. (Bugurdži, Kosovo Arli) huge
  5. (Crimea) eldest
  6. (Macedonian Arli) mature
  7. (Sepečides, Sofia Erli) mighty
  8. (Sofia Erli) swollen
  9. (Sofia Erli) grown-up
  10. (Ursari) numerous
  11. (Ursari) solid
  12. (Ursari) full-bosomed

Noun edit

baro m

  1. (Bugurdži, Macedonian Arli) adult, grown-up
  2. (Crimea) chief
  3. (Crimea) policeman
  4. (Sofia Erli) director

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • baro” in Bugurdži Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Crimean Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Kosovo Arli Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Macedonian Arli Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Sepečides Romani-English dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Sofia Erli Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Ursari Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Baltic Romani edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Adjective edit

baro

  1. (Lithuania, North Russia) big, great
  2. (Lithuania) large

Noun edit

baro m

  1. (North Russia) adult

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • baro” in Lithuanian Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in North Russian Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Carpathian Romani edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Adjective edit

baro

  1. (Burgenland, East Slovakia, Gurvari, Hungarian Vend, Romungro) big
  2. (Burgenland) large
  3. (Burgenland) huge
  4. (Burgenland) mighty
  5. (Burgenland, Gurvari, Hungarian Vend, Romungro) great
  6. (East Slovakia) high
  7. (East Slovakia) elevated, noble
  8. (East Slovakia) important

Adverb edit

baro

  1. (East Slovakia) very, many
  2. (East Slovakia) long

Noun edit

baro m

  1. (Burgenland) adult
  2. (East Slovakia) commander
  3. (East Slovakia) important/serious business

References edit

  • baro” in Burgenland Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in East Slovak Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Gurvari Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Hungarian Vend Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Romungro Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Cebuano edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧ro

Noun edit

baro

  1. a cylindrical container with a capacity of about 5 to 6 gallons

Erromintxela edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Adjective edit

baro

  1. large, big

References edit

  • baro” in Alexandre Baudrimont, Vocabulaire de la langue des Bohémiens habitant les pays basques français, Bordeaux: G. Gounouilhou, 1862, →OCLC, page 38.

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

bari +‎ -o

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbaro]
  • Audio:
    (file)
  • Rhymes: -aro
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ro

Noun edit

baro (accusative singular baron, plural baroj, accusative plural barojn)

  1. obstruction, barrier ("that which obstructs or impedes")
    E. forigas la lingvajn barojn inter la popoloj.Esperanto removes the language barriers between peoples.
    Pro multaj ĝenoj k baroj la laboro haltis.Work has halted due to many annoyances and barriers.
  2. (mathematics) bound

Ido edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Esperanto baro.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

baro (plural bari)

  1. obstruction (barrier)

Derived terms edit

Ilocano edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(ma-)baqəʀu, from Proto-Austronesian *(ma-)baqəʀuh.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /baˈɾo/, [bɐˈɾo]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ro

Adjective edit

baró (Kur-itan spelling ᜊᜎᜓ)

  1. new (most senses)

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈba.ro/
  • Rhymes: -aro
  • Hyphenation: bà‧ro

Etymology 1 edit

Probably from Latin bārō (simpleton). Or, from Late Latin baraliāre (dispute, quarrel), probably from a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia. Cognate with Spanish barajar and Catalan baralla (deck of cards), Portuguese baralhar (to shuffle cards).

Noun edit

baro m (plural bari)

  1. cardsharp
  2. cheat
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb edit

baro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of barare

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Jamaican Creole edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑːrʌ/, /ˈbɑːra/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ro

Verb edit

baro

  1. Alternative form of borrow
    • 2020, Carolyn Cooper, “Govament a hide up di truth bout di virus?”, in The Jamaica Gleaner[3]:
      “Mad smadi a baro maask! []
      Crazy people are borrowing masks! []

Kalo Finnish Romani edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Adjective edit

baro (feminine bari, comparative baaride)

  1. big, great
  2. grown-up

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • baro” in Finnish Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Karao edit

Noun edit

baro

  1. clothes; dress

Kashubian edit

Adverb edit

baro (comparative barżi, superlative nôbarżi)

  1. very; very much

Further reading edit

  • baro”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022
  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011) “bardzo”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi[4]

Latin edit

Etymology 1 edit

Unknown, likely a loanword. Cf. bardus (stupid).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

bārō m (genitive bārōnis); third declension

  1. simpleton, dunce, lout (a boorish and uneducated person)
Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bārō bārōnēs
Genitive bārōnis bārōnum
Dative bārōnī bārōnibus
Accusative bārōnem bārōnēs
Ablative bārōne bārōnibus
Vocative bārō bārōnēs
Related terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *barō, although a Celtic origin has also been proposed. See baron for more. Possibly attested as early as AD 97–105.[1]

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈba.roː/, [ˈbäroː]
  • (modern Italianate Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈba.ro/, [ˈbäːro]
  • The length of the first vowel is uncertain. Scholars generally give it as short per the Germanic and to distinguish from etymology 1. Nevertheless it does appear with a long vowel in medieval verse (e.g. in De triumphis ecclesie).

Noun edit

barō m (genitive barōnis); third declension

  1. (Classical Latin) man
    • AD 150–275, Curse-tablet from Britain Brit. 23.5:
      ut ei qui mihi fraudem fecerit sanitatem ei non permittas nec iacere nec sedere nec bibere nec manducare si baro si mulier si puer si puella si servus si liber[2]
      ...[I ask] that you not allow the one who has committed a crime against me to have good health, nor to lie, sit, drink, or eat, whether [they be] a man or woman, boy or girl, slave or freeman...
    • Ca. AD 500, Lex Salica 31.1–2:
      si quis baronem ingenuum de via sua ostaverit aut inpinxerit [...] dc dinarios qui faciunt solidos xv culpabilis iudicetur si quis mulierem ingenuam de via ostaveritaut inpinxerit mdccc dinarios qui faciunt solidos xlv culpabilis iudicetur[3]
      Should anyone shove a freeborn man out of their way [...] they shall be fined 600 denarii, which amounts to 15 solidi. Should anyone shove a freeborn woman out of their way, they shall be fined 1800 denarii, which amounts to 45 solidi.
  2. (Late Latin) mercenary
    • AD 600–625, Isidore's Etymologiae 9.4.31:
      mercennarii sunt qui serviunt accepta mercede idem et barones graeco nomine quod sint fortes in laboribus βαρύς enim dicitur gravis quod est fortis cui contrarius est levis id est infirmus[4]
      Mercenaries are those who serve for money. They are also known by the Greek name barones since they are powerful in their exertions. After all, βαρύς means 'heavy' i.e. 'strong', the opposite of which is 'light' i.e. 'weak'.
  3. (Late Latin, Early Medieval Latin)? soldier's servant
    • Probably 4th–9th c. AD, Commentum Cornuti 5.138:
      lingua gallorum barones vel varones dicuntur servi militum[5]
      In the parlance of the Gauls, the servants of soldiers are called barones or varones.
  4. (Early Medieval Latin) freeman?
    • AD 643, Edictum Rothari 1.17:
      si quis ex baronibus nostris ad nos voluerit venire securus veniat[6]
      Should any of our barones[?] wish to come to us, let him do so safely...
  5. (Early Medieval Latin) serf
    • AD 741, Deed of donation in St. Gallen :
      et in insola ipsa mancipios tres et parones quattuor ista omnia ad ipsum monasterium superius nominatum tradimus[7]
      ...as well as three slaves and four serfs on the island. We donate all this to the aforementioned monastery...
  6. (Medieval Latin, in the plural) the notables (of a kingdom, country, or city)
  7. (Medieval Latin) vassal
  8. (Medieval Latin) baron
  9. (Medieval Latin) famous man
Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative barō barōnēs
Genitive barōnis barōnum
Dative barōnī barōnibus
Accusative barōnem barōnēs
Ablative barōne barōnibus
Vocative barō barōnēs
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

References edit

  1. ^ https://romaninscriptionsofbritain.org/inscriptions/TabVindol713
  2. ^ https://romaninscriptionsofbritain.org/inscriptions/Brit.23.5
  3. ^ https://la.wikisource.org/wiki/Pagina:Lex_Salica_(1906).pdf/45
  4. ^ https://www.thelatinlibrary.com/isidore/9.shtml
  5. ^ Zetzel, James E. G. 2005. Marginal scholarship and textual deviance: The Commentum Cornuti and early scholia on Persius. BICS supplement 84. London: Institute of Classical Studies. Page 173.
  6. ^ baro in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  7. ^ https://werkstatt.formulae.uni-hamburg.de/texts/urn:cts:formulae:stgallen.wartmann0007.lat001/passage/all

Further reading edit

  • baro”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • baro”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • baro in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • baro in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • baro in Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften (1967– ) Mittellateinisches Wörterbuch, Munich: C.H. Beck
  • Liberman, Anatoly (2014 June 18) “A globalized history of “baron,” part 2”, in OUPblog, retrieved 2021-03-29

Latvian edit

Verb edit

baro

  1. inflection of barot:
    1. second/third-person singular present indicative
    2. third-person plural present indicative
    3. second-person singular imperative
  2. (with the particle lai) third-person singular imperative of barot
  3. (with the particle lai) third-person plural imperative of barot

Lithuanian edit

Noun edit

baro m

  1. genitive singular of baras

Mansaka edit

Noun edit

baro

  1. widowed person

Old High German edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *baru, from Proto-Germanic *barwaz.

Noun edit

baro m

  1. sanctuary
  2. place of sacrifice

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *barō, from Proto-Germanic *barô.

Noun edit

baro m

  1. human being
  2. man
  3. freeman

Romani edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Sauraseni Prakrit 𑀯𑀟𑁆𑀟 (vaḍḍa), from Sanskrit वड्र (vaḍra), from वृद्ध (vṛddha, large, old, eminent).

Adjective edit

baro (feminine bari, plural bare)

  1. big
    Antonym: tikno

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018) “baro”, in ニューエクスプレス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, →ISBN, page 134
  • baro” in Dolenjski Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Serbo-Croatian edit

Noun edit

baro (Cyrillic spelling баро)

  1. vocative singular of bȁra

Sinte Romani edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Adjective edit

baro (feminine bari)

  1. big
  2. wide
  3. long
  4. tall
  5. important

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • baro” in Sinte Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Somali edit

Verb edit

baro

  1. learn
    Synonym: bar

Tagalog edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Malay baju (cf. Ilocano bado, Remontado Agta badu), ultimately from Classical Persian بازو (bāzū, upper arm).

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧ro
  • IPA(key): /ˈbaɾoʔ/, [ˈba.ɾoʔ]

Noun edit

barò (Baybayin spelling ᜊᜇᜓ)

  1. clothing; wearing apparel
  2. upper garment

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • Zorc, David Paul (1977) The Bisayan Dialects of the Philippines: Subgrouping and Reconstruction (Pacific Linguistics, Series C, No. 44)‎[6], Canberra: Research School of Pacific Studies, Australian National University, page 213.
  • Potet, Jean-Paul G. (2016) Tagalog Borrowings and Cognates, Lulu Press, →ISBN, page 60

Ternate edit

Etymology edit

From N- (nominalizer) +‎ paro (to cover).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

baro

  1. a bandage

References edit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Traveller Norwegian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Adjective edit

baro

  1. large, big

References edit

  • baro” in Norwegian Romani Dictionary.
  • baro” in Tavringens Rakripa: Romanifolkets Ordbok, Landsorganisasjonen for Romanifolket.

Vlax Romani edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Adjective edit

baro (feminine bari)

  1. (Banatiski Gurbet, Gurbet, Kalderaš, Lovara, Macedonian Džambazi, Sremski Gurbet) big, large
  2. (Banatiski Gurbet, Lovara, Macedonian Džambazi, Sremski Gurbet) great
  3. (Banatiski Gurbet, Gurbet, Sremski Gurbet) long
  4. (Banatiski Gurbet, Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi, Sremski Gurbet) high
  5. (Banatiski Gurbet, Sremski Gurbet) huge
  6. (Banatiski Gurbet, Gurbet, Lovara, Macedonian Džambazi, Sremski Gurbet) tall
  7. (Gurbet) fat
  8. (Gurbet, Sremski Gurbet) wide
  9. (Gurbet) grown-up, adult
  10. (Gurbet, figuratively) important
  11. (Gurbet) prominent
  12. (Gurbet) main
  13. (Gurbet, Kalderaš) respectable
  14. (Gurbet) esteemed
  15. (Gurbet, Kalderaš, Lovara) powerful
  16. (Gurbet, Kalderaš) mighty
  17. (Kalderaš) elder
  18. (Lovara) noble
  19. (Sremski Gurbet) broad
Derived terms edit

Adverb edit

baro

  1. (Gurbet) very, very much

Noun edit

baro m

  1. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) lord
  2. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) any important, respectable person: landlord, master, chief, director, manager, commander, employer
  3. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) householder
  4. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) rich man
  5. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) sovereign
  6. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) prince
  7. (Kalderaš) chief
  8. (Kalderaš) general
  9. (Macedonian Džambazi) Mr.

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

baro m

  1. (Lovara) bar
Derived terms edit

References edit

  • baro” in Banatiski Gurbet Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Gurbet Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Kalderaš Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Lovara Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Macedonian Džambazi Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Sremski Gurbet Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.