See also: Baro, barò, baró, báró, baro-, and båro

AngloromaniEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbaːrəʊ], [ˈbaɹəʊ]

AdjectiveEdit

baro

  1. big
  2. great
DescendantsEdit
  • English: barry

Etymology 2Edit

Inherited from Romani bero.

NounEdit

baro

  1. boat

ReferencesEdit

  • baro”, in Angloromani Dictionary, The Manchester Romani Project, 2004-2006, page 17
  • baro”, in Angloromani Dictionary, The Manchester Romani Project, 2004-2006, page 20

AsiEdit

NounEdit

barò

  1. clothes

Balkan RomaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Romani baro.

AdjectiveEdit

baro

  1. (Bugurdži, Crimea, Kosovo Arli, Macedonian Arli, Sepečides, Sofia Erli, Ursari) big
  2. (Bugurdži, Kosovo Arli, Sofia Erli, Ursari) great
  3. (Bugurdži, Kosovo Arli, Sofia Erli, Ursari) large
  4. (Bugurdži, Kosovo Arli) huge
  5. (Crimea) eldest
  6. (Macedonian Arli) mature
  7. (Sepečides, Sofia Erli) mighty
  8. (Sofia Erli) swollen
  9. (Sofia Erli) grown-up
  10. (Ursari) numerous
  11. (Ursari) solid
  12. (Ursari) full-bosomed

NounEdit

baro m

  1. (Bugurdži, Macedonian Arli) adult, grown-up
  2. (Crimea) chief
  3. (Crimea) policeman
  4. (Sofia Erli) director

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • baro” in Bugurdži Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Crimean Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Kosovo Arli Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Macedonian Arli Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Sepečides Romani-English dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Sofia Erli Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Ursari Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Baltic RomaniEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Romani baro.

AdjectiveEdit

baro

  1. (Lithuania, North Russia) big, great
  2. (Lithuania) large

NounEdit

baro m

  1. (North Russia) adult

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • baro” in Lithuanian Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in North Russian Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Carpathian RomaniEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Romani baro.

AdjectiveEdit

baro

  1. (Burgenland, East Slovakia, Gurvari, Hungarian Vend, Romungro) big
  2. (Burgenland) large
  3. (Burgenland) huge
  4. (Burgenland) mighty
  5. (Burgenland, Gurvari, Hungarian Vend, Romungro) great
  6. (East Slovakia) high
  7. (East Slovakia) elevated, noble
  8. (East Slovakia) important

AdverbEdit

baro

  1. (East Slovakia) very, many
  2. (East Slovakia) long

NounEdit

baro m

  1. (Burgenland) adult
  2. (East Slovakia) commander
  3. (East Slovakia) important/serious business

ReferencesEdit

  • baro” in Burgenland Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in East Slovak Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Gurvari Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Hungarian Vend Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Romungro Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

ErromintxelaEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Romani baro.

AdjectiveEdit

baro

  1. large, big

ReferencesEdit

  • baro” in Alexandre Baudrimont, Vocabulaire de la langue des Bohémiens habitant les pays basques français, Bordeaux: G. Gounouilhou, 1862, →OCLC, page 40.

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

bari +‎ -o

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈbaro]
  • Audio:
    (file)
  • Rhymes: -aro
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ro

NounEdit

baro (accusative singular baron, plural baroj, accusative plural barojn)

  1. obstruction, barrier ("that which obstructs or impedes")
    E. forigas la lingvajn barojn inter la popoloj.Esperanto removes the language barriers between peoples.
    Pro multaj ĝenoj k baroj la laboro haltis.Work has halted due to many annoyances and barriers.
  2. (mathematics) bound

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Esperanto baro.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

baro (plural bari)

  1. obstruction (barrier)

Derived termsEdit


IlocanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(ma-)baqəʀu, from Proto-Austronesian *(ma-)baqəʀuh.

AdjectiveEdit

baro

  1. new (recently made or created)

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Latin bārō (simpleton). Or, from Late Latin baraliare (dispute, quarrel), probably from a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia. Cognate with Spanish barajar and Catalan baralla (deck of cards), Portuguese baralhar (to shuffle cards).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈba.ro/
  • Rhymes: -aro
  • Hyphenation: bà‧ro

NounEdit

baro m (plural bari)

  1. cardsharp
  2. cheat

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

baro

  1. first-person singular present indicative of barare

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Jamaican CreoleEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑːrʌ/, /ˈbɑːra/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧ro

VerbEdit

baro

  1. Alternative form of borrow.
    • 2020, Carolyn Cooper, “Govament a hide up di truth bout di virus?”, in The Jamaica Gleaner[1]:
      “Mad smadi a baro maask! []
      Crazy people are borrowing masks! []

Kalo Finnish RomaniEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Romani baro.

AdjectiveEdit

baro (feminine bari, comparative baaride)

  1. big, great
  2. grown-up

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • baro” in Finnish Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

KaraoEdit

NounEdit

baro

  1. clothes; dress

KashubianEdit

AdverbEdit

baro (comparative barżi, superlative nôbarżi)

  1. very; very much

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown, likely a loanword. Cf. bardus (stupid).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bārō m (genitive bārōnis); third declension

  1. simpleton, dunce, lout (a boorish and uneducated person)
    1. servant, slave
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bārō bārōnēs
Genitive bārōnis bārōnum
Dative bārōnī bārōnibus
Accusative bārōnem bārōnēs
Ablative bārōne bārōnibus
Vocative bārō bārōnēs
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Frankish *barō or another Germanic language. Meaning "baron" probably via Old French. More at varón, baron.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈbaː.roː/, [ˈbäːroː] or IPA(key): /ˈba.roː/, [ˈbäroː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈba.ro/, [ˈbäːro]
  • Note: albeit the vowel of this word is commonly given as short (based on etymology and/or for disambiguation), it appears with a long vowel in medieval verse when used in the meaning "baron" (e.g. in De triumphis ecclesie), while quantity in the meaning "man" of Late Latin is impossible to establish.

NounEdit

bā̆rō m (genitive bā̆rōnis); third declension

  1. (Late Latin) man, freeman
    1. mercenary
  2. (Medieval Latin) baron
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative bā̆rō bā̆rōnēs
Genitive bā̆rōnis bā̆rōnum
Dative bā̆rōnī bā̆rōnibus
Accusative bā̆rōnem bā̆rōnēs
Ablative bā̆rōne bā̆rōnibus
Vocative bā̆rō bā̆rōnēs
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • baro”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • baro”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • baro in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • baro in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Further readingEdit

Liberman, Anatoly (2014-06-18), “A globalized history of “baron,” part 2”, in OUPblog[2], retrieved 2021-03-29


LatvianEdit

VerbEdit

baro

  1. 2nd person singular present indicative form of barot
  2. 3rd person singular present indicative form of barot
  3. 3rd person plural present indicative form of barot
  4. 2nd person singular imperative form of barot
  5. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of barot
  6. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of barot

LithuanianEdit

NounEdit

baro m

  1. genitive singular of baras

MansakaEdit

NounEdit

baro

  1. widowed person

Old High GermanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *baru, from Proto-Germanic *barwaz.

NounEdit

baro m

  1. sanctuary
  2. place of sacrifice

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-West Germanic *barō, from Proto-Germanic *barô.

NounEdit

baro m

  1. human being
  2. man
  3. freeman

RomaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Sauraseni Prakrit 𑀯𑀟𑁆𑀟 (vaḍḍa), from Sanskrit वड्र (vaḍra), from वृद्ध (vṛddha, large, old, eminent).

AdjectiveEdit

baro (feminine bari, plural bare)

  1. big
    Antonym: tikno

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018), “baro”, in ニューエクスプレス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, →ISBN, page 134
  • baro” in Dolenjski Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

baro (Cyrillic spelling баро)

  1. vocative singular of bȁra

Sinte RomaniEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Romani baro.

AdjectiveEdit

baro (feminine bari)

  1. big
  2. wide
  3. long
  4. tall
  5. important

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • baro” in Sinte Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

SomaliEdit

VerbEdit

baro

  1. learn
    Synonym: bar

TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Malay baju (cf. Ilocano bado), ultimately from Persian بازو(bâzu, upper arm).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ba‧ro
  • IPA(key): /ˈbaɾoʔ/, [ˈbɐ.ɾoʔ]

NounEdit

barò

  1. clothing; wearing apparel
  2. upper garment

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • Zorc, David Paul (1977) The Bisayan Dialects of the Philippines: Subgrouping and Reconstruction (Pacific Linguistics, Series C, No. 44)‎[3], Canberra: Research School of Pacific Studies, Australian National University, page 213.
  • Potet, Jean-Paul G. (2016) Tagalog Borrowings and Cognates, Lulu Press, →ISBN, page 60

TernateEdit

EtymologyEdit

From N- (nominalizer) +‎ paro (to cover).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

baro

  1. a bandage

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh

Traveller NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Inherited from Romani baro.

AdjectiveEdit

baro

  1. large, big

ReferencesEdit

  • baro” in Norwegian Romani Dictionary.
  • baro” in Tavringens Rakripa: Romanifolkets Ordbok, Landsorganisasjonen for Romanifolket.

Vlax RomaniEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Romani baro.

AdjectiveEdit

baro (feminine bari)

  1. (Banatiski Gurbet, Gurbet, Kalderaš, Lovara, Macedonian Džambazi, Sremski Gurbet) big, large
  2. (Banatiski Gurbet, Lovara, Macedonian Džambazi, Sremski Gurbet) great
  3. (Banatiski Gurbet, Gurbet, Sremski Gurbet) long
  4. (Banatiski Gurbet, Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi, Sremski Gurbet) high
  5. (Banatiski Gurbet, Sremski Gurbet) huge
  6. (Banatiski Gurbet, Gurbet, Lovara, Macedonian Džambazi, Sremski Gurbet) tall
  7. (Gurbet) fat
  8. (Gurbet, Sremski Gurbet) wide
  9. (Gurbet) grown-up, adult
  10. (Gurbet, figuratively) important
  11. (Gurbet) prominent
  12. (Gurbet) main
  13. (Gurbet, Kalderaš) respectable
  14. (Gurbet) esteemed
  15. (Gurbet, Kalderaš, Lovara) powerful
  16. (Gurbet, Kalderaš) mighty
  17. (Kalderaš) elder
  18. (Lovara) noble
  19. (Sremski Gurbet) broad
Derived termsEdit

AdverbEdit

baro

  1. (Gurbet) very, very much

NounEdit

baro m

  1. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) lord
  2. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) any important, respectable person: landlord, master, chief, director, manager, commander, employer
  3. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) householder
  4. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) rich man
  5. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) sovereign
  6. (Gurbet, Macedonian Džambazi) prince
  7. (Kalderaš) chief
  8. (Kalderaš) general
  9. (Macedonian Džambazi) Mr.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

baro m

  1. (Lovara) bar
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • baro” in Banatiski Gurbet Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Gurbet Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Kalderaš Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Lovara Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Macedonian Džambazi Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.
  • baro” in Sremski Gurbet Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.