See also: Dale and dále

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /deɪl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪl

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dale, from Old English dæl, from Proto-Germanic *dalą. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Doal, Dutch dal, German Low German Daal, German Tal, Swedish dal, Danish dal, Norwegian dal, Icelandic dalur.[1]

NounEdit

dale (plural dales)

  1. (chiefly Britain) A valley, often in an otherwise hilly area.
    Synonyms: dell, dells, vale
    • 1797, S[amuel] T[aylor] Coleridge, “Kubla Khan: Or A Vision in a Dream”, in Christabel: Kubla Khan, a Vision: The Pains of Sleep, London: Printed for John Murray, [], by William Bulmer and Co. [], published 1816, OCLC 1380031, page 57:
      Five miles meandering with a mazy motion, / Through wood and dale the sacred river ran, / Then reached the caverns measureless to man, / And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean: [...]
    • 1869 May, Anthony Trollope, “The Clock House at Nuncombe Putney”, in He Knew He Was Right, volume I, London: Strahan and Company, publishers, [], OCLC 1118026626, page 113:
      The country about Nuncombe Putney is perhaps as pretty as any in England. It is beyond the river Teign, between that and Dartmoor, and is so lovely in all its variations of rivers, rivulets, broken ground, hills and dales, old broken, battered, time-worn timber, green knolls, rich pastures, and heathy common, that the wonder is that English lovers of scenery know so little of it.
    • 1908, Edmund Louis Gruber, The Caissons Go Rolling Along:
      Over hill, over dale / As we hit the dusty trail, / And those caissons go rolling along.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Related to Low German daal or Dutch daal (lowers, descends) and French dalle (trough; conduit). Attested in English since the seventeenth century.[2]

NounEdit

dale (plural dales)

  1. (archaic) A trough or spout to carry off water, as from a pump.
    • 1853, John Fincham, An Outline of Ship Building in Four Parts[1], page 40:
      The pump-dale scupper is that to which the dale leads, that conveys the water from the pumps to the side on the lower deck of large ships.

ReferencesEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for dale in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

See dal.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /daːlə/, [ˈd̥æːlə]

NounEdit

dale c

  1. indefinite plural of dal

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Low German dalen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /daːlə/, [ˈd̥æːlə]

VerbEdit

dale (imperative dal, infinitive at dale, present tense daler, past tense dalede, perfect tense har dalet)

  1. fall
  2. descend
  3. go down
  4. sink
  5. decrease
  6. fall off
  7. subside
  8. decline
AntonymsEdit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dale

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of dalen

AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

dale

  1. Romanization of 𐌳𐌰𐌻𐌴

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English dæl, from Proto-Germanic *dala-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /daːl/, /dɛːl/, /dal/

NounEdit

dale (plural dales)

  1. A dale or valley.
  2. (rare) A hole or barrow.

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: dale
  • Scots: dale, daal

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdale/, [ˈd̪ale]

VerbEdit

dale

  1. Compound of the informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of dar, da and the pronoun le.

InterjectionEdit

dale

  1. (Argentina) OK, okey dokey, right

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


VenetianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dale f

  1. feminine plural of dalo