See also: Mage, Magé, magë, and måge

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mages (pluralia tantum), from Latin magus. Doublet of magus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mage (plural magi or mages)

  1. (fantasy) A magician, wizard or sorcerer.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

mage

  1. plural of maag

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈmæːjə], [ˈmæːæ]

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse maki, from Proto-Germanic *makô, *gamakô, cognate with English match.

NounEdit

mage c (singular definite magen, plural indefinite mager)

  1. fellow (one of a pair, or of two things used together)
  2. mate (of an animal)
  3. husband, wife, spouse
  4. match, equal
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Further readingEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mage (uninflected)

  1. (dated) matching
    • 1895, Magdalene Thoresen, Livsluft: fortaellinger, page 2:
      Den store Kjærlighed, som forenede dem til et i Sandhed mage Par, var vokset i jævn og kraftig Stigning fra Medfølelse til Respekt, fra den til Beundring - og da var der jo ikke ret langt til Kjærligheden!
      The great love that united them into a truly well-fittingcouple, had grown at an even and strong rate from sympathy to respect, from that to admiration - and then there was no far distance to love!
    • 2009, Peter Michael Lauritzen, Grund og bølge: en litterær, tids- og åndshistorisk studie af Erik Aalbæk Jensens forfatterskab, Gyldendal A/S (→ISBN), page 469:
      De er vel tilsyneladende, med hele rigdommens selvsikkerhed, et mere mage par, end den umage Erling [] ville være sammen med Hedvig.
      They are seemingly, with all the confidence of wealth, a more similar pair, than the dissimilar Erling [] would be with Hedvig.
    Synonym: umage
Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Low German māken, from Old Saxon makōn, from Proto-West Germanic *makōn, cognate with English make, German machen, Dutch maken. Old Norse maka, Norwegian make, Swedish maka are also borrowed from Low German. The verb is derived from the adjective Proto-Germanic *makaz (suitable).

VerbEdit

mage (imperative mag, infinitive at mage, present tense mager, past tense magede, perfect tense har maget)

  1. to arrange
Further readingEdit

Dutch Low SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon mago, from Proto-West Germanic *magō, from Proto-Germanic *magô. Cognate with Dutch maag (stomach).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mage f (genitive magen, dative magen, accusative mage, plural magen)

  1. stomach

Usage notesEdit

  • The plural form stays the same in every case.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin magus

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mage m (plural mages)

  1. specialist in occult sciences foretelling the future
    Après une violente dispute avec son mari, elle consulte un mage qui lui prédit un sombre avenir.
  2. (obsolete) magus: priest of the Zoroaster religion, with the Persians and the Medes.
  3. wise man (one of the three wise men that came from the East to Bethlehem for Jesus Christ)
    L’adoration des mages.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

NounEdit

mage ? (plural ?)

  1. stomach

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

mage

  1. Rōmaji transcription of まげ

LatinEdit

NounEdit

mage

  1. vocative singular of magus

ReferencesEdit

  • mage in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mage in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch *mago, from Proto-West Germanic *magō.

NounEdit

māge f or m

  1. stomach
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit
  • Dutch: maag
    • Afrikaans: maag
    • Indonesian: mag
    • Negerhollands: maag
  • Limburgish: maag

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

NounEdit

mâge

  1. inflection of mâech:
    1. dative singular
    2. nominative/accusative/dative plural

Further readingEdit


Middle Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon mago, from Proto-West Germanic *magō. Cognate with German Magen (stomach).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

māge f (genitive magen, dative magen, accusative mage, plural magen)

  1. stomach

Usage notesEdit

  • The plural form stays the same in every case.

SynonymsEdit

  • lif (body, figurative for belly)
  • buk (belly, abdomen)

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse magi, from Proto-Germanic *magô.

NounEdit

mage m (definite singular magen, indefinite plural mager, definite plural magene)

  1. abdomen, belly, stomach

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse magi, from Proto-Germanic *magô. The verb is derived from the noun.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mage m (definite singular magen, indefinite plural magar, definite plural magane)

  1. abdomen, belly, stomach

Alternative formsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

mage (present tense magar, past tense maga, past participle maga, passive infinitive magast, present participle magande, imperative mag)

  1. (transitive) to gut
    Synonym: sløye
  2. (transitive) to regurgitate (to cough up from the gut to feed its young, as an animal or bird does.)
  3. (intransitive or reflexive, rare) to move by crawling with one's belly to the floor or ground

Alternative formsEdit

  • maga (a- or split infinitive)

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish maghi, from Old Norse magi, from Proto-Germanic *magô, from Proto-Indo-European *mak-, *maks-.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /²mɑːɡɛ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

mage c

  1. stomach
  2. abdomen, belly (body part between thorax and pelvis)
    Synonyms: buk, abdomen, (colloquial) kagge
  3. (in idiomatic expressions) insolence, gall, cheek
    Ni hade alltså mage att komma oinbjudna?
    So you had the gall to come uninvited?

DeclensionEdit

Declension of mage 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative mage magen magar magarna
Genitive mages magens magars magarnas

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian maga, from Proto-West Germanic *magō.

NounEdit

mage c (plural magen, diminutive maachje)

  1. stomach

Further readingEdit

  • mage”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011