See also: Pip, píp, and PIP

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English pippe, from Middle Dutch pip, from post-classical Latin pipita, from Latin pītuīta.

NounEdit

pip ‎(plural pips)

  1. Any of various respiratory diseases in birds, especially infectious coryza. [from the 15th c.]
  2. (humorous) Of humans, a disease, malaise or depression.
    • D. H. Lawrence, letter to Edward Garnett
      I've got the pip horribly at present.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter IV:
      With this deal Uncle Tom's got on with Homer Cream, it would be fatal to risk giving [Mrs Cream] the pip in any way.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Apparently representing a shortened form of pippin, from Middle English pipin, from Old French pepin(a seed) (French pépin).

NounEdit

pip ‎(plural pips)

  1. (obsolete) A pippin.
  2. (Britain) A seed inside certain fleshy fruits (compare stone/pit), such as a peach, orange, or apple.
  3. (US, colloquial) Something or someone excellent, of high quality.
    • 2006, Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day, Vintage 2007, p. 612:
      She sure is a pip, that one. You need company?
  4. (Britain, dated, WW I, signalese) P in RAF phonetic alphabet
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Origin uncertain, perhaps related to Etymology 2, above.

NounEdit

pip ‎(plural pips)

  1. One of the spots or symbols on a playing card, domino, die, etc.
  2. (military, public service) One of the stars worn on the shoulder of a uniform to denote rank, e.g. of a soldier or a fireman.
  3. A spot; a speck.
  4. A spot of light or an inverted V indicative of a return of radar waves reflected from an object; a blip.
  5. A piece of rhizome with a dormant shoot of the lily of the valley plant, used for propagation
SynonymsEdit
  • (symbol on playing card etc): spot
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pip ‎(third-person singular simple present pips, present participle pipping, simple past and past participle pipped)

  1. To get the better of; to defeat by a narrow margin
    He led throughout the race but was pipped at the post.
  2. To hit with a gunshot
    The hunter managed to pip three ducks from his blind.

Etymology 4Edit

Imitative.

VerbEdit

pip ‎(third-person singular simple present pips, present participle pipping, simple past and past participle pipped)

  1. To peep, to chirp
  2. (avian biology) To make the initial hole during the process of hatching from an egg

Etymology 5Edit

Imitative.

NounEdit

pip ‎(plural pips)

Examples
(file)
  1. One of a series of very short, electronically produced tones, used, for example, to count down the final few seconds before a given time or to indicate that a caller using a payphone needs to make further payment if he is to continue his call.
    • 1982 John Banville, The Newton Letter
      I could clearly hear the frequent cataclysms of the upstairs lavatory, and my day began with the pips for the morning news in Charlotte Lawless's kitchen.
SynonymsEdit
  • (electronic sound, counting down seconds): stroke
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 6Edit

Abbreviation of percentage in point.

NounEdit

pip ‎(plural pips)

  1. (finance, currency trading) The smallest price increment between two currencies in foreign exchange (forex) trading.
    • 2012, Abe Cofnas, The Forex Trading Course
      The set-and-forget trader is playing fundamental direction and is seeking very large moves of 150 to 300 pips.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A descriptive term, similar to German piepen and Latin pipīre.

VerbEdit

pip ‎(first-person singular past tense pipa, participle pipur)

  1. to peep, to chirp

Etymology 2Edit

From Romance *pīpa, also present in Old French pipe, Italian pipa etc.

NounEdit

pip f (indefinite plural pipa, definite singular pipa, definite plural pipat)

  1. sprout, shoot
  2. pipe, tube

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pip n (singular definite pippet, plural indefinite pip)

  1. chirp, peep, tweet
  2. bleep

InflectionEdit

NounEdit

pip n

  1. nonsense, gibberish, madness

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch pip(disease of poultry, also of people), from post-classical Latin pipita, from Latin pītuīta(slime, head cold).

NounEdit

pip m ‎(uncountable)

  1. Pip (any of various respiratory diseases in birds, especially infectious coryza).
  2. (humorous or colloquial) Of humans, a disease (particularly the common cold or the flu), malaise or depression.

Derived termsEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

pip

  1. rafsi of plipe.

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

pip n

  1. squeak, beep

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of pip 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative pip pipet pip pipen
Genitive pips pipets pips pipens

VerbEdit

pip

  1. imperative of pipa.

VolapükEdit

NounEdit

pip ‎(plural pips)

  1. pipe (for smoking)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit