See also: Rack, RACK, and räck

English edit

A rack for weights in a gym
A dish rack holding some plates
A torture rack (sense 3)
A rack (sense 13) of pool balls
A rack (sense 12) of lamb in a butcher's shop
A climber's rack (sense 17)
A woman with a big rack (sense 15)

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English rakke, rekke, from Middle Dutch rac, recke, rec (Dutch rek), see rekken.

Noun edit

rack (plural racks)

  1. A series of one or more shelves, stacked one above the other
  2. Any of various kinds of frame for holding luggage or other objects on a vehicle or vessel.
    Synonym: luggage rack
  3. (historical) A device, incorporating a ratchet, used to torture victims by stretching them beyond their natural limits.
  4. (nautical) A piece or frame of wood, having several sheaves, through which the running rigging passes.
    Synonym: rack block
  5. (nautical, slang) A bunk.
    • 2008, Byron L. Smith, Prescription Music, →ISBN, page 33:
      Chief Stevens approached my rack and repeatedly ordered me to vacate my rack and report to the working party.
    • 2010, Herb Brewer, Chronicles of a Marine Rifleman: Vietnam, 1965-1966, →ISBN, page 171:
      By the time I had unpacked my sea bag, made my rack, and finished a good long hot shower, it was late in the evening.
    • 2016, Cpl. Osborn R. E, Like Killing Rats, →ISBN:
      I took off my helmet, sat it gently down at the head of my rack on the wooden deck, plopped my butt down on my rack again, and began taking off my stateside assbusting boots.
  6. (nautical, by extension, slang, uncountable) Sleep.
  7. A distaff.
  8. (mechanical engineering, rail transport) A bar with teeth on its face or edge, to work with those of a gearwheel, pinion, or worm, which is to drive or be driven by it.
    • 1950 November, H. P. White, “The Furka-Oberalp Railway”, in Railway Magazine, page 767:
      Just beyond that station the first step is encountered and the rack resorted to, taking the line on a gradient of 1 in 9 over a steeply inclined bridge and through a spiral tunnel.
    • 1960 December, 'Voyageur', “The Mountain Railways of the Bernese Oberland”, in Trains Illustrated, page 750:
      The ladder-type Riggenbach rack is the one in use on both systems.
  9. (mechanical engineering) A bar with teeth on its face or edge, to work with a pawl as a ratchet allowing movement in one direction only, used for example in a handbrake or crossbow.
  10. A cranequin, a mechanism including a rack, pinion and pawl, providing both mechanical advantage and a ratchet, used to bend and cock a crossbow.
  11. A set of antlers (as on deer, moose or elk).
  12. A cut of meat involving several adjacent ribs.
    I bought a rack of lamb at the butcher's yesterday.
  13. (billiards, snooker) A hollow triangle used for aligning the balls at the start of a game.
  14. (gambling) A plastic tray used for holding and moving chips.
  15. (slang, vulgar) A woman's breasts.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:breasts
  16. (climbing, caving) A friction device for abseiling, consisting of a frame with five or more metal bars, around which the rope is threaded.
    rappel rack
    abseil rack
  17. (climbing, slang) A climber's set of equipment for setting up protection and belays, consisting of runners, slings, carabiners, nuts, Friends, etc.
    I used almost a full rack on the second pitch.
  18. A grate on which bacon is laid.
  19. (algebra) A set with a distributive binary operation whose result is unique.
  20. (slang) A thousand, especially if proceeds of a crime.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old English reċċan (to stretch out, extend).

Verb edit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. To place in or hang on a rack.
  2. To torture (someone) on the rack.
  3. To cause (someone) to suffer pain.
  4. (figurative) To stretch or strain; to harass, or oppress by extortion.
  5. (billiards, snooker, pool) To put the balls into the triangular rack and set them in place on the table.
    Synonym: rack up
  6. (slang, transitive) To strike in the testicles.
    • 1999 November 2, Squad Leader, “CUPS Required for Gym Class?”, in alt.support.jock-strap[1] (Usenet):
      Bike7125 raises a great point suggesting that cups could have been recommended "optional" equipment in school PE. I never got racked by a baseball or softball, but we did have a gym teacher, who insisted on a weekly session of a "cruelty sport" called bombardment. The idea was to throw basketballs at a line of guys, and try to hit them. (Guess where most gym bullys aimed!)
  7. (firearms) To (manually) load (a round of ammunition) from the magazine or belt into firing position in an automatic or semiautomatic firearm.
  8. (firearms) To move the slide bar on a shotgun in order to chamber the next round.
  9. (mining) To wash (metals, ore, etc.) on a rack.
  10. (nautical) To bind together, as two ropes, with cross turns of yarn, marline, etc.
  11. (structural engineering) To tend to shear a structure (that is, force it to bend, lean, or move in different directions at different points).
    Synonym: shear
    Post-and-lintel construction racks easily.
    • 1977, Roger L. Tuomi, David S. Gromala, “Racking Strength of Walls”, in USDA Forest Service Research Paper[2], number FPL 301:
      The racking strength of a wall system is defined in terms of its ability to resist horizon­tal inplane shear forces. The shear, or racking, forces which act on wail systems arise primarily from wind.
Usage notes edit

In senses “torture” and “suffer pain”, frequently confused with wrack (destroy) (more rarely, wrack (wreckage)), both as stand-alone verb and in compounds.[1] In most uses, rack is correct, and wrack is incorrect.[2] Etymologically, nerve-racking (stressful), pain-racked, and rack one's brain, rack one's brains (think hard) are correct, while rack and ruin and storm-racked are incorrect variants of wrack and ruin (complete destruction) and storm-wracked (wrecked by a storm).

Usage guidance differs: either prefer the etymologically correct term, prefer rack to (archaic) wrack, or use either. The etymologically correct forms are preferred by some style guides,[3] but the unetymological forms are well-established and in wide use, and other style guides simply consider them variant spellings.[4] Other style guides categorically ban wrack as archaic, suggesting modern synonyms like wreck, ruin, or destroy.[5] In some cases style guides are confused by the etymology, or feature unhistorical forms such as nerve-wracking.[6]

This confusion dates to Early Modern English in the 16th century (as in rack and ruin), and is presumably due to the influence of ⟨wr⟩ in words such as wreak, wreck, wrench, etc., which connote discomfort and torment.[7] Formally termed the graphaesthesia of the graphaestheme ⟨wr⟩, since identical sound /r/ to ⟨r⟩; compare with phonaesthesia.[8] Compare rapt/wrapt, and also ⟨gh⟩ as in ghost and ghastly.

Conjugation edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English reken, from Old Norse reka (to be drifted, tost)[9]

The noun is from Middle English rak, rakke, from Middle English rek (drift; thing tossed ashore; jetsam), from the verb.

Verb edit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. To drive; move; go forward rapidly; stir.
  2. To fly, as vapour or broken clouds.
Translations edit

Noun edit

rack (uncountable)

  1. Thin, flying, broken clouds, or any portion of floating vapour in the sky.

Etymology 4 edit

From Middle English rakken.

Verb edit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. (brewing) To clarify, and thereby deter further fermentation of, beer, wine or cider by draining or siphoning it from the dregs.
    • 1631, Francis [Bacon], “(please specify |century=I to X)”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] William Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], →OCLC:
      It is in common practice to draw wine or beer from the lees (which we call racking), whereby it will clarify much the sooner.
Translations edit

Etymology 5 edit

See rack (that which stretches), or rock (verb).

Verb edit

rack (third-person singular simple present racks, present participle racking, simple past and past participle racked)

  1. (of a horse) To amble fast, causing a rocking or swaying motion of the body; to pace.
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, edited by James Nichols, The Church History of Britain, [], new edition, volumes (please specify |volume=I to III), London: [] [James Nichols] for Thomas Tegg and Son, [], published 1837, →OCLC:
      The other two (only racking, no thorough-paced protestants) watched their opportunity to run away
      The spelling has been modernized.

Noun edit

rack (plural racks)

  1. A fast amble.

Etymology 6 edit

See wreck.

Noun edit

rack (plural racks)

  1. (obsolete) A wreck; destruction.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 7 edit

Uncertain. Perhaps a contraction of rabbock, an alteration ( +‎ -ock) of rabbit.

Noun edit

rack (plural racks)

  1. (obsolete) A young rabbit, or its skin.
    • 1869 February 13, “Rabbit Skin”, in All the Year Round, page 247:
      Now, sir, you would say a skin is a skin, we say it is a ' whole,' or a 'half,' or a 'quarter,' or a 'rack,' or a 'sucker. Suckers are skins of infant rabbits, and of little value. Eight racks are equal to one whole.
    • 1879, Ure's Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, and Mines, page 380:
      The skin of a sucker is white, of a quarter, black and white striped, of a rack all black, and of a best all white.
    • 1882, Bees, rabbits, and pigeons; how to breed and how to rear them:
      Those would be of different shades of colour according to the time of year at which they were produced, those bred about May-day undergoing no change from their white colour, but from a white rack become a whole skin; []
    • 1892, Henry Poland, Fur-bearing Animals in Nature and in Commerce, page 289:
      Rabbit skins are sorted into wholes, halves, quarters, racks, and suckers, or very small skins.

Etymology 8 edit

Noun edit

rack (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of arak
    • 1907, George Manville Fenn, Trapped by Malays: A Tale of Bayonet and Kris, page 347:
      If it was my officers wanted a stone jar of rack or a dozen of bottled ale, I might manage 'em, but I'm nowhere with sacks.
Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Garner’s Modern American Usage
  2. ^ Charles Harrington Elster (2010) The Accidents of Style: Good Advice on How Not to Write Badly, pages 169–170: “In all other familiar contexts, the proper spelling is rack.”
  3. ^ rack/wrack”, The Mavens’ Word of the Day, April 20, 1998
  4. ^ Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English Usage, 1994:
    “Probably the most sensible attitude would be to ignore the etymologies of rack and wrack (which, of course, is exactly what most people do) and regard them simply as spelling variants of one word. If you choose to toe the line drawn by the commentators, however, you will want to write nerve-racking, rack one’s brains, storm-wracked, and for good measure wrack and ruin. Then you will have nothing to worry about being criticized for — except, of course, for using too many clichés.”
  5. ^ The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage, 5th edition, “wrack”, 2015
  6. ^ The Associated Press (2015) The Associated Press Stylebook 2015, “wrack”
  7. ^ Kay, Christian J. and Wotherspoon, Irené. 2002. “Wreak, wrack, rack, and (w)ruin: the History of Some Confused Spellings”, in Sounds, Words, Texts and Change: Papers from 11 ICEHL, ed. by Teresa Fanego, Belen Mendez-Naya and Elena Seoane. Amsterdam: Benjamins, pp. 129–143.
  8. ^ Kay & Wotherspoon, 2002, p. 139 and footnotes 8 and 9, pp. 141–142
  9. ^ rack”, in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, Springfield, Mass.: G. & C. Merriam, 1913, →OCLC.

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from English rack.

Noun edit

rack n (plural rackuri)

  1. rack

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Noun edit

rack m (plural racks)

  1. rack

Swedish edit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

Noun edit

rack n

  1. a rack (for holding electronic equipment)
    serverrack
    server rack
    stereorack
    stereo rack
  2. Synonym of racket (considered erroneous by some – see the usage notes for that entry)

Declension edit

Declension of rack 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative rack racket rack racken
Genitive racks rackets racks rackens

See also edit

See also (racket) edit

References edit