thereabouts

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PIE word
*só
PIE word
*úd

The adverb is derived from Middle English there-aboutes, þare aboutes (of a place or an object: around there, in its vicinity; of time: about then, around that time) [and other forms],[1] from ther (in that place, in those places, there; on that; thither, to that place; from there, thence; at that time; thereupon; in that situation, under those circumstances; in that case, with regard to that)[2] (from Old English þǣr (there)) + aboutes (in all directions, around, adverb),[3] aboutes (in all directions from, on all sides of; near; concerned with, preposition)[4] (from aboute, abouten (so as to surround; so as to cover; on the border or edge; as measured around the outside; to as to travel around something; so as to revolve about an axis or centre; aside; in all directions; in the vicinity; in connection with something; in several places; everywhere, throughout; to all or everyone; almost, approximately; concerning; in succession; so as to be or happen, adverb),[5] aboute, abouten (surrounding; covering; over; upon; on the border of; in all directions; in the vicinity of, near to; in several places; everywhere, throughout; almost, approximately; concerning; engaged in; on behalf of, preposition)[6] (from Old English abūtan, onbūtan (about; round about; on; on the outside)) + -s (suffix forming adverbs));[7] see further at thereabout. The English word is analysable as thereabout +‎ -s (suffix forming adverbs).[8][9]

The noun may result from a confusion of thereabouts with whereabouts.

The word is attested later than thereabout.[8]

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

thereabouts (not comparable)

  1. Synonym of thereabout:
    1. About or near that place.
    2. About or around that date or time.
    3. About or near to that condition or quality.
    4. Approximately that number or quantity.
    5. (obsolete)
      1. About that; concerning that.
      2. (figuratively) Near to that activity or situation.
        • c. 1606–1607, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene x], page 355, column 2:
          Cam. [i.e., Canidus.] Our Fortune on the Sea is out of breath, / And ſinkes moſt lamentably. Had our Generall / Bin what he knew himſelfe, it had gone well: / Oh his [i.e., he] ha's giuen example for our flight, / Moſt groſſely by his owne. / Eno[barbus]. I, are you thereabouts? Why then goodnight indeede.
          Canidus. Our fortune [in the battle] on the sea is out of breath, / And sinks most lamentably. Had our general / Been his old self, it would have gone well. / Oh, he has given us an example for our desertion, / Most grossly by his own. / Enobarbus. Ay, are you near that situation [i.e., also considering desertion]? Why, then we must be at the end indeed.
        • c. 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The VVinters Tale”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene ii], page 280, column 2:
          Cam[illo]. I dare not know (my Lord.) / Pol[ixenes]. How, dare not? doe not? doe you know, and dare not? / Be intelligent to me, 'tis thereabouts: / For to your ſelfe, what you doe know, you muſt, / And cannot ſay, you dare not.
        • 1675, John Driden [i.e., John Dryden], The Rival Ladies. A Tragi-comedy. [], London: [] T[homas] N[ewcomb] for Henry Herringman, [], OCLC 1227590060, Act IV, scene iii, page 46:
          Amid[eo]. [] [D]o not work / Upon my pity; for I feel already / My ſtout heart melts. / Hip[polito]. Oh! are you thereabouts?

Usage notesEdit

Thereabouts is more common in the English spoken in Southern England than thereabout.[8]

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Here-, there-, and where- words

NounEdit

thereabouts pl (plural only)

  1. (possibly erroneous) Location; whereabouts.
    • 1905, Robert Ernest Vernède, The Pursuit of Mr. Faviel, page 89:
      True, he had stopped at Langston Bucket by chance, and there was no reason why Mr. Boke should theorise as to his thereabouts.
    • 2014, Dave Duncan, The Stricken Field:
      My companions are not far off, and are aware of my thereabouts.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ thē̆r-abǒutes, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ thē̆r, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  3. ^ abǒutes, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  4. ^ abǒutes, prep.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  5. ^ abǒute(n, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  6. ^ abǒute(n, prep.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  7. ^ -(e)s, suf.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 thereabouts, adv.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021.
  9. ^ thereabouts (also thereabout), adv.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

AnagramsEdit