wherewithal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

where +‎ withal

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈwɛə.wɪ.ðɔːl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈwɛəɹ.wɪ.ðɔl/, /ˈwɛəɹ.wɪ.θɔl/
  • (cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /ˈwɛəɹ.wɪ.ðɑl/, /ˈwɛəɹ.wɪ.θɑl/
  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

wherewithal (countable and uncountable, plural wherewithals)

  1. The ability and means required to accomplish some task.
    I would like to help your project, but I do not have the wherewithal.
    • 1986, David Leavitt, The Lost Language of Cranes, Penguin, paperback edition, page 67:
      "I just can't imagine," Philip said, "having that kind of self-knowledge, that kind of...wherewithal at fifteen. [] "
    • 2011 December 15, Felicity Cloake, “How to cook the perfect nut roast”, in Guardian[1]:
      Breadcrumbs play second fiddle to a medley of almonds, Brazils, chestnuts, pine nuts and pistachios which, although tangy with lemon juice and garlic, is outrageously dense. A single slice of this could leave you supine in front of the Queen's speech without even the wherewithal to reach for the remote control.
    • 2019, John O’Connell, Bowie's Bookshelf, →ISBN:
      Although Emma comes to realise she's trapped in a kind of hell, married to a dullard she despises, she lacks the intellectual wherewithal to plot a breakout more sophisticated than consorting with idiots such as Leon and Rodolphe.

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

wherewithal (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) In what way; how.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Here-, there-, and where- words