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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French amirail, amiral (modern French amiral), from a shortening of Arabic أَمِير اَلبَحْر(ʾamīr al-baḥr, commander of the fleet, literally sea commander). Akin to amir, Amir, and emir. The -d- is probably from the influence of the otherwise unconnected admirable (Latin admirabilis).

First recorded in English in September 1300, in a description of Gerard Allard of Winchelsea as “Admiral of the Fleet of the Cinque Ports”.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈæd.mə.ɹəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈæd.mə.ɹəl/, /ˈæd.mɚl̩/
  • (file)

NounEdit

admiral (plural admirals)

  1. A naval officer of the highest rank; the commander of a country's naval forces.
  2. A naval officer of high rank, immediately below Admiral of the Fleet; the commander of a fleet or squadron.
  3. A flag officer in the United States Navy or Coast Guard of a grade superior to vice admiral and junior to admiral of the fleet (when that grade is used). An admiral is equal in grade or rank to a four-star general.
  4. The ship which carries the admiral, the flagship; also, the most considerable ship of a fleet.
  5. (obsolete) A prince or Saracen leader under the Sultan.
  6. Any of various nymphalid butterflies of the genera Kaniska and Vanessa, especially a red admiral or white admiral.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ The Mastery of the Sea, by Cyril Field, page 234
  2. ^ admiral” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2019.

AnagramsEdit


CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English admiral, from Old French amirail, amiral (modern French amiral), from Arabic أَمِيرُ البَحْر(ʾamīru l-baḥr, commander of the fleet).

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: ad‧mi‧ral

NounEdit

admiral

  1. (military) an admiral

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch admiraal

NounEdit

admiral m

  1. admiral

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic أَمِير الْبَحْر(ʾamīr al-baḥr, commander of the fleet), via French amiral

NounEdit

admiral m (definite singular admiralen, indefinite plural admiraler, definite plural admiralene)

(military, nautical) an admiral

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic أَمِير الْبَحْر(ʾamīr al-baḥr, commander of the fleet), via French amiral

NounEdit

admiral m (definite singular admiralen, indefinite plural admiralar, definite plural admiralane)

(military, nautical) an admiral

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic اَمِير(amīr, commander) + -al.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /admǐraːl/
  • Hyphenation: ad‧mi‧ral

NounEdit

admìrāl m (Cyrillic spelling адмѝра̄л)

  1. admiral

DeclensionEdit


TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English admiral.

NounEdit

ádmirál

  1. (military) admiral

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit