Translingual edit

Symbol edit

ae

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Avestan.

English edit

Etymology edit

Variant form of æ.

Pronunciation edit

Symbol edit

ae

  1. Alternative form of æ.

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Abinomn edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. mother

Aore edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. water

Further reading edit

  • Darrell T. Tryon, New Hebrides languages: an internal classification (1976)
  • ABVD

Barai edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

ae (upper case Ae)

  1. A letter of the Barai alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Bislama edit

Etymology edit

From English eye.

Noun edit

ae

  1. (anatomy) eye

Danish edit

Etymology edit

Probably derived from the interjection ah.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

ae (past tense aede, past participle aet)

  1. to stroke, pat, caress

Conjugation edit

Eastern Ngad'a edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. water

References edit

Ende edit

 
wai

Etymology edit

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun edit

ae

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

References edit

  • Bradley J. McDonnell, Possessive Structures in Ende: a Language of Eastern Indonesia

Irish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Irish áe (liver), from Old Irish óa, from Proto-Celtic *awV-. Compare Welsh afu.

Noun edit

ae m (genitive singular ae, nominative plural aenna)

  1. (anatomy) liver
Declension edit
  • Alternative plural: aebha, aobha
  • Alternative genitive plural: ae (in certain phrases)
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

ae m (genitive singular ae)

  1. Alternative form of aoi (metrical composition)
Declension edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ae n-ae hae t-ae
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

References edit

  1. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, page 64

Kala edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. tree

Further reading edit

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988) (ai)
  • Morris Johnson, Kela Organized Phonology Data (1994) (ae)

Khumi Chin edit

 
Ae.

Etymology edit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *ʔaar. Cognates include Zou ah and Mizo ár.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. chicken

References edit

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[1], Payap University, page 44

Lavukaleve edit

Verb edit

ae

  1. (intransitive) go up

Li'o edit

 
ae

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

Noun edit

ae

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

References edit

  • P. Sawardo, Struktur bahasa Lio (1987)
  • Louise Baird, A Grammar of Kéo: An Austronesian Language of East Nusantara (2002) ('aé)

Lote edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. tree

References edit

Marshallese edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. current
  2. pool

Verb edit

ae

  1. collect
  2. gather, grouping

References edit

Mbyá Guaraní edit

Particle edit

ae

  1. emphatic particle
    apy ae
    right here

Middle Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

ae … ae

  1. eitheror
    • Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet:
      Sef kyfryw chware a wneynt, taraw a wnai pob un dyrnawt ar y got, ae a’e droet ae a throssawl;
      In this manner they played the game, each of them striking the bag, either with his foot or with a staff.

Descendants edit

  • Welsh: ai

Niuean edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Nuclear Polynesian *a(a)e.

Interjection edit

ae

  1. used to draw attention; hey!
  2. expression of surprise; oh!

Pará Arára edit

Alternative forms edit

  • aege (used when talking to a capuchin monkey)

Noun edit

ae

  1. a wasp

References edit

  • 2010, Isaac Costa de Souza, A Phonological Description of “Pet Talk” in Arara (MA), SIL Brazil, page 42.

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

From .

Interjection edit

ae

  1. (Internet slang, Brazil) oh yeah (expression of joy or approvement)

Sardinian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin avem, accusative of avis.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ae f (plural aes)

  1. (Logudorese) bird (in general), especially eagles or other birds of prey
    Synonyms: achedda, puzone

Usage notes edit

According to Max Leopold Wagner, ae means 'bird' in a general, almost collective, sense, while a specific bird is usually called a puzone. The term also has a tendency to mean 'eagle' in central dialects, and by extension also 'vulture' and other birds of prey.

Further reading edit

  • Rubattu, Antoninu (2006), “uccello”, in Dizionario universale della lingua di Sardegna, 2nd edition, Sassari: Edes
  • Wagner, Max Leopold (1960–1964), “áve”, in Dizionario etimologico sardo, Heidelberg

Scots edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Northern Middle English a, apocopic form of ane, from Old English ān (one), from Proto-West Germanic *ain. See also Scots ane.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

ae

  1. one
    Synonym: ane
    • 1786, Robert Burns, A Winter Night:
      Ae night the storm the steeples rocked
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1875, William Alexander, Sketches of Life Among My Ain Folk, page 51:
      "A twa-horse wark, maybe? or dee ye make it oot wi' ae beast an' an owse?"
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Pronoun edit

ae

  1. one (of the two)
  2. one, someone (indefinite)

Adjective edit

ae (not comparable)

  1. one, the same

Adverb edit

ae (not comparable)

  1. only
  2. about, approximately
    Synonym: a
  3. (poetic) Emphasises a superlative.

Derived terms edit

References edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 The Concise Scots Dictionary, 1985, Aberdeen University Press editor-in-chief Mairi Robinson, →ISBN
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 ae, adj..” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

Teanu edit

Etymology edit

Possibly from earlier *kel, from Proto-Oceanic *keli, from Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *keli, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *kali, from Proto-Austronesian *kalih. But this etymology remains dubious.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

ae

  1. to dig, hollow out

References edit

Touo edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. father; Short for finɔ ae.
  2. Short for atufe ae.
    1. stepfather; mother's new husband
    2. father's brother
    3. husband of one's mother's sister
    4. son of one's father's sister
    5. son-in-law of one's father's sister
    6. son of one's father's parallel cousin
    7. paternal grandson of one's paternal grandparent's sister
  3. grandfather (on both sides); Short for fizu ae.
  4. Short for fizu atufe ae.
    1. grandfather's brother
    2. maternal grandmother's brother
    3. son of one's grandfather's sister
    4. maternal grandson of one's grandfather's sister
    5. husband of one's father's sister
    6. male parallel cousin-in-law of one's father

Usage notes edit

  • All the relations above can be simply stated as ae unless the speaker wishes to avoid ambiguity, much as English speakers will say cousin without specifying second cousin, etc.

Coordinate terms edit

  • ina (mother, various other meanings)

References edit

  • Scheffler, H. W. (1972), “Baniata Kin Classification: The Case for Extensions”, in Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, volume 28, issue 4, University of Chicago Press, pages 350—381

West Makian edit

Etymology edit

Possibly cognate with Ternate hohe (to laugh).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

ae

  1. (intransitive) to laugh

Conjugation edit

Conjugation of ae (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person taae maae aae
2nd person naae faae
3rd person inanimate iae daae
animate
imperative naae, ae faae, ae

References edit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[2], Pacific linguistics

Wolio edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qaqay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaqay.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ae

  1. foot, leg

References edit

  • Anceaux, Johannes C. (1987) Wolio Dictionary (Wolio-English-Indonesian) / Kamus Bahasa Wolio (Wolio-Inggeris-Indonesia), Dordrecht: Foris

Zhuang edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Classifier edit

ae (Sawndip forms or ⿰亻界 or 𠲖, 1957–1982 spelling əi)

  1. used for adult men

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Tai *ʔajᴬ (to cough). Cognate with Thai ไอ (ai), Northern Thai ᩋᩱ, Lao ໄອ (ʼai), ᦺᦀ (˙ʼay), Shan ဢႆ (ʼǎi), Tai Nüa ᥟᥭ (ʼay), Aiton ဢႝ (ʼay), Ahom 𑜒𑜩 (ʼay), Saek ไอ๋.

Verb edit

ae (Sawndip forms or 𧙜 or 𠲖 or , 1957–1982 spelling əi)

  1. to cough