EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Scottish Middle English a-, from Old English ān (one); see also a.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /i/, /e(ː)/, /ə/

AdjectiveEdit

ae (not comparable)

  1. (Scotland) one

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

Etymology 2Edit

Variant form of æ.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /iː/, /eɪ/, /ə/

SymbolEdit

ae

  1. Variant of æ.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


AbinomnEdit

NounEdit

ae

  1. mother

AoreEdit

NounEdit

ae

  1. water

Further readingEdit

  • Darrell T. Tryon, New Hebrides languages: an internal classification (1976)
  • ABVD

BislamaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English eye.

NounEdit

ae

  1. (anatomy) eye

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably derived from the interjection ah.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ae (past tense aede, past participle aet)

  1. to stroke, pat, caress

InflectionEdit


Eastern Ngad'aEdit

NounEdit

ae

  1. water

ReferencesEdit


EndeEdit

 
wai

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Central-Eastern Malayo-Polynesian *waiʀ, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

NounEdit

ae

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

ReferencesEdit

  • Bradley J. McDonnell, Possessive Structures in Ende: a Language of Eastern Indonesia

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Irish áe (liver), from Old Irish óa, from Proto-Celtic *awV-. Compare Welsh afu.

NounEdit

ae m (genitive singular ae, nominative plural aenna)

  1. (anatomy) liver
DeclensionEdit
  • Alternative plural: aebha, aobha
  • Alternative genitive plural: ae (in certain phrases)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

ae m (genitive singular ae)

  1. Alternative form of aoi (metrical composition)
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ae n-ae hae t-ae
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


KalaEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ae

  1. tree

Further readingEdit

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988) (ai)
  • Morris Johnson, Kela Organized Phonology Data (1994) (ae)

Khumi ChinEdit

 
Ae.

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Kuki-Chin *ʔaar. Cognates include Zou ah and Mizo ár.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ae

  1. chicken

ReferencesEdit

  • K. E. Herr (2011) The phonological interpretation of minor syllables, applied to Lemi Chin[1], Payap University, page 44

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

ae

  1. nominative feminine plural of us
  2. genitive feminine singular of us
  3. dative feminine singular of us
  4. vocative feminine plural of us

ReferencesEdit


LavukaleveEdit

VerbEdit

ae

  1. (intransitive) go up

Li'oEdit

 
ae

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *wahiʀ.

NounEdit

ae

  1. water (clear liquid H₂O)

ReferencesEdit

  • P. Sawardo, Struktur bahasa Lio (1987)
  • Louise Baird, A Grammar of Kéo: An Austronesian Language of East Nusantara (2002) ('aé)

LoteEdit

NounEdit

ae

  1. tree

ReferencesEdit


Middle WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ae ... ae

  1. either ... or
    • Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet:
      Sef kyfryw chware a wneynt, taraw a wnai pob un dyrnawt ar y got, ae a’e droet ae a throssawl;
      In this manner they played the game, each of them striking the bag, either with his foot or with a staff.

DescendantsEdit

  • Welsh: ai

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From .

InterjectionEdit

ae

  1. (Internet slang, Brazil) oh yeah (expression of joy or approvement)

SardinianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin avem, accusative of avis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ae f (plural aes)

  1. bird
    Synonyms: achedda, pizone

ScotsEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scottish Middle English a-, from Old English ān (one); see also a.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

ae

  1. one
    • 1786, Robert Burns, A Winter Night:
      Ae night the storm the steeples rocked
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    Synonym: ane

PronounEdit

ae

  1. one (of the two)
  2. one, someone (indefinite)

SynonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ae (not comparable)

  1. one, the same

AdverbEdit

ae (not comparable)

  1. only
  2. about, approximately
    Synonym: a
  3. (poetic) Emphasises a superlative.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 The Concise Scots Dictionary, 1985, Aberdeen University Press editor-in-chief Mairi Robinson, →ISBN
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 ae, adj..” in the Dictionary of the Scots Language, Edinburgh: Scottish Language Dictionaries.

WolioEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *qaqay, from Proto-Austronesian *qaqay.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ae

  1. foot, leg

ReferencesEdit

  • Anceaux, Johannes C. 1987. Wolio Dictionary (Wolio-English-Indonesian) / Kamus Bahasa Wolio (Wolio-Inggeris-Indonesia). Dordrecht: Foris.

ZhuangEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

ClassifierEdit

ae (Sawndip forms or ⿰亻界 or 𠲖, old orthography əi)

  1. used for adult men

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Tai *ʔajᴬ (to cough). Cognate with Thai ไอ (ai), Northern Thai ᩋᩱ, Lao ໄອ (ʼai), ᦺᦀ (˙ʼay), Shan ဢႆ (ʼǎy), Tai Nüa ᥟᥭ (ʼay), Aiton ဢႝ, Ahom 𑜒𑜩 (ʼay), Saek ไอ๋.

VerbEdit

ae (Sawndip forms or 𧙜 or 𠲖 or , old orthography əi)

  1. to cough