Translingual edit

Symbol edit

ave

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Avestan.

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin ave.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ave (plural aves)

  1. An Ave Maria.
    • 1913, “Danny Boy”, Frederic Weatherly (lyrics):
      Ye’ll come and find the place where I am lying
      And kneel and say an ave there for me.
  2. A reverential salutation.

Interjection edit

ave

  1. A reverential salutation.

Etymology 2 edit

Abbreviation.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ave (plural aves)

  1. Abbreviation of avenue.
  2. Abbreviation of average.

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse agi (fear, discipline).

Noun edit

ave c

  1. discipline, keeping in check
    Du skal holde forureningen i ave.
    You must keep the pollution in check.

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin āve.

Noun edit

ave n (singular definite avet, plural indefinite ave)

  1. Ave Maria
Inflection edit

Etymology 3 edit

From Old Norse aga (frighten, scare).

Verb edit

ave (imperative av, infinitive at ave, present tense aver, past tense avede, perfect tense har avet)

  1. discipline, check, restrain
Conjugation edit

Esperanto edit

Etymology edit

From avo +‎ -e.

Adverb edit

ave

  1. grandfatherly (in the manner or way of a grandfather)

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ava.

Noun edit

ave f (plural avis)

  1. grandmother

Synonyms edit

Related terms edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese ave, from Latin avis, avem, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ave f (plural aves)

  1. bird
    Synonym: (smaller birds) paxaro

References edit

  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “ave”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • Xavier Varela Barreiro, Xavier Gómez Guinovart (20062018) “ave”, in Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • ave” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • ave” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • ave” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Interlingua edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin avis.

Noun edit

ave (plural aves)

  1. bird

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin ave.

Interjection edit

ave

  1. hail

Italian edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ave.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.ve/
  • Rhymes: -ave
  • Hyphenation: à‧ve

Interjection edit

ave

  1. hail

Noun edit

ave f

  1. plural of ava

Anagrams edit

Kabuverdianu edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Portuguese ave.

Noun edit

ave

  1. (Barlavento) bird

References edit

  • Gonçalves, Manuel (2015) Capeverdean Creole-English dictionary, →ISBN
  • Veiga, Manuel (2012) Dicionário Caboverdiano-Português, Instituto da Biblioteca Nacional e do Livro

Latin edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Borrowed with an unspelled /h/ from Punic [script needed] (ḥawe, live!, 2sg. imp.), cognate to Hebrew חוה (Chava, the biblical Eve), and as avō from Punic [script needed] (ḥawū, 2pl. imp.), from Semitic root ḥ-w-y (live). The form might have been contaminated by Etymology 2, especially as the latter one's long vowel also ended up short via iambic shortening; this would explain the reluctance to spell the aspirate, as well as its interpretation as a verb form. Attested since Plautus.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Interjection edit

avē̆

  1. hail, hello, farewell, greetings! (a formal expression of greeting)
    Synonym: (h)avētō
    Aue Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum.
    Avē̆ atque valē!
    Hail and farewell! (esp. before a long departure and as a last good-bye to the dead).
    Avē̆ imperātor, moritūrī tē salūtant!
    Hail, commander, the ones going to their deaths salute you!
Usage notes edit
  • Outside of grammarians, the plural (h)avēte is attested only once in Apuleius, who is known for affecting archaisms. This suggests that this greeting didn't usually inflect for number, reflecting its originally being an interjection and not a verbal form; nevertheless, it was eventually widely interpreted as the latter.
  • The other verbal forms cited by grammarians are the future imperative avētō , ille (greetings to you, him) etc., and the infinitive in the circumlocution avēre volō (after the same use with valēre and the very rare salvēre).
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

avē

  1. second-person singular present imperative of aveō

Etymology 3 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

ave m

  1. vocative singular of avus

Etymology 4 edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun edit

ave f

  1. ablative singular of avis

References edit

  1. ^ Marcus Fabius Quintilianus (2021 April 1 (last accessed)) “Declamationes Minores”, in latin.packhum.org[1] (in Latin), 1.6.1.1

Further reading edit

  • ave in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.
  • ave in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Northern Sami edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈave/

Verb edit

ave

  1. inflection of avvit:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. imperative connegative

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ave (hail!).

Noun edit

ave n (definite singular avet, indefinite plural aver, definite plural ava or avene)

  1. An Ave Maria

References edit

Anagrams edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ave (hail!).

Noun edit

ave n (definite singular avet, indefinite plural ave, definite plural ava)

  1. An Ave Maria

References edit

Anagrams edit

Old Galician-Portuguese edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Latin avis (bird), from Proto-Italic *awis (bird), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis (bird).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ave f

  1. bird
Descendants edit
  • Galician: ave
  • Portuguese: ave

Etymology 2 edit

From Latin avē (hail).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.βe/, /a.ˈβɛ/

Noun edit

ave f

  1. hail (introduces a formal greeting)
Descendants edit

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from Latin avē̆.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈa.vɛ/
  • Rhymes: -avɛ
  • Syllabification: a‧ve

Interjection edit

ave

  1. (literary) ave (reverential salutation)

Further reading edit

  • ave in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese ave (bird), from Latin avis (bird), from Proto-Italic *awis (bird), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis (bird).

Pronunciation edit

 
 

Noun edit

ave f (plural aves)

  1. bird
    Synonym: pássaro
    Todas as aves têm asas.
    All birds have wings.
Descendants edit
  • Kabuverdianu: avi

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Galician-Portuguese ave, from Latin avē (hail).

Pronunciation edit

 
 

  • Hyphenation: a‧ve

Interjection edit

ave!

  1. hail (introduces a formal greeting)
    Synonym: salve
    Ave César!
    Hail Caesar!
  2. Clipping of ave Maria.
Derived terms edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin ave.

Interjection edit

ave

  1. ave (salutation)

References edit

  • ave in Academia Română, Micul dicționar academic, ediția a II-a, Bucharest: Univers Enciclopedic, 2010. →ISBN

Sardinian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈabe/, [ˈäː.β̞ɛ]

Noun edit

ave f (plural aves)

  1. (Nuorese) Alternative form of ae
    Synonyms: achedda, puzone

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Inherited from Old Spanish ave, from Latin avem, from Proto-Italic *awis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éwis.

Noun edit

ave f (plural aves)

  1. bird
    Synonym: (especially small birds) pájaro
  2. (Chile) fowl, poultry
Usage notes edit
  • Feminine nouns beginning with stressed /ˈa/ like this one regularly take the singular articles el and un, usually reserved for masculine nouns.
    el ave, un ave
  • They maintain the usual feminine singular articles la and una if an adjective intervenes between the article and the noun.
  • Ave is also the scientific term, while pájaro is used more in common speech for the smaller birds.
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Old Spanish ave, from Latin avē (hello, hail).

Interjection edit

ave

  1. (used when coming into a house) hello, hail

Etymology 3 edit

From the acronym AVE (Alta Velocidad Española), meaning high-speed train (written mostly all caps).

Noun edit

ave f (plural aves)

  1. (Spain) train
    Cogeremos el ave el día 23 por la tarde.
    We will take the train on the 23rd in the afternoon.

Further reading edit

Tolai edit

Alternative forms edit

  • avet (when not preceding a verb)

Pronoun edit

ave

  1. First-person exclusive plural pronoun: they (many) and I, them (many) and me

Declension edit


Venetian edit

Noun edit

ave

  1. plural of ava