See also: Kini, -kini, kini-, and ki ni

Bikol Central

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Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: ki‧ni
  • IPA(key): /kiˈni/ [kiˈn̪i]

Noun

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kiní

  1. shudder, shake
    Synonym: takig
  2. tremble
    Synonyms: kibig, kubog

Derived terms

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Cebuano

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Etymology 1

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From Western Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *-ni.[1] The initial "k(a/i)-" is a common feature among demonstratives: kiri (this), kana (that), and kadto (that). Related to dinhi (here), kanhi (in former times), nganhi (hither), and anhi (to come), in a similar pattern with other Cebuano demonstrative pronouns. Compare Hiligaynon ini, Malay ini.

Alternative forms

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  • kani
  • nishort form, only used mid-sentence

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /kiˈni/ [kɪˈn̪i]
  • Hyphenation: ki‧ni

Adverb

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kiní

  1. this (near where the speaker and the listener are)
Usage notes
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  • kani is the form most commonly used by speakers, while kini may come off as old-fashioned and literary.
  • In colloquial usage, the nuances of kiri (this near me) and kini (this near us) have become blurred, such that both are used interchangeably.

See also

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Etymology 2

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Compare Waray-Waray kini.

Pronunciation

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IPA(key): /ˈkini/ [ˈki.n̪ɪ]

  • Hyphenation: ki‧ni

Noun

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kini

  1. the live sharksucker (Echeneis naucrates)
    Synonym: kumi

References

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  1. ^ Blust, Robert; Trussel, Stephen; et al. (2023) “*-ni”, in the CLDF dataset from The Austronesian Comparative Dictionary (2010–), →DOI

Hawaiian

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Eastern Polynesian *tini.[1]

Noun

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kini

  1. a multitude

Number

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kini

  1. forty thousand

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from English king.[1]

Noun

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kini

  1. a king, as in cards

Etymology 3

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Borrowed from English kin.[1]

Noun

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kini

  1. kin, relative

Etymology 4

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Borrowed from English gin.[1]

Noun

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kini

  1. gin (alcoholic beverage)

Etymology 5

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Borrowed from English tin.[1]

Noun

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kini

  1. tin
  2. a tin can or pail

Etymology 6

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Possibly borrowed from English tin.[1] However, there is no such term included in online marble glossaries.[2][3][4]

Noun

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kini

  1. the best marble in a game of marbles

Etymology 7

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borrowed from English zinc.[1]

Noun

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kini

  1. zinc

References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 Pukui, Mary Kawena, Elbert, Samuel H. (1986) “kini”, in Hawaiian Dictionary, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, entry at Wehewehe.org here
  2. ^ A Glossary of Marble Players' Terms, http://www.americantoymarbles.com/glossary.htm
  3. ^ Marble Terminology, http://www.dougsmithart.com/wordpress_site2/marble-terminology/
  4. ^ Streetplay.com Marbles Glossary, http://www.streetplay.com/thegames/marbles/marbleglossary.shtml

Iban

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ki.niə]
  • Rhymes: -ni
  • Hyphenation: ki‧ni

Adverb

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kini

  1. (interrogative) to where

Indonesian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Malay kini. (This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈkini/
  • Rhymes: -ni
  • Hyphenation: ki‧ni

Adjective

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kini

  1. current, present
    Synonym: sekarang

Adverb

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kini

  1. now, today

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Jamamadí

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Adjective

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kini

  1. (Banawá) green

References

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Japanese

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Romanization

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kini

  1. Rōmaji transcription of きに

Javanese

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Etymology

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Clipping of kien ki

Determiner

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kini

  1. (Cirebon) this, these

Malay

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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kini (Jawi spelling کيني)

  1. present, current
    masa kini
    the present time

Adverb

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kini (Jawi spelling کيني)

  1. now, today
    kini terdapat di kedai yang berdekatan
    now available in your nearest store

Synonyms

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Further reading

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Maori

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Polynesian *kini. Compare Hawaiian ʻiniki (to pinch, to nip; to be sharp and piercing, intransitive), ʻiniʻini (to pinch, transitive).

Verb

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kini

  1. to pinch, to nip
  2. to pinch off
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from English guinea.

Noun

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kini

  1. guinea (a coin)

References

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  • kini” in John C. Moorfield, Te Aka: Maori–English, English–Maori Dictionary and Index, 3rd edition, Longman/Pearson Education New Zealand, 2011, →ISBN.

Naga Pidgin

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Etymology

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Derived from Assamese কিনা (kina).

Verb

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kini

  1. buy

To'abaita

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Noun

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kini

  1. woman

References

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  • Frantisek Lichtenberk, A Grammar of Toqabaqita

Yoruba

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Etymology

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From (to greet) +‎ ẹni (a person)

Pronunciation

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Verb

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kíni

  1. to greet someone

Derived terms

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