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See also: NIA, nía, nĩa, niā, nią, -nia, and ni'a

Contents

AbenakiEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Penobscot nis (I).

PronounEdit

nia

  1. I (the singular first person pronoun)

ReferencesEdit

  • Joseph Laurent, New Familiar Abenakis and English Dialogues (1884)
  • John Dyneley Prince, The Differentiation Between the Penobscot and the Canadian Abenaki Dialects, in the American Anthropologist, volume 4 (1902)

EsperantoEdit

DeterminerEdit

nia (plural niaj, accusative singular nian, accusative plural niajn)

  1. our

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

nia

  1. third-person singular past historic of nier

AnagramsEdit


IdoEdit

PronounEdit

nia

  1. our

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish nïa, from Primitive Irish ᚅᚔᚑᚈᚈᚐ (niotta, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *neɸūss (compare Welsh nai), from Proto-Indo-European *népōts. Cognates include Sanskrit नपात् (nápāt), Old Persian 𐎴𐎱𐎠 (napā), Ancient Greek ἀνεψιός (anepsiós), Latin nepos, and Old English nefa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nia m (genitive singular nia, nominative plural nianna)

  1. nephew

Coordinate termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • "nia" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • 2 nia, niae” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

LadinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

nia

  1. no, not (after a negative) any

AdverbEdit

nia

  1. nothing, anything
  2. at all

MachiguengaEdit

NounEdit

nia

  1. water
    • 1999, Bibliografía peruana, page 140:
      Ogari nia onti pairo okametiti = El agua es muy buena : libro n.o 7; machiguenga con traducción al castellano.

ReferencesEdit

  • Pueblos del Perú (2006)

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Primitive Irish ᚅᚔᚑᚈᚈᚐ (niotta, genitive), from Proto-Celtic *neɸūss (compare Welsh nai), from Proto-Indo-European *népōts. Cognates include Sanskrit नपात् (nápāt), Old Persian 𐎴𐎱𐎠 (napā), Ancient Greek ἀνεψιός (anepsiós), Latin nepos, and Old English nefa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nïa m (genitive nïad or nïeth, nominative plural nïaid)

  1. nephew, sister’s son

InflectionEdit

Masculine d-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative
Vocative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
nïa
also nnïa after a proclitic
nïa
pronounced with /n(ʲ)-/
nïa
also nnïa after a proclitic
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • 2 nia, niae” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

PenobscotEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Abenaki nis (I).

PronounEdit

nia

  1. I (the singular first person pronoun)

ReferencesEdit

  • 1902, J. Dyneley Prince, The Differentiation Between the Penobscot and the Canadian Abenaki Dialects, in the American Anthropologist, volume 4
  • 1918, Frank G. Speck, Newell Lion, Penobscot Transformer Tales, in the International Journal of American Linguistics, volume 1, number 3 (August 1918)

SukiEdit

NounEdit

nia

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • Stephen Adolphe Wurm, Donald C. Laycock, Pacific linguistic studies in honour of Arthur Capell (1970), page 1260: The Suki word for water, nia, has certainly been borrowed from languages in the Mai Kussa-Pahoturi area (Warubi, Mikud, Agob) where it is widespread. From suki it will have found its way into Zimakani (neia).

SwahiliEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic نِيَّة (niyya).

NounEdit

nia (n class, plural nia)

  1. intention

SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the digit nio (nine)

NounEdit

nia c

  1. nine; the digit "9"
  2. ninth-grader; pupil in the ninth and last year of compulsory school
  3. a class of ninth-graders
  4. (uncountable, mainly used in the definite) the ninth year in school
    De barnen går i nian.
    Those children are in ninth grade.
  5. a person who finish a competition as number nine
DeclensionEdit
Declension of nia 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative nia nian nior niorna
Genitive nias nians niors niornas
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From ni (you) +‎ -a, a common way of forming verbs in Swedish. First attested in 1731.[1]

VerbEdit

nia

  1. to address someone with ni (rather than du) as a sign of respect or deference
Usage notesEdit

The term nia has varied considerably over time and location. After the 1960s and 1970s, the word du has in Sweden been used almost exclusively as second person personal pronoun, with a slight change in the late 1990s and early 2000s, when, for example, staff in restaurants and shops began to use ni towards the customers. Before the 1960s, however, there was a difference in use between Sweden and Finland: in both cases du was mainly used within family, among close friends, and when speaking to children. In Sweden, people with higher social statuses usually were addressed with surname and/or title, or if those were unknown, by reconstructing the sentence to use the passive voice or by using herr (Mr.), fru (Mrs.), or fröken (Miss), whereas people with lower statuses were addressed using ni. In Finland, the difference in status was not as commonly taken into account, and instead ni was used as the polite choice of pronoun regardless of social status.

AntonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


TimucuaEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Tawasa néăh (woman).

NounEdit

nia

  1. woman

ReferencesEdit

  • Julian Granberry, A Grammar and Dictionary of the Timucua Language (1993, ISBN 0817307044