See also: Ost, OST, ôt, öst, øst, osť, -ost, and -osť

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

ost (plural osts)

  1. Alternative form of oast

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for ost in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Danish oost, Old Norse ostr, from Proto-Germanic *jūstaz, *justaz.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈost/, [ˈɔ̝sd̥], [ˈɔ̽st]

NounEdit

ost c (singular definite osten, plural indefinite oste)

  1. cheese
InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle Low German ōst (east), from Proto-Germanic *austrą. Cognate of Danish øster, Danish øst.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ost

  1. (obsolete) east

NounEdit

ost

  1. (obsolete) east
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ost

  1. past participle of ose

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

ost (genitive ostu, partitive ostu)

  1. purchase

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ost

  1. accusative singular of ostur

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French ost, from Old French ost, host, from Latin hostis. An archaic or literary term referring to an army from the Middle Ages, taken from Middle French (i.e. no longer reflecting a popularly inherited form). The modern pronunciation is based on the spelling, differing from the original one, which was /o/. Has survived as an inherited form in the dialects of the Picardy and Maine regions as o (herd).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɔst/
  • (file)

NounEdit

ost m (plural osts)

  1. (archaic, literary) host, army

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

NounEdit

ost

  1. indefinite accusative singular of ostur

LatvianEdit

 
Ost vīnu

EtymologyEdit

From *uosti, from Proto-Baltic *uod-ti, from *ōd-, from Proto-Indo-European *od-, *h₃ed-, *h₃ed- (to smell). Cognates include Lithuanian úosti, Old Czech jadati (to explore, to investigate), Ancient Greek ὄζω (ózō, to smell), Latin odōr (smell), Albanian amë (unpleasant smell).[1]

PronunciationEdit

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VerbEdit

ost (tr. or intr., 1st conj., pres. ožu, od, , past odu)

  1. to smell (to perceive an odor)
    ost cepetito smell roast(ed meat)
    ost vīnuto smell the wine
    ost spirta smakuto smell the odor of alcohol
    strādājot virtuvē, visu laiku redzot, ožot ēdienu, it kā ēstgribas vairs navworking in a kitchen, seeing and smelling food all the time, it is as if one no longer had (= could feel) the desire to eat
  2. to smell, to sniff (to inhale air through the nose, usually several times, in order to try to perceive a smell)
    ost ēterito smell ether
    ožamais spirtssmelling salts, hartshorn (lit. smellable alcohol)
    divi cilvēki, piebāzuši pirkstu galus pie deguna, steidzīgi oda kaut ko baltu kā lauku vecenes šņaucamo tabakutwo people, bringing the tips of their fingers to their noses, quickly smelled something white, like old women snuffing tobacco in the countryside
  3. (figuratively, colloquial) to smell (to sense, to find out)
    saimnieks jau dabūjis ost, ka tu citu vietu meklējotiesthe landowner has already managed to smell that you are looking for another place
  4. to smell, to stink (to have, to spread a bad, unpleasant smell)
    te pēc benzīnait smells like gasoline here
    ost pēc ķiplokiem, siļķēm, alusto smell like garlic, herring, beer
  5. to smell (to have, to spread a pleasant odor)
    ost pēc odekolonato smell like eau-de-cologne
    puķe jauki the flower smells nice
    nokāpj gravā; pēc valgmes un pērnajām lapāmhe goes down the ravine; (there) it smells like dampness and last year's leaves
  6. (figuratively, colloquial) to smell (to suggest, make think of something, usually unpleasant)
    tas jau oda pēc fašismathat smelled like fascism

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

prefixed verbs:
other derived terms:

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “ost”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, →ISBN

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ost, from Latin hostis.

NounEdit

ost m or f (plural osts)

  1. army

DescendantsEdit

  • French: ost

ReferencesEdit

  • ost on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ostr.

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /ust/

NounEdit

ost m (definite singular osten, indefinite plural oster, definite plural ostene)

  1. cheese

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ostr.

NounEdit

ost m (definite singular osten, indefinite plural ostar, definite plural ostane)

  1. cheese

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *ōstaz. Cognate with Middle Low German ōst, Dutch oest (knot, tree-stump). Related with Proto-Germanic *astaz (branch), whence Old High German ast (German Ast), Gothic 𐌰𐍃𐍄𐍃 (asts).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ōst m

  1. knot in a tree

DeclensionEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin hostis, hostem.

NounEdit

ost m or f

  1. army (armed military force)

Usage notesEdit

  • Has a regular declension as both a masculine and a feminine noun
    nominative singular oz, oblique plural oz, nominative plural ost when masculine
    nominative singular ost, oblique plural oz, nominative plural oz when feminine
  • see Appendix:Old French nouns

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle French: ost
    • French: ost (archaic)

PapiamentuEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch oost.

AdjectiveEdit

ost

  1. east

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Germanic language.

NounEdit

ost m (plural osts)

  1. east

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SloveneEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from oster.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ọ̑st f

  1. sharp tip

InflectionEdit

Feminine, i-stem, mobile accent
nom. sing. óst
gen. sing. ostí
singular dual plural
nominative óst ostí ostí
accusative óst ostí ostí
genitive ostí ostí ostí
dative ôsti ostéma ostém
locative ôsti ostéh ostéh
instrumental ostjó ostéma ostmí

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish oster, from Old Norse ostr, from Proto-Germanic *justaz, from Proto-Indo-European *yaus-, *yūs-.

NounEdit

ost c

  1. cheese
DeclensionEdit
Declension of ost 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative ost osten ostar ostarna
Genitive osts ostens ostars ostarnas
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

ost (not comparable)

  1. east
    Kotka ligger ost om Helsingfors.
    Kotka lies east of Helsinki.

NounEdit

ost c (uncountable)

  1. east
Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • (compass points) vädersträck;
nordväst norr
nord
nordost
nordöst
väster
väst
  öster
öst
ost
sydväst söder
syd
sydost
sydöst

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


Tocharian BEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tocharian *wɔstä, maybe from Proto-Indo-European *weh₂s-tu-; compare Ancient Greek ἄστυ (ástu, town) and Sanskrit वास्तु (vāstu). Compare Tocharian A waṣt.

NounEdit

ost m (gen. s. ostantse, obl. s. ost, nom. pl. ostwa)

  1. house

Usage notesEdit

Often found in the phrases ostmeṃ lät- (lit. “leave home”), meaning “to become a (Buddhist) monk”, and ostmeṃ ltu, “Buddhist monk”. This term reflects the Sanskrit equivalent प्रव्रज्य​ (pravrajya​, go forth). Note that a similar expression, probably a calque, is also found in Chinese 出家 (renounce the family to become a Buddhist monk or nun).


VilamovianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ost m

  1. bough, branch