See also: SOFA, Sofa, sofá, sofà, sófa, and sofā

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia
 
A firm sofa
 
A soft sofa
 
A modern-style sofa

EtymologyEdit

 sofa on Wikipedia

Borrowed from French sofa, ultimately from Arabic صُفَّة(ṣuffa, a long seat made of stone or brick) or Aramaic צפא‎/ܨܦܬܐ. Cognate with or derived from Aramaic צפא‎/ܨܦܬܐ (ṣipā’, ṣeppəṯā, “mat, matting”). The word may have entered European languages via Turkish or through the Moorish occupation of Iberia.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sofa (plural sofas)

  1. (Middle East architecture, archaic) A raised area of a building's floor, usually covered with carpeting, used for sitting.
  2. (furniture) An upholstered seat with a raised back and one or two raised ends, long enough to comfortably accommodate two or more people.
    • 1930, Norman Lindsay, Redheap, Sydney: Ure Smith, published 1965, page 228:
      His eyes trailed over her feline pose on the sofa, finding her limbs adorable while he tried exasperatedly to extract the truth of licentious revelations from them.

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

sofa (third-person singular simple present sofas, present participle sofaing, simple past and past participle sofaed)

  1. To furnish with one or more sofas.
    • 1852, Charles Astor Bristed, Five years in an English university, page 14:
      The appearance of a student's apartment, though by no means splendid, is decidedly comfortable ; it is well cushioned and sofaed, with a proper proportion of arm chairs, and a general air of respectability — much better on the whole than our student's rooms ever are.
    • 1890, Stanley Lane-Poole, The Life of Lord Stratford de Redcliffe - Volume 1, page 100:
      First, it will surprize you to learn that instead of the venerable simplicity which reigns in St. Stephen's chapel, the H. of Representatives, besides being stoved, carpeted, desked, and sofaed in the most luxurious style, rivals and indeed surpasses the Legislature of Paris in decoration and drapery.
    • 1893, Henry Swinglehurst, Silver Mines and Incidents of Travel, page 97:
      I and another therefore entirely occupied our stateroom, which was sofaed round, being just large enough for two to lie down and a third to sit with his feet up and his head on his knees.
    • 1981, David A. Kaufelt, The Wine and the Music, page 331:
      It was a lavish, fully draped, fully sofaed, fully radiator-covered nineteenth-century deluxe German hotel suite.
  2. To seat or lay down on a sofa.
    • 1895, Denver Medical Times - Volume 5, page 191:
      Cliques of three or more are formed, each member of which goes in search of victims, and the first female found complaining of pain in the lower part of her back, is immediately run down, corralled, cornered, so to speak, and sans ceremonie she is at once tabled, sofaed or beded, or in the absence of these relics of refinement she is floored or she may have to submit standing (especially if the doctor is in a hury and meets her at the gate or corner drug store) with an unerring plunge, of a not overly clean index finger, the darksome cavern is penetrated and perhaps, not, a cervix is touched and reveals, of course, a lacerated cervix, just as had been predicted.
    • 1929, Benjamin Disraeli, Lawrence John Lumley Dundas Marquis of Zetland, 1876 to 1881, page 387:
      A few, feeble words—my first—to tell you I have left my room this morning and am shaven and shorn and dressed and sofaed in my writing room, after a terrible ten days or more.
    • 2006, Kim Akass, Janet McCabe, Reading 'Desperate Housewives': Beyond the White Picket Fence:
      Many a time back in my boozing days when I was sofaed too.

ReferencesEdit

  • "sofa, n.", in the Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

NounEdit

sofa c (singular definite sofaen, plural indefinite sofaer)

  1. sofa, couch, divan, settee

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French sofa, perhaps via Turkish sofa, ultimately from Arabic صُفَّة(ṣuffa).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsoː.faː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: so‧fa

NounEdit

sofa m (plural sofa's, diminutive sofaatje n)

  1. (chiefly Belgium) A couch, a sofa.
    Synonyms: bank, zitbank

FrenchEdit

 
sofa

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Arabic صُفَّة(ṣuffa, a long seat made of stone or brick), from Aramaic צפא(ṣipā’, mat)/Classical Syriac ܨܦܬܐ‎. The word may have entered French via Turkish sofa.

Note casually that Arabic itself uses كَنَبة(kanaba) for “sofa”, from French canapé.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sofa m (plural sofas)

  1. couch; sofa

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sofa, from Proto-Germanic *swefaną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

sofa (strong verb, third-person singular past indicative svaf, third-person plural past indicative sváfum, supine sofið)

  1. (intransitive) to sleep
    Ekki vekja hana, hún er sofandi.
    Don't wake her up, she's sleeping.

ConjugationEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

sofa (plural sofas)

  1. (item of furniture) sofa

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

sofa

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ソファ

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English sofa.

NounEdit

sofa m (plural sofas)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) sofa

SynonymsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

NounEdit

sofa m (definite singular sofaen, indefinite plural sofaer, definite plural sofaene)

  1. sofa, couch

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

sofa m (definite singular sofaen, indefinite plural sofaer or sofaar, definite plural sofaene or sofaane)

  1. a sofa or couch

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From French sofa, from Arabic صُفَّة(ṣuffa, a long seat made of stone or brick), from Aramaic צפא(ṣipā’, mat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sofa f (diminutive sofka)

  1. sofa, couch

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • sofa in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • sofa in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

sòfa f (Cyrillic spelling со̀фа)

  1. (Serbia) sofa

DeclensionEdit


VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Russian софа́ (sofá).

NounEdit

sofa

  1. sofa

InflectionEdit

Inflection of sofa
nominative sing. sofa
genitive sing. sofan
partitive sing. sofad
partitive plur. sofid
singular plural
nominative sofa sofad
accusative sofan sofad
genitive sofan sofiden
partitive sofad sofid
essive-instructive sofan sofin
translative sofaks sofikš
inessive sofas sofiš
elative sofaspäi sofišpäi
illative ? sofihe
adessive sofal sofil
ablative sofalpäi sofilpäi
allative sofale sofile
abessive sofata sofita
comitative sofanke sofidenke
prolative sofadme sofidme
approximative I sofanno sofidenno
approximative II sofannoks sofidennoks
egressive sofannopäi sofidennopäi
terminative I ? sofihesai
terminative II sofalesai sofilesai
terminative III sofassai
additive I ? sofihepäi
additive II sofalepäi sofilepäi

ReferencesEdit

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I., “тахта”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary]‎[1], Petrozavodsk: Periodika, 2007