See also: Hol, hól, hòl, hol., hol-, hol', hôľ, høl, and höl

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch hol, from Middle Dutch hol, from Old Dutch *hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hol (plural holle, diminutive holletjie)

  1. A hole, a hollow, a cavity.

AdjectiveEdit

hol (attributive hol, comparative holler, superlative holste)

  1. hollow

Alemannic GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulaz. Cognate with German hohl, Dutch hol, Saterland Frisian hol, English hollow, Icelandic holur, Westrobothnian hȯhl.

AdjectiveEdit

hol

  1. (Uri) hollow

ReferencesEdit


BouyeiEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hol

  1. garlic

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hol

  1. second-person singular imperative of holit

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɦɔl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hol
  • Rhymes: -ɔl

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch hol, from Old Dutch *hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulą.

NounEdit

hol n (plural holen, diminutive holletje n)

  1. A hole, hollow, cavity
  2. (nautical) A cargo hold
  3. (vulgar) An anus, arsehole; both anatomical senses of butt
    Je hol zul je zelf moeten schoonmaken.
    You'll have to clean up your arse yourself.
  4. (by extension) Any other bodily cavity that resembles a hole
  5. An artificial opening such as a slit
  6. burrow (a hole or tunnel dug by a small animal, like a rabbit, used as a dwelling)
  7. (figuratively) An unsanitary and/or unpleasant place; shithole
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: hol

AdjectiveEdit

hol (comparative holler, superlative holst)

  1. hollow, having an empty space inside
InflectionEdit
Inflection of hol
uninflected hol
inflected holle
comparative holler
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial hol holler het holst
het holste
indefinite m./f. sing. holle hollere holste
n. sing. hol holler holste
plural holle hollere holste
definite holle hollere holste
partitive hols hollers
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Deverbal from hollen.

NounEdit

hol m (plural hollen, diminutive holletje n)

  1. A run, the action running
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown, perhaps cognate with English hill. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

NounEdit

hol f (plural hollen, diminutive holletje n)

  1. A small height in the landscape, such as
    1. a hill (like the Utrecht city wall ruins)
    2. a sloping road (as in Rotterdam)

Etymology 4Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

hol

  1. first-person singular present indicative of hollen
  2. imperative of hollen

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulą, noun-derivation from *hulaz (hollow), from Proto-Indo-European *kuH-, *kewH- (hollow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hol n (genitive singular hols, plural hol)

  1. hole
  2. cave
  3. (dentistry) cavity

DeclensionEdit

Declension of hol
n3 singular plural
indefinite definite indefinite definite
nominative hol holið hol holini
accusative hol holið hol holini
dative holi holinum holum holunum
genitive hols holsins hola holanna

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Uralic *ku.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

hol

  1. now... now, sometimes... sometimes, either... or
    Hol itt, hol ott bukkant ki egy delfin a vízből.Sometimes here, sometimes there, a dolphin would pop out of the water.
    Mindig van valami: hol áramszünet, hol csőtörés.There's always something: either it's a blackout or a burst pipe.
    Hol volt, hol nem volt, volt egyszer egy király.Once upon a time there was a king. (literally: now there was, now there wasn't)

AdverbEdit

hol

  1. (interrogative) where?
    Synonym: merre? (see also its Usage notes)
    • 1825, Mihály Vörösmarty, Zalán futása,[1] canto 1, lines 5–6, translation by Watson Kirkconnell and Adam Makkai:
      Hol vagyon, aki merész ajakát hadi dalnak eresztvén, / A riadó vak mélységet fölverje szavával, []
      Where is the one who, with lips all bold, could thunder a war-song / rousing the gloom of the deep and unsighty abysses, []

Derived termsEdit

Compound words

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulaz (hollow).

AdjectiveEdit

hol

  1. hollow, empty
  2. concave, sunken
  3. holey (full of holes)
Alternative formsEdit
DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

hol

  1. Alternative form of hole (whole)

NounEdit

hol

  1. Alternative form of hole (whole)

AdverbEdit

hol

  1. Alternative form of hole (wholly)

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

hol (plural hols)

  1. Alternative form of hole (hole)

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

hol (plural hols)

  1. Alternative form of hole (hull)

Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hulą (hollow space, cavity) noun derivative of Proto-Germanic *hulaz (hollow).

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hol n

  1. a hole, a hollow
    • 1921, Joseph Bosworth & Thomas Northcote Toller, An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, German Lexicon Project.
      Mec hæleþ ūt tȳhþ of hole hātne.(please add an English translation of this quote)
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hōlą (vain speech, slander, calumny), from Proto-Indo-European *kēl-, *ḱēl- (invocation; to beguile, feign, charm, cajole, deceive).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hōl n

  1. calumny; slander
    • 1921, Joseph Bosworth & Thomas Northcote Toller, An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, German Lexicon Project.
      Ðæs dēopne āþ Drihten āswōr and ðone mid sōðe swylce gefrymede ðæt hē hine for hōle ǣr ne āswōre gehēt Dauide swā hē him dyde syððan.(please add an English translation of this quote)
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hulaz, whence also Old English hol, Old Norse holr.

AdjectiveEdit

hol

  1. hollow

NounEdit

hol n

  1. hollow

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle High German: hol

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

IPA(key): /xɔl/

Etymology 1Edit

From English hall.

NounEdit

hol m inan (diminutive holik)

  1. hall, hallway
  2. lobby
  3. vestibule, anteroom

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

(lobby):

(vestibule):

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Back-formation from holować,[1] from German holen.[2]

NounEdit

hol m inan

  1. haul, tow

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Saterland FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian hol, from Proto-Germanic *hulaz. More at hollow.

AdjectiveEdit

hol

  1. hollow

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English hall.

NounEdit

hol

  1. hall

SynonymsEdit


UzbekEdit

Other scripts
Cyrillic ҳол
Roman hol
Perso-Arabic ‍‍

NounEdit

hol (plural hollar)

  1. (grammar) adverb