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CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 n

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 m (plural cés)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈt͡seː]
  • (file)

NounEdit

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

DeclensionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


IcelandicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 n (genitive singular cés, nominative plural )

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter C.

DeclensionEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish cía, from Proto-Celtic *kʷēs (from which also Welsh pwy), from Proto-Indo-European *kʷis.

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

(triggers h-prothesis of a following disjunctive pronoun é, í, iad; followed by a relative clause)

  1. (interrogative) who?
    hé?
    Who is he?
    hí an bhean sin?
    Who is that woman?
    a dhéanfaidh é?
    Who will do it?
Usage notesEdit

Can be followed by a prepositional pronoun in the 3rd person singular masculine:

  • aige an fíon?
    Who has the wine?
  • dó ar thug tú é?
    Who did you give it to?

In this construction, it can also mean ‘what’:

  • air a bhfuil an leabhar?
    What is the book on?
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish cía (although).

ParticleEdit

  1. Only used in cé go, cé gur, cé nach, and cé nár

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman kay, cail (modern French quai), from Gaulish cagiíum (enclosure), from Proto-Celtic *kagyom (pen, enclosure) (from which also Welsh cae (hedge)).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

 f (genitive singular , nominative plural céanna)

  1. quay, wharf, pier
DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
ché gcé
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit