Character ó
Unicode name LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH ACUTE
Unicode block Latin-1 Supplement
Codepoint U+00F3

Contents

TranslingualEdit

LetterEdit

ó lower case (upper case Ó)

  1. The letter o with an acute accent.

See alsoEdit


CzechEdit

LetterEdit

ó ‎(lower case, upper case Ó)

  1. The 24th letter of the Czech alphabet, after o and before p.

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

ó ‎(upper case Ó)

  1. The eighteenth letter of the Faroese alphabet, called ó and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From contraction of preposition a ‎(to, towards) + masculine definite article o ‎(the)

ContractionEdit

ó m sg

  1. Alternative spelling of ao

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Uralic *oma ‎(old, previous).[1] Cognate with Finnish ammoin ‎(very long ago), Estonian ammu ‎(once upon a time, long ago), Northern Sami oames ‎(past, old), and Erzya умок ‎(umok, a long time ago).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ó (comparative óbb, superlative legóbb)

  1. old, ancient (especially used in compound words, such as ókor 'antiquity')
  2. in previous

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

(Compound words):

InterjectionEdit

ó

  1. oh!
    Ó, értem már!
    Oh, I understand now!

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

ó

  1. (archaic) to protect, to guard

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Álgu etymological database, entry #79941 (language: Proto-Uralic, word: oma)

IcelandicEdit

InterjectionEdit

ó!

  1. oh!, ah!
    Ó ókei, gangi þér vel.
    Oh ok, good luck.
  2. O, oh, the Icelandic vocative particle, used before a pronoun or the name of a person or persons to mark direct address
    Ó, góðu menn! Heyr mín orð.
    O good men! Heed my words.
    • Lofsöngur:
      Ó, guð vors lands.
      Oh, our country's God.

See alsoEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • ua (archaic)

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From ua, from Old Irish úa ‎(grandson, descendant).

NounEdit

ó m ‎(genitive ó, nominative plural óí, genitive in surnames , nominative plural in historical sept names )

  1. (archaic) grandson, grandchild; descendant
DeclensionEdit
Forms in surnames and sept names
Case Singular Plural
Nominative ó
Genitive ó
Dative ó uíbh

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish ó, úa.

PrepositionEdit

ó ‎(plus dative, triggers lenition)

  1. of, from (indicating origin)
    ó ghleann go gleann‎ ― from glen to glen
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Irish úa, from Proto-Celtic *awa, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew ‎(away).

ConjunctionEdit

ó (triggers lenition)

  1. since (temporal)
    ó chuala mé an scéala‎ ― since I heard the news
  2. after
    bliain ó rugadh é‎ ― a year after he was born
  3. from the time when
    ó bhaintear an féar go bhfuil sé tirim‎ ― from the time the hay is cut until it is dry
  4. once
    ó bhrisfear é‎ ― once it is broken
  5. since (causal), inasmuch as
    ó tá mé liom féin‎ ― since I am alone
Derived termsEdit
  • ós ‎(since it is)

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ó n-ó t-ó
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  • "ó" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • úa, óa, ó” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • 1 ó” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

ó (Zhuyin ㄛˊ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of

Middle IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish au, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ows-; cognate with English ear and Latin auris.

NounEdit

ó n

  1. (archaic, poetic, anatomy) ear
  2. some part of a cloak
  3. some part of a shield, possibly a spike or boss
  4. some part of a chessboard, possibly rings or handles for lifting
  5. some part of a pitcher or vessel for liquor, possibly a curved, earlike handle

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

ConjunctionEdit

ó

  1. since

PrepositionEdit

ó

  1. Alternative form of úa
    ó thurcbáil co fuinud‎ ― from sunrise to sunset

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

LetterEdit

ó ‎(lower case, upper case Ó)

  1. The letter o with an acute accent
    • 2003, Lya Wyler (translator), J. K. Rowling (English author), Harry Potter e a Ordem da Fênix (Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix), Rocco, page 294:
      [] o único professor presente quando entraram [na sala de aula] era Binns, [...] preparando-se para continuar sua monótona lengalenga sobre a guerra dos gigantes.
      [...] the only present teacher when they entered [the classroom] was Binns, [...] preparing to continue his monotonous explanation about the giants' war.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

ó m (plural ós)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter O/o.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Alternative formsEdit

InterjectionEdit

ó

  1. o; hey (vocative particle)
    Ó Senhor, dai-me forças!
    O Lord, give me strength.

Etymology 4Edit

First syllable of olha or olhe.

InterjectionEdit

ó

  1. (colloquial) look!

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ó

  1. Obsolete spelling of o

Usage notesEdit

In many texts dating back to the pre-reform period use ó in place of o for all uses. Through the 20th century, it continued to see regular use near numerals to avoid confusion with a zero: 2 ó 3. All such uses are now considered nonstandard.


TaosEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ó ‎(basic stem form)

  1. wash

Related termsEdit


TetumEdit

PronounEdit

ó

  1. you

Upper SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

ó ‎(lower case, upper case Ó)

  1. The twenty-third letter of the Upper Sorbian alphabet, called ó and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

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