ó U+00F3, ó
LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH ACUTE
Composition:o [U+006F] + ◌́ [U+0301]
ò
[U+00F2]
Latin-1 Supplement ô
[U+00F4]

TranslingualEdit

LetterEdit

ó (upper case Ó)

  1. The letter o with an acute accent.

See alsoEdit


CzechEdit

LetterEdit

ó (lower case, upper case Ó)

  1. The 24th letter of the Czech alphabet, after o and before p.

InterjectionEdit

ó

  1. oh

FaroeseEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

ó (upper case Ó)

  1. The eighteenth letter of the Faroese alphabet, called ó and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From contraction of preposition a (to, towards) + masculine definite article o (the)

ContractionEdit

ó m sg

  1. Alternative spelling of ao

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ ˈoː]
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -oː

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Uralic *oma (old, previous).[1] Cognate with Finnish ammoin (very long ago), Estonian ammu (once upon a time, long ago), Northern Sami oames (past, old), and Erzya умок (umok, a long time ago). Compare agg (aged), avas (rancid), avul (to become obsolete), avítt (antiquated).

AdjectiveEdit

ó (comparative óbb, superlative legóbb)

  1. (archaic) old, ancient (especially used in compound words, such as ókor 'antiquity')
    Synonyms: antik, ódon, régi, ősi
    Antonyms: mai, új
    Coordinate terms: ős, közép, új (as prefixes indicating historical periods)
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative ó ók
accusative ót ókat
dative ónak óknak
instrumental óval ókkal
causal-final óért ókért
translative óvá ókká
terminative óig ókig
essive-formal óként ókként
essive-modal
inessive óban ókban
superessive ón ókon
adessive ónál óknál
illative óba ókba
sublative óra ókra
allative óhoz ókhoz
elative óból ókból
delative óról ókról
ablative ótól óktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
óé óké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
óéi ókéi
Derived termsEdit
Compound words, excluding peoples and languages
Compound names for peoples and languages

Etymology 2Edit

An onomatopoeia.[2]

InterjectionEdit

ó

  1. oh!
    Synonyms: óh, jaj, ja, juj,
    Ó, értem már!Oh, I understand now!

See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See óv.

VerbEdit

ó

  1. (archaic) Alternative form of óv, to protect, to guard.
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

LetterEdit

ó (lower case, upper case Ó)

  1. The twenty-fifth letter of the Hungarian alphabet, called ó and written in the Latin script.
  2. Abbreviation of óra (hour[s], o'clock).
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative ó ó-k
accusative ó-t ó-kat
dative ó-nak ó-knak
instrumental ó-val ó-kkal
causal-final ó-ért ó-kért
translative ó-vá ó-kká
terminative ó-ig ó-kig
essive-formal ó-ként ó-kként
essive-modal
inessive ó-ban ó-kban
superessive ó-n ó-kon
adessive ó-nál ó-knál
illative ó-ba ó-kba
sublative ó-ra ó-kra
allative ó-hoz ó-khoz
elative ó-ból ó-kból
delative ó-ról ó-król
ablative ó-tól ó-któl
non-attributive
possessive - singular
ó-é ó-ké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
ó-éi ó-kéi
Possessive forms of ó
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. ó-m ó-im
2nd person sing. ó-d ó-id
3rd person sing. ó-ja ó-i
1st person plural ó-nk ó-ink
2nd person plural ó-tok ó-itok
3rd person plural ó-juk ó-ik

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Álgu etymological database, entry #79941 (language: Proto-Uralic, word: oma)
  2. ^ Zaicz, Gábor. Etimológiai szótár: Magyar szavak és toldalékok eredete (’Dictionary of Etymology: The origin of Hungarian words and affixes’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2006, →ISBN

Further readingEdit

  • (ancient, antique): ó in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • (interjection): ó in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • (to protect): ó in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • (sound, letter, and abbreviation): ó in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

ó (upper case Ó)

  1. The nineteenth letter of the Icelandic alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit

InterjectionEdit

ó!

  1. oh!, ah!
    Ó ókei, gangi þér vel.
    Oh ok, good luck.
  2. O, oh, the Icelandic vocative particle, used before a pronoun or the name of a person or persons to mark direct address
    Ó, góðu menn! Heyr mín orð.
    O good men! Heed my words.
    • Lofsöngur:
      Ó, guð vors lands.
      Oh, our country's God.

See alsoEdit


IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From ua, from Old Irish úa (grandson, descendant).

Alternative formsEdit

  • ua (archaic)

NounEdit

ó m (genitive ó, nominative plural óí, genitive in surnames , nominative plural in historical sept names )

  1. (archaic) grandson, grandchild
    Synonym: garmhac
  2. (archaic) descendant
DeclensionEdit
Forms in surnames and sept names

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish ó, úa, from Proto-Celtic *aw, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ew (away).

PrepositionEdit

ó (plus dative, triggers lenition)

  1. of, from (indicating origin)
    ó ghleann go gleannfrom glen to glen
  2. used in conjunction with the verb to indicate need/want
    Tá bainne uaim.
    I need milk.
InflectionEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ó (triggers lenition)

  1. since (temporal)
    ó chuala mé an scéalasince I heard the news
  2. after
    bliain ó rugadh éa year after he was born
  3. from the time when
    ó bhaintear an féar go bhfuil sé tirimfrom the time the hay is cut until it is dry
  4. once
    ó bhrisfear éonce it is broken
  5. since (causal), inasmuch as
    ó tá mé liom féinsince I am alone
Derived termsEdit
  • ós (since it is)

Etymology 3Edit

Basically onomatopoeic, but compare English O, Latin ō, Ancient Greek (ô), etc.

InterjectionEdit

ó

  1. oh

ParticleEdit

ó

  1. O (vocative particle)
    • 1939, Peig Sayers, “Inghean an Cheannaidhe”, printed in Marie-Louise Sjoestedt, Description d’un parler irlandais de Kerry, Bibliothèque de l'École des Hautes Études 270. Paris: Librairie Honoré Champion, p. 194:
      Ní dubhairt an mháthair seóid ach : « Tá go maith, a inghean ó ».
      The mother said nothing at all but, “That is well, daughter.”
Usage notesEdit

Generally used postpositively, i.e. after the noun referring to the person addressed. The particle a is used before the noun.

  • a mhuirnín óO darling

Usage notesEdit

This optional particle is placed after the vocative, which is obligatorily preceded by the vocative particle a, thus a mhic or a mhic ó (O son, my son!).

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ó n-ó t-ó
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

ó (Zhuyin ㄛˊ)

  1. Pinyin transcription of

Middle IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Irish áu, from Proto-Celtic *ausos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ṓws; cognate with English ear and Latin auris.

NounEdit

ó n

  1. (archaic, poetic, anatomy) ear
  2. some part of a cloak
  3. some part of a shield, possibly a spike or boss
  4. some part of a chessboard, possibly rings or handles for lifting
  5. some part of a pitcher or vessel for liquor, possibly a curved, earlike handle

MutationEdit

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ó unchanged n-ó
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish úa.

PrepositionEdit

ó (with dative, triggers lenition)

  1. from, of
  2. by
DescendantsEdit
  • Irish: ó
  • Scottish Gaelic: bho
  • Manx: veih, voish

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Contested.

PrepositionEdit

ó (with dative)

  1. from, of
    ó thurcbáil co fuinudfrom sunrise to sunset
  2. by
InflectionEdit

Forms with a definite article:

Forms with a possessive determiner:

  • (h)úam (from my)
  • (h)úat (from your sg)
  • oa, (h)úa, (h)ó (from his/her/its/their)

Forms with a relative particle:

DescendantsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ó

  1. since, after
    • c. 775, Táin Bó Fraích from the Book of Leinster, published in Táin bó Fraích (1974, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited by Wolfgang Meid, line 43
      Ó gabais Ailill ⁊ Medb flaith, nícos·tánic riam ⁊ nícos·ticfa dírimm bas choímiu ná bess áiniu.
      Since Ailill and Medb took power, no multitude has come before, nor will come that was more beautiful or more splendid.
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 22d7
      .i. ho ru·deda ind feúil forsnaib cnamaib, cita·biat iarum in chnamai in fochaid.
      After the flesh on the bones has melted away, the bones then feel the suffering.

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

ó n

  1. Alternative form of áu (ear)

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ó unchanged n-ó
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

LetterEdit

ó (lower case, upper case Ó)

  1. The letter o with an acute accent

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

ó m (plural ós)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter O.
    Synonyms: ô, oh

Etymology 3Edit

InterjectionEdit

ó

  1. (archaic) o; hey (vocative particle)
    Ó Senhor, dai-me forças!
    O Lord, give me strength.
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

First syllable of olha or olhe.

InterjectionEdit

ó

  1. (colloquial) look!

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ó

  1. Obsolete spelling of o

Usage notesEdit

In many texts dating back to the pre-reform period use ó in place of o for all uses. Through the 20th century, it continued to see regular use near numerals to avoid confusion with a zero: 2 ó 3. All such uses are now considered nonstandard.


TaosEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ó (basic stem form)

  1. wash

Related termsEdit


TetumEdit

PronounEdit

ó

  1. you

Upper SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

ó (lower case, upper case Ó)

  1. The twenty-third letter of the Upper Sorbian alphabet, called ó and written in the Latin script.

See alsoEdit


VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(classifier con) ó

  1. buzzard, hawk

See alsoEdit

Derived terms