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See also: mála, malá, màla, malā, måla, mała, and małą

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Latin mala (jaw, cheek).

NounEdit

mala (plural malae)

  1. A single lobe of an insect's maxilla.
  2. The grinding surface of an insect's mandible.

Etymology 2Edit

See malum.

NounEdit

mala

  1. plural of malum

Etymology 3Edit

Borrowed from Sanskrit माला (mālā, wreath, garland, crown).

NounEdit

mala (plural malas or mala)

  1. A bead or a set of beads commonly used by Hindus and Buddhists for keeping count while reciting, chanting, or mentally repeating a mantra or the name or names of a deity.
Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

VerbEdit

mala

  1. to grind

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mala f sg

  1. feminine singular of mal

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • IPA(key): /ˈmala/
  • Hyphenation: mal‧a
  • Rhymes: -ala

AdjectiveEdit

mala (accusative singular malan, plural malaj, accusative plural malajn)

  1. opposite

FaroeseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mala, from Proto-Germanic *malaną.

VerbEdit

mala (third person singular past indicative mól, third person plural past indicative mólu, supine malið)

  1. to grind

ConjugationEdit


GalicianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mala

  1. feminine singular of malo

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mala, from Proto-Germanic *malaną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mala (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative malaði, supine malað)

  1. to grind
    Hættu mala kornið!
    Stop grinding the corn!
  2. to purr
    Oo, hlustiði á köttinn mala.
    Oh, listen to the cat purr.
  3. to blabber, babble, talk

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mala

  1. bad

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay mala, from Pali mala, from Sanskrit मल (mala).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ma.la/
  • Hyphenation: ma‧la

NounEdit

mala

  1. disaster

AdjectiveEdit

mala

  1. withered, faded
  2. (Classical Indonesian) dirty, impurity
  3. diseased

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish mala.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mala f (genitive singular mala, nominative plural malaí)

  1. brow
    1. (anatomy) eyebrow
    2. (geography, of hill) brow; slope, incline

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
mala mhala not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • "mala" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • mala” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

mala f (plural male)

  1. underworld, gangland

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *smakslā, from Proto-Indo-European *smek- (beard) as *smḱ- (beard) +‎ *slo/h₂-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

māla f (genitive mālae); first declension

  1. (anatomy) cheekbone, jaw
  2. cheek
    Tam consimile'st atque ego: sūra, pēs, statūra, tōnsus, oculī, nāsus, vel labra, mālae, mentum, barba, collum - tōtus! (Platus, Amphitryo, Act 1, 443-445)
    He's so similar to me: his calves, feet, height, haircut, eyes, nose, lips, jaw, chin, beard, neck - all of it!
DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative māla mālae
Genitive mālae mālārum
Dative mālae mālīs
Accusative mālam mālās
Ablative mālā mālīs
Vocative māla mālae
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • mala in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mala in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mala in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mala in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • mala in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be broken down by misfortune: in malis iacere
    • (ambiguous) to be hard pressed by misfortune: malis urgeri
    • (ambiguous) to have a good or bad reputation, be spoken well, ill of: bona, mala existimatio est de aliquo
    • (ambiguous) moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • (ambiguous) to take a thing in good (bad) part: in bonam (malam) partem accipere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) a guilty conscience: conscientia mala or peccatorum, culpae, sceleris, delicti
    • (ambiguous) to be tormented by remorse: conscientia mala angi, excruciari
    • (ambiguous) to bless (curse) a person: precari alicui bene (male) or omnia bona (mala), salutem
    • (ambiguous) from beginning to end: ab ovo usque ad mala (proverb.)
  • mala in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Frankish *malha (leather bag).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mala f (genitive malae); first declension

  1. bundle, bag
DeclensionEdit

First declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mala malae
Genitive malae malārum
Dative malae malīs
Accusative malam malās
Ablative malā malīs
Vocative mala malae

DescendantsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

AdjectiveEdit

mala

  1. inflection of malus:
    1. feminine nominative singular
    2. feminine vocative singular
    3. neuter nominative plural
    4. neuter accusative plural
    5. neuter vocative plural

malā

  1. feminine ablative singular of malus

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

mala n pl

  1. inflection of malum:
    1. nominative plural
    2. accusative plural
    3. vocative plural

Etymology 5Edit

NounEdit

māla n pl

  1. inflection of mālum:
    1. nominative plural
    2. accusative plural
    3. vocative plural

LatvianEdit

NounEdit

mala f (4th declension)

  1. edge, shore

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

mala

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of malt
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of malt

LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mãla

  1. third-person singular present of malti
  2. third-person plural present of malti

LovonoEdit

MargiEdit

NounEdit

mala

  1. woman

ReferencesEdit

  • Carl Hoffmann, A grammar of the Margi language (1963)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse mala.

VerbEdit

mala (present tense mel, past tense mol, past participle male, present participle malande, imperative mal)

  1. to grind
  2. to make a grinding sound, e.g. to purr (of a cat)

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

mala (present tense malar, past tense mala, past participle mala, passive infinitive malast, present participle malande, imperative mal/mala)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by måla, to paint

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *malaną, whence also Old Saxon malan, Old High German malan, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌻𐌰𐌽 (malan).

VerbEdit

mala (singular past indicative mól, plural past indicative mólu, past participle malinn)

  1. to grind
  2. to make a grinding sound, e.g. to purr (of a cat)

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • mala in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mala in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • mala in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • mala in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to be broken down by misfortune: in malis iacere
    • (ambiguous) to be hard pressed by misfortune: malis urgeri
    • (ambiguous) to have a good or bad reputation, be spoken well, ill of: bona, mala existimatio est de aliquo
    • (ambiguous) moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • (ambiguous) to take a thing in good (bad) part: in bonam (malam) partem accipere aliquid
    • (ambiguous) a guilty conscience: conscientia mala or peccatorum, culpae, sceleris, delicti
    • (ambiguous) to be tormented by remorse: conscientia mala angi, excruciari
    • (ambiguous) to bless (curse) a person: precari alicui bene (male) or omnia bona (mala), salutem
    • (ambiguous) from beginning to end: ab ovo usque ad mala (proverb.)
  • mala in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Old SwedishEdit

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

mala n

  1. impurity
  2. stain
  3. rust
  4. dirt
  5. dung

DeclensionEdit


PitjantjatjaraEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mala

  1. rufous hare-wallaby (Lagorchestes hirsutus)

ReferencesEdit

  • Paul A. Eckert (2007) Pitjantjatjara / Yankunytjatjara Picture Dictionary[3], IAD Press, →ISBN

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French malle (large suitcase; trunk), from Middle French malle, from Old French male (leather bag, leather or wooden travel-case), from Frankish *malha (leather bag), from Proto-Germanic *malhō (leather bag), from Proto-Indo-European *molko- (leather bag).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mala f (plural malas)

  1. suitcase
  2. (travel) luggage
  3. (automotive) boot, trunk
  4. (chiefly Portugal) handbag
  5. (idiomatic) An irritating person.

SynonymsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish mala.

NounEdit

mala f (genitive singular mala, plural malaichean)

  1. brow
    1. (anatomy) eyebrow
    2. (geography, of hill) brow; slope, incline

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
mala mhala
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • Faclair Gàidhlig Dwelly Air Loidhne, Dwelly, Edward (1911), Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic-English Dictionary (10th ed.), Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, →ISBN
  • mala” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

SicilianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin malus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈma.la/
  • Hyphenation: mà‧la

AdjectiveEdit

mala f sg

  1. feminine singular of malu; bad.

InflectionEdit

Masculine Feminine
Singular malu mala
Plural mali mali

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mala ("bad, evil"), feminine of malus.

AdjectiveEdit

mala

  1. Feminine singular of adjective malo.

Etymology 2Edit

From French malle (large suitcase; trunk), from Middle French malle, from Old French male (leather bag, leather or wooden travel-case), from Frankish *malha (leather bag), from Proto-Germanic *malhō (leather bag), from Proto-Indo-European *molko- (leather bag).

NounEdit

mala f (plural malas)

  1. suitcase
  2. mailbag
  3. mail, post
Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish mala, from Old Norse mala, from Proto-Germanic *malaną.

VerbEdit

mala (present mal, preterite malde, supine malt, imperative mal)

  1. to grind; to make smaller
  2. to speak ceaselessly, usually about one single subject

Usage notesEdit

  • Alternate form for the present tense: mal, and alternate form for the past participle (which only exist in the sense of grinding): malen.

ConjugationEdit


TuvaluanEdit

NounEdit

mala

  1. plague

WolofEdit

NounEdit

mala (definite form mala mi)

  1. animal