See also: ním, n-im, nim-, and ним

English

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English nimen, from Old English niman (to take), from Proto-West Germanic *neman, from Proto-Germanic *nemaną (to take), from Proto-Indo-European *nem- (to give or take one's due).

Cognate with Saterland Frisian nieme (to take), West Frisian nimme (to take), Dutch nemen (to take), Low German nehmen (to take), German nehmen (to take), Danish nemme (to learn, grasp). Related to numb and nimble.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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nim (third-person singular simple present nims, present participle nimming, simple past nimmed or nam or nom, past participle nimmed or nom or nomen or num)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To take or seize.
    • 1547 (original; printed 1870), Andrew Boorde, The First Boke of the Introduction of Knowledge, page 122:
      Ich cham a Cornysche man, al[e] che can brew; [] Nym me a quart of ale, that iche may it of sup.
    • 1566–1573 (original; printed 1873), John Partridge, The Hystorie of the Moste Noble Knight Plasidas, and Other Rare Pieces, page 106:
      Then Alfyne to the court Of Syleuma doth come,
      And Pandauola in her armes
      Her Alfyne hath up num
      And kisseth him full ofte []
    • 2017, Thomas Heywood, A Woman Killed With Kindness, Bloomsbury Publishing, →ISBN, page 155:
      Gryndall carefully sets out the difference between seizing or nimming a bird (an outcome that would constitute a partly successful flight) and taking the bird outright: 'And if your Hawke noume [nim, seize] a foule, and the foule breake from her, she hath discomfited many feathers of the foule, and is broken away: but in kindly speech you shall say, your hawke hath noumed or seased a foule, and not taken it'.
  2. (archaic, slang, transitive) To filch, steal, pilfer.
    • 1663, Samuel Butler, Hudibras, part 1, canto 1:
      They'll question Mars, and, by his look,
      Detect who 'twas that nimm'd a cloak;
    • 1785, Hutton, Bran New Wark, I. 305, quoted in 1903, Joseph Wright, The English Dialect Dictionary: M-Q, page 273:
      Nimming and niftering whativver he can try his fists on.
    • 1821, Apuleius, The Golden Ass of Lucius Apuleius, of Medaura, page 131:
      But while he fell in some brave exploit, you, I suppose, being provident rogues and thieves of discretion, were on the sure lay, pilfering little thefts among the mob, fearfully nimming a cloak or rifling some old woman's bulk of a stock to set up a piece-broker's shop.
    • 1824 (edition; original 1790), Nairne, Tales, 37, quoted in 1903, Joseph Wright, The English Dialect Dictionary: M-Q, page 273:
      They nim a pig, a duck, or fowl.
    • 1854, Oliver Oldham, Oldham's Amusing and Instructive Reader: A Course of Reading, Original and Selected, in Prose and Poetry, Wherein Wit, Humor, and Mirth are Made the Means of Awakening Interest, and Imparting Instructon : for the Use of Schools and Academies, page 110:
      Shall we go nim a horse, Tom,—what dost think? [] Nim? yes, yes, yes, let's nim with all my heart; I see no harm in nimming, for my part; [] Were it my lord mayor's hourse—I'd nim it first. [...A horse] they stole, or, as they called it, nimmed,
      Just as the twilight all the landscape dimmed. [] What is most likely, is that both these elves
      Were, in like manner, halter-nimmed themselves.
  3. (intransitive, UK dialectal) To walk with short, quick strides; trip along.
    • 1856, Thompson, Hist. Boston, page 716, quoted in 1903, Joseph Wright, The English Dialect Dictionary: M-Q, page 273:
      The old lady does nim along.
      1949, Wilfrid J. Halliday, Arthur Stanley Umpleby, The White Rose Garland of Yorkshire Dialect Verse and Local and Folk-lore Rhymes (quoting Irene Sutcliffe), page 111:
      Ah had set myself doon where the aums meet aboon,
      When Jinny jamp oop, and ganned nimming alang
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Noun

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nim (uncountable)

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
  1. A game in which players take turns removing objects from heaps.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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nim (plural nims)

  1. Alternative form of neem (Indian tree)

See also

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Anagrams

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Afar

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Etymology

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From (our) +‎ -m.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈnim/ [ˈnɪm]
  • Hyphenation: nim

Pronoun

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ním (predicative níimi or niimí)

  1. ours

See also

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References

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  • E. M. Parker, R. J. Hayward (1985) “nim”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2004) Parlons Afar: Langue et Culture, L'Hammartan, →ISBN, page 67
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[1], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Baatonum

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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nim (m-class)

  1. water

Derived terms

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References

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  • Barassounon, Pierre, Biɔ, Sanu, Biɔ, Thébault, Goragui, Léonard, Soutar, Jean (2021 February 17) Dictionnaire Baatonum[2], Philadelphia: SIL International

Cemuhî

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Numeral

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nim

  1. five

Czech

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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nim

  1. dative plural of oni, ony, and ona (after a preposition)

Finnish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English nim.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈnim/, [ˈnim]
  • Rhymes: -im
  • Syllabification(key): nim

Noun

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nim

  1. nim (game)

Declension

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Inflection of nim (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
nominative nim nimit
genitive nimin nimien
partitive nimiä nimejä
illative nimiin nimeihin
singular plural
nominative nim nimit
accusative nom. nim nimit
gen. nimin
genitive nimin nimien
partitive nimiä nimejä
inessive nimissä nimeissä
elative nimistä nimeistä
illative nimiin nimeihin
adessive nimillä nimeillä
ablative nimiltä nimeiltä
allative nimille nimeille
essive niminä nimeinä
translative nimiksi nimeiksi
abessive nimittä nimeittä
instructive nimein
comitative See the possessive forms below.
Possessive forms of nim (Kotus type 5/risti, no gradation)
first-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative nimini nimini
accusative nom. nimini nimini
gen. nimini
genitive nimini nimieni
partitive nimiäni nimejäni
inessive nimissäni nimeissäni
elative nimistäni nimeistäni
illative nimiini nimeihini
adessive nimilläni nimeilläni
ablative nimiltäni nimeiltäni
allative nimilleni nimeilleni
essive niminäni nimeinäni
translative nimikseni nimeikseni
abessive nimittäni nimeittäni
instructive
comitative nimeineni
second-person singular possessor
singular plural
nominative nimisi nimisi
accusative nom. nimisi nimisi
gen. nimisi
genitive nimisi nimiesi
partitive nimiäsi nimejäsi
inessive nimissäsi nimeissäsi
elative nimistäsi nimeistäsi
illative nimiisi nimeihisi
adessive nimilläsi nimeilläsi
ablative nimiltäsi nimeiltäsi
allative nimillesi nimeillesi
essive niminäsi nimeinäsi
translative nimiksesi nimeiksesi
abessive nimittäsi nimeittäsi
instructive
comitative nimeinesi
first-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative nimimme nimimme
accusative nom. nimimme nimimme
gen. nimimme
genitive nimimme nimiemme
partitive nimiämme nimejämme
inessive nimissämme nimeissämme
elative nimistämme nimeistämme
illative nimiimme nimeihimme
adessive nimillämme nimeillämme
ablative nimiltämme nimeiltämme
allative nimillemme nimeillemme
essive niminämme nimeinämme
translative nimiksemme nimeiksemme
abessive nimittämme nimeittämme
instructive
comitative nimeinemme
second-person plural possessor
singular plural
nominative niminne niminne
accusative nom. niminne niminne
gen. niminne
genitive niminne nimienne
partitive nimiänne nimejänne
inessive nimissänne nimeissänne
elative nimistänne nimeistänne
illative nimiinne nimeihinne
adessive nimillänne nimeillänne
ablative nimiltänne nimeiltänne
allative nimillenne nimeillenne
essive niminänne nimeinänne
translative nimiksenne nimeiksenne
abessive nimittänne nimeittänne
instructive
comitative nimeinenne
third-person possessor
singular plural
nominative niminsä niminsä
accusative nom. niminsä niminsä
gen. niminsä
genitive niminsä nimiensä
partitive nimiään
nimiänsä
nimejään
nimejänsä
inessive nimissään
nimissänsä
nimeissään
nimeissänsä
elative nimistään
nimistänsä
nimeistään
nimeistänsä
illative nimiinsä nimeihinsä
adessive nimillään
nimillänsä
nimeillään
nimeillänsä
ablative nimiltään
nimiltänsä
nimeiltään
nimeiltänsä
allative nimilleen
nimillensä
nimeilleen
nimeillensä
essive niminään
niminänsä
nimeinään
nimeinänsä
translative nimikseen
nimiksensä
nimeikseen
nimeiksensä
abessive nimittään
nimittänsä
nimeittään
nimeittänsä
instructive
comitative nimeineen
nimeinensä

Synonyms

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Anagrams

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Gothic

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Romanization

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nim

  1. Romanization of 𐌽𐌹𐌼

Hausa

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Arabic نِيم (nīm), from Hindi नीम (nīm).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nîm m

  1. neem tree

Descendants

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  • Nupe: nímù

Livonian

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Alternative forms

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  • ni'm (Courland)

Etymology

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From Proto-Finnic *nimi.

Noun

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nim

  1. name

Declension

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Lower Sorbian

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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nim (only after a preposition)

  1. instrumental of wón
  2. instrumental of wóno
  3. dative of wóni
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  • (dative of wóni): jim

Macanese

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Etymology

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From Portuguese nem.

Pronunciation

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Adverb

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nim

  1. not even (introduces an emphatic negation)
    Miguel nim sábi papiâ bêm-fêto Patuá
    Miguel doesn't even know how to speak Macanese well
  2. do not even (introduces an emphatic negative command)
  3. neithernor

References

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Adverb

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nim

  1. much

Mokilese

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Verb

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nim

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to drink

Old English

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Verb

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nim

  1. imperative singular of niman

Old Irish

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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nim

  1. dative singular of nem

Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
nim
also nnim after a proclitic
nim
pronounced with /n(ʲ)-/
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Ottawa

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Noun

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nim anim

  1. dog

References

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Jerry Randolph Valentine (2001) Nishnaabemwin Reference Grammar, University of Toronto, page 482

Polish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronoun

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nim

  1. instrumental/locative of on
  2. instrumental/locative of ono
  3. dative of oni
  4. dative of one

These forms are used only after prepositions.

See also

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Etymology 2

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Probably a clipping of zanim.

Conjunction

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nim

  1. (literary) before
    Synonym: zanim

Further reading

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  • nim in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • nim in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes:
  • Hyphenation: nim

Etymology 1

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From Hindi नीम (nīm), from Sanskrit निम्ब (nimba).

Noun

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nim m (plural nins)

  1. neem (Azadirachta indica, an evergreen tree of India)

Etymology 2

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Blend of não (no) +‎ sim (yes). Compare German Jein.

Adverb

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nim (not comparable)

  1. (humorous, neologism) yes and no

Noun

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nim m (plural nins)

  1. (humorous, neologism) yes and no

Q'eqchi

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Adjective

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nim

  1. big, great

Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • Ch'ina tusleb' aatin q'eqchi'-kaxlan aatin ut kaxlan aatin-q'eqchi' (Guatemala, 1998) [3]

Suga

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Noun

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nim

  1. water

Sumerian

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Romanization

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nim

  1. Romanization of 𒉏 (nim)

Swedish

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old Swedish næmber (apt, docile), from Old Norse næmr, from Proto-Germanic *nāmjaz, derived from Proto-Germanic *nemaną (to take). Compare Danish Danish nem (easy) and Icelandic næmur (docile, sensitive).

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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nim (comparative nimmare, superlative nimmast)

  1. (Scania) convenient, handy, practical, easy
    • 2005, “Kamp för att få fram hemtjänstens mat [Struggle to get home care food delivered]”, in Sydsvenskan[4]:
      – Den är ganska nim att köra. Man sitter högt och sådär.
      – It’s quite easy to drive. You sit high up and such.
    • 2008, Anders Fagerström, “Vi grillar engångsgrillar [We use disposable grills]”, in Sydsvenskan[5]:
      Men rätt hanterad är engångsgrillen utan tvekan en nim och trevlig sak på utflykten […]
      But handled properly, the disposable grill is without a doubt a convenient and nice thing to bring to an excursion […]
    • 2010, “Hur var det att ta ut hojen igen? [What was it like to bring out your motorbike again?]”, in Sydsvenskan[6]:
      Och så är det nimmt att komma fram vid vägarbeten och inne i stan när det är tjockt. Sen är det nästan alltid lätt att hitta en parkering också.
      And it’s also easy to get past the roadworks and get around inside the city when it’s crowded. It’s almost always easy to find parking too.
    • 2017, “’Jag behövde förtroende och kärlek - och det fick jag direkt’ [’I needed trust and love - and I got it right away’]”, in Sydsvenskan[7]:
      Sen är det klart att det är nimt att ha Köpenhamn så nära, det är lätt att åka över och träffa kompisar och familj, säger han.
      Then of course it’s convenient that Copenhagen is so close, it’s easy to cross over and meet friends and family, he says.

Declension

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Inflection of nim
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular nim nimmare nimmast
Neuter singular nimt nimmare nimmast
Plural nimma nimmare nimmast
Masculine plural3 nimme nimmare nimmast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 nimme nimmare nimmaste
All nimma nimmare nimmaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Derived terms

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References

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  • ”nim” in Lundbladh, Carl-Erik (2014) Skånska dialektord, 2nd edition, Uppsala: Institutet för språk och folkminnen
  • nim in Elias Wessén, Våra ord : deras uttal och ursprung (1979)
  • ”næma” in de Vries, Jan (2000) Altnordisches etymologisches Wörterbuch, 2nd revised edition, Leiden: Brill, page 413
  • ”nämber” in Söderwall, K.F. (1884-1918) Ordbok öfver svenska medeltids-språket[8], volume I-III

Anagrams

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Volapük

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Etymology

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From English animal (which ultimately derives from Latin animal).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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nim (nominative plural nims)

  1. animal (Animalia)

Declension

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Hyponyms

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Derived terms

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See also

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